mersenneforum.org  

Go Back   mersenneforum.org > Fun Stuff > Lounge

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2019-03-05, 14:47   #67
Dr Sardonicus
 
Dr Sardonicus's Avatar
 
Feb 2017
Nowhere

10011111111102 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
In a BBC story, a reporter on the scene pointed to debris, saying it had been inside a trailer home across the road. He also mentioned a car being picked up by the tornado, and found a kilometer (about 3/5 of a mile) away. Also a billboard being picked up, and found 30 miles away. The Sheriff talked about there being just slabs where houses had stood.
Dr Sardonicus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-03-08, 13:03   #68
Xyzzy
 
Xyzzy's Avatar
 
Aug 2002

100000100111002 Posts
Default

Fire tornadoes: https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/07/asia/...house-intl-hnk
Xyzzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-03-08, 14:09   #69
Dr Sardonicus
 
Dr Sardonicus's Avatar
 
Feb 2017
Nowhere

2·3·853 Posts
Default

The recent tornado outbreak in Tennessee had Il Duce visiting to survey the damage in Nashville. Nashville has a population of well over 650,000 and is the capital of the State of Tennessee. One of the tornadoes went through the downtown area.

So much for tornadoes not hitting the downtown areas of major cities. And this was a powerful tornado. According to National Weather Service:

Quote:
Tornado #3 - Davidson/Wilson/Smith County EF-3 Tornado...

Rating: EF3
Estimated Peak Wind: 165 mph
Path Length /statute/: 60.13 miles
Path Width /maximum/: 800.0 yards
Fatalities: 5
Injuries: 220

Start Date: 03/03/2020
Start Time: 12:32 AM CST
Start Location: 7 NE Pegram / Davidson County / TN
Start Lat/Lon: 36.1735 / -86.958

End Date: 03/03/2020
End Time: 01:32 AM CST
End Location: 3 SE Gordonsville / Smith County / TN
End Lat/Lon: 36.1536 / -85.8905

Survey Summary:
A strong long-track tornado tracked across Davidson and Wilson
Counties and into Smith County early on March 3 resulting in 5
fatalities and 220 injuries. The tornado began in far western
Davidson County and rapidly intensified into EF-2 intensity as it
tracked across John C. Tune Airport and into the North Nashville
and Germantown areas. The tornado intensified further to EF-3
intensity as it tracked into East Nashville, with the most
significant damage occuring in and around the Five Points
neighborhood, where two fatalities occurred. EF-1 and EF-2 damage
continued across the Cumberland River before the tornado
strengthened again to EF-3 intensity in the Stanford Estates
subdivision in Donelson. EF-2 damage was observed across Hermitage
and the remainder of Davidson County.

The tornado strengthened to EF-3 intensity for a third time upon
entering Wilson County, with a 6-mile swath of EF-3 damage
observed near the Mt. Juliet area, where three more fatalities
occurred. EF-1 and EF-2 damage continued along a path that
paralleled and occasionally crossed Interstate 40 south-southeast
of Lebanon. Once the tornado moved into Smith County, it weakened
some but was still causing significant tree and powerline damage,
as well as damage to homes. Just south of Gordonsville, the
tornado caused a mobile home to flip, along with destroying
several barns and outbuildings. The tornado finally lifted just
south of I-40 near Highway 141/Lancaster Highway.
Dr Sardonicus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-03-08, 14:54   #70
kriesel
 
kriesel's Avatar
 
"TF79LL86GIMPS96gpu17"
Mar 2017
US midwest

5×7×132 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
In a BBC story, a reporter on the scene pointed to debris, saying it had been inside a trailer home across the road. He also mentioned a car being picked up by the tornado, and found a kilometer (about 3/5 of a mile) away. Also a billboard being picked up, and found 30 miles away. The Sheriff talked about there being just slabs where houses had stood.
Town of Dunn in Wisconsin, south of Madison WI, was hit long ago. One of my coworkers lived on the track. Fortunately his house was on the lee side of a hill and damage was minor compared to his upwind neighbors. It shifted his screen porch measurably but the structure was intact. ALL their clothing had to be removed from the home and cleaned to remove fiberglass from it. After the complete roadblock was lifted, we coworker volunteers spent several evenings after work removing from his lot debris that was formerly homes. A 30-cubic-yard dumpster was placed on the street at township cost and removed and replaced after it was filled. There were signs of drywall smacking the outside of his house and leaving a print of white powder. Batts of fiberglass hanging in what was left of the trees. Twisted-off pieces of roof truss, and panels of metal roofing from farm buildings, were seen in fields miles downwind.

The town set up a lost and found exchange at the town hall. Smaller objects (bibles, paper mail, etc. with identifying information) were found and returned from various locations, extending as far as near Milwaukee, 90 miles east. During one of the cleanup evenings, after depositing debris in the dumpster, returning uphill westward as the sun set, there was still visible aerosolized fiberglass wafting through the air days afterward. We had been breathing fiberglass for hours each cleanup day. On the drive in to his home, one could see various levels of damage, including a bare concrete pad where a home and garage had previously stood, and a house where only the lee side had entirely blown off, yet the stuffed animals and other usual contents were all still in place in the girl's upstairs bedroom in plain view from the road. The same storm twisted oaks off and stacked RVs on each other and removed a lot of overhead electrical distribution wire. https://www.nytimes.com/1992/06/18/u...st-states.html

In 2005 another tracked through several miles south of the earlier one, which can be read about at https://www.stoughtontornado.org/faq.php. There was a less serious one also in 2014. The township created a public shelter near the trailer park in time for the 2005 or 2014 event, and some employers had created or enhanced hardened areas in their buildings.

Madison WI itself (pop. ~200,000) had been hit on other occasions during that quarter century time span, with car lots within miles of my home then getting inventory stacked on one occasion that was only half an hour before the usual weekly emergency siren test, and on another the university research park losing multiple 150 year old massive oak trees and significant residential area damage to trees and structures.

Last fiddled with by kriesel on 2020-03-08 at 15:19
kriesel is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2021-06-25, 21:28   #71
xilman
Bamboozled!
 
xilman's Avatar
 
"π’‰Ίπ’ŒŒπ’‡·π’†·π’€­"
May 2003
Down not across

24×13×53 Posts
Default

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-57605651

This seems a particularly nasty one. It killed 5 people not too far from where I used to work.
xilman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2021-09-11, 10:34   #72
xilman
Bamboozled!
 
xilman's Avatar
 
"π’‰Ίπ’ŒŒπ’‡·π’†·π’€­"
May 2003
Down not across

24·13·53 Posts
Default

Another fatal one. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-58524714
xilman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2021-09-11, 12:44   #73
Dr Sardonicus
 
Dr Sardonicus's Avatar
 
Feb 2017
Nowhere

2·3·853 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
That's awful. I wonder when, if ever, there is a previous tornado on Pantelleria recorded in the annals of history.

Tornadoes are much less frequent in Europe than in the US, and my impression is that they are also much less common on islands than on inland continental areas. (Some tornadoes on islands are associated with hurricanes, just as some tornadoes in the lower 48 are associated with the inland remnants of hurricanes after they have made landfall.) Most tornadoes in the US, however, are associated with severe thunderstorms. Conditions in the central US during the summer can be especially favorable for the development of the kinds of thunderstorms that generate tornadoes. A swath including Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska is called "Tornado Alley." Hot, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico meets cooler, drier air from Canada or the Rocky Mountains, and - boom!

Or, garden-variety summer afternoon thunderstorms form on the east side of the Front Range, head east, meet that nice, juicy Gulf air, and "blow up." Tornadoes are a not-rare consequence, but a much more common occurrence in such storms is large hail, e.g. "baseball hail." A baseball is a little under 3 inches (about 7.5 cm) in diameter. Baseball hail can hit at around 100 mph (160 km/hour), the speed of a fastball. It can punch through windows and skylights, and tear wooden siding off houses. I've never had the displeasure, but I've been inside when quarter-sized hail (about 1 inch or 2.5 cm) has been falling, and just the noise of it hitting the roof is terrifying.
Dr Sardonicus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2021-09-11, 12:53   #74
xilman
Bamboozled!
 
xilman's Avatar
 
"π’‰Ίπ’ŒŒπ’‡·π’†·π’€­"
May 2003
Down not across

24×13×53 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
That's awful. I wonder when, if ever, there is a previous tornado on Pantelleria recorded in the annals of history.

Tornadoes are much less frequent in Europe than in the US, and my impression is that they are also much less common on islands than on inland continental areas.
We have been here before in this thread.

The region with the highest number of tornadoes per square metre per second (to use the SI unit) is southern England. Second is the Netherlands. It was to counter the popular misconception that I started this thread in the first place.

Here is something from https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/climate-in...do-climatology
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOAA
In fact, the United Kingdom has more tornadoes, relative to its land area, than any other country.

Last fiddled with by xilman on 2021-09-11 at 12:57 Reason: Add quote
xilman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2021-09-11, 13:03   #75
kriesel
 
kriesel's Avatar
 
"TF79LL86GIMPS96gpu17"
Mar 2017
US midwest

5·7·132 Posts
Default

Years ago I was at a restaurant in Wisconsin with friends when it began to hail there. I knew my truck was going to get a pounding, but the thought of taking some hail on the head to go move it to sheltered parking was very unappealing. It's been quite a few years, but the dents in the hood and roof have not yet cracked the paint or led to rust. That was maybe quarter size.
More recently, part of eastern Minnesota got baseball size hail, and 6 miles away in Wisconsin, lesser size fell, causing roof damage worthy of insurance claim, but a mile north of that location, there was no apparent damage in asphalt or sheet metal roofing. A year or 2 before that a tornado tracked about 2 miles north of the hail track.
The Dakotas, Minnesota, Iowa and Wisconsin are part of the significantly elevated tornado occurrence area associated with what's sometimes referred to as tornado alley.
http://strangesounds.org/wp-content/...tivity-map.gif

Tornadoes and tornado-like weaker systems can form over bodies of water. Then it may track over an island, given enough lifetime and suitable trajectory. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterspout#Tornadic

September is a busy month for this sort of thing. Good luck all.
Quote:
number of tornadoes per square metre per second
That had better be a small number, even when expressed as number/km2/day. The EF3 or above map's highest threshold, 15 per odd sized area in ~57 years, corresponds to about 1.13E-7/km2/day, 1.3E-18/m2/sec.

Last fiddled with by kriesel on 2021-09-11 at 13:37
kriesel is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2021-09-11, 13:21   #76
Dr Sardonicus
 
Dr Sardonicus's Avatar
 
Feb 2017
Nowhere

2·3·853 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
The region with the highest number of tornadoes per square metre per second
Dr Sardonicus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2021-09-11, 15:28   #77
Uncwilly
6809 > 6502
 
Uncwilly's Avatar
 
"""""""""""""""""""
Aug 2003
101Γ—103 Posts

23·3·421 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
Would you prefer square furlongs per fortnight?


Those areas with high counts of twisters, how many above EF-1's do the get? How does that stack up vs "Tornado Alley" in the US of A?
Uncwilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools


All times are UTC. The time now is 20:24.


Mon Nov 29 20:24:05 UTC 2021 up 129 days, 14:53, 0 users, load averages: 1.74, 1.66, 1.53

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

This forum has received and complied with 0 (zero) government requests for information.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.
A copy of the license is included in the FAQ.