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Old 2008-07-26, 19:29   #1
Prime95
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Default New largest prime number found

Contact Person: Seyed M. Ghaem Maghami
Tel: withheld
E-mail: withheld


Date: 27/7/2008


ANNOUNCMENT:


UNBLIND LOVE UNION Project announced the amazing discovery of the largest prime number known. The new discovery brought to life a prime number with 167,225,526 digits, the new largest prime number starts with five and ends with seven. The previous largest prime had less than 10 million digits.



Discovered by the project’s director and founder, Mr. Seyed M. Ghaem Maghami, on July 12th 2008 at 2:14 PM, the discovery was announced very quietly on July 24, 2008, at the project office of Unblind Love Union Project, currently located in Mr. Maghami home town, Arak, Iran. The discovery has surprised most researchers and research institutes since such a discovery takes a lot of resources and man power.



The New Largest Prime is:



{[(2411111111411111111)*(2^555511111)] - 1}=(5.222044891117083)*10^167225525



“One important thing that I like to mention is about the methodology that I used for my discovery. I did not use the traditional methods known to number theorists. That’s why most researchers in the field would dismiss my discovery at first glance. I would like to ask all the researchers in this area to look at this amazing number and remember that compassion for humanity and less fortunate brings its own reward.” (Seyed M. Ghaem Maghami)



Unblind Love Union Project is a private non-for-profit organization which aims to bring new hope for the blinds all over the world and has revealed some of the project’s new ideas to American Blind Association in United States.



The new largest prime, after confirmation by other researchers, will win at least two prizes offered Electronic Frontier Foundation in United States, one for the first prime number with more than 10 million digits and another one for the first prime number with more than 100 million digits.
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Old 2008-07-26, 20:45   #2
veggiespam
 
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Default For real? Verified?

Is this for real and verified yet? URL to announcement?
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Old 2008-07-26, 21:01   #3
jasonp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggiespam View Post
Is this for real and verified yet? URL to announcement?
The crank-o-meter reads off the scale on this one.
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Old 2008-07-26, 21:10   #4
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The number has small factors (can't get much smaller than 3).
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Old 2008-07-27, 11:05   #5
ATH
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Factors below 10^10: 3,23,79,2099,7890991

If I were to claim a new big prime, I would at least trialfactor quite abit first, and probably do some PRP-tests. :)
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Old 2008-07-27, 14:23   #6
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Quote:
The new discovery brought to life a prime number with 167,225,526 digits
Actually there is 167,225,569 digits in 2411111111411111111*2555511111 - 1.

Last fiddled with by ATH on 2008-07-27 at 14:24
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Old 2008-07-27, 17:13   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATH View Post
Actually there is 167,225,569 digits in 2411111111411111111*2555511111 - 1.
As far as I can tell there are 167 225 5626
digits in that number. The number of digits from the original mail is correct.

As for the EFF prices they are not just for finding the huge primes but for the scientific work leading to them, so they are not as "easy" to claim as many think...

Jacob
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Old 2008-07-27, 18:17   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATH View Post
Factors below 10^10: 3,23,79,2099,7890991
Didn't find any others < 10^12.

Alex
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Old 2008-07-27, 20:40   #9
xilman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akruppa View Post
Didn't find any others < 10^12.

Alex
I'm surprised anyone is trying.

Consider in which subsubforum this thread appears.

I didn't bother even looking for the factor 3.


Paul

P.S. Nice troll, George.
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Old 2008-07-27, 21:29   #10
Prime95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
Nice troll, George.
Just thought I'd share a gem from the day's email.
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Old 2008-07-28, 08:40   #11
davieddy
 
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Naive question:
If k*2^n - 1 is prime, what does this tell us about k and n?
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