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Old 2020-06-30, 09:51   #1
xilman
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"𒉺𒌌𒇷𒆷𒀭"
May 2003
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Default Ænglisc

Ænglisc is the West Germanic language spoken in large parts of the British Isles and elsewhere in northwest Europe from roughly the fifth through the twelfth centuries CE. It is much more highly inflected than modern English so newcomers to the language may find it easier to learn if they already have some knowledge of, say, modern German.

Clarification: Languages closely related to Ænglisc were spoken outside the British Isles, rather than the pure language itself.

Last fiddled with by xilman on 2020-06-30 at 12:25 Reason: Add clarification.
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Old 2020-06-30, 10:41   #2
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From the National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen
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Old 2020-07-04, 17:29   #3
xilman
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Anyone else seen the Beowulf movie?

Parts of it are excellent but the depiction of Grendel's mother seems more designed to titillate the modern audience than to remain true to the original.

What I particularly liked is how Grendel spoke Ænglisc in distinction to all other characters whose dialogues are in current Modern English.
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