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Old 2020-12-09, 19:52   #12
Uncwilly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kriesel View Post
Narrated Bob Hoover aerobatics from the Shrike cockpit view, including 8-point roll with engines off.
I have seen his show in person. Crazy seeing it fly with only wind noise.
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Old 2020-12-10, 00:35   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by storm5510 View Post
Yeager was the only man to ever shoot down a jet with a piston airplane. He shot down a MiG during The Korean War. It was estimated that his P-51 Mustang was traveling just above 400 MPH. The Mustang's were fitted with British Rolls-Royce Merlin V-12's.
Yeager was one of the first Allies to shoot down a ME-262 during WW2. Youtube has many gun camera shots of ME-262s being shot down ( but be careful of the video game captures ). The British also used their heavily armed and fast Tempests to shoot them down. The Russians bagged some too. Even ME-163 rocket planes were shot down after both planes' Achilles heel was discovered.
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Old 2020-12-10, 02:40   #14
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Now, for something really big. Airbus A380. 853 passengers can be shoe-horned inside. Airbus ceased production last year. It was not profitable for airlines to operate. It did not go over well with the flying public either. Unit cost was $445-million USD each. Many carriers struggled to get 25% of passenger capacity. A few U.S. based airlines who have them stopped using them. Maybe Airbus should have targeted freight carriers, like UPS and FedEx.
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Old 2020-12-10, 04:20   #15
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We were lucky enough to fly with them (as passenger, of course, haha, what did you imagine ) repeatedly (by Singapore, who had a fleet of them at a time, maybe they still have them, but we didn't travel nowhere since Jan. 2020) and I can tell you that is nothing comparable, as technology and comfort. Chairs, touch-terminals, space, whatever. One biggest issue with them is that they can't land on "normal" tracks, they need some longer track, therefore they can only connect "huge" international airports. I can't buy one to fly from home to work, hehe...

Last fiddled with by LaurV on 2020-12-10 at 04:23
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Old 2020-12-10, 15:21   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by storm5510 View Post
Now, for something really big. Airbus A380. 853 passengers can be shoe-horned inside. Airbus ceased production last year. It was not profitable for airlines to operate. It did not go over well with the flying public either. Unit cost was $445-million USD each. Many carriers struggled to get 25% of passenger capacity. A few U.S. based airlines who have them stopped using them. Maybe Airbus should have targeted freight carriers, like UPS and FedEx.
Boeing: 747-400
Airbus: hold my beer
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Old 2020-12-11, 00:38   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kriesel View Post
Boeing: 747-400
Airbus: hold my beer
I did a bit of Googling:

747's first appeared in 1970 and have had several generations since. As of six months ago, there were 1,558 in service. The most current model is the 747-8. Boeing recently announced the end of production with the last planes to be delivered in 2022.

Boeing has been in the heavy aircraft business for a very long time. Everything used in WWII with the "B" designation was theirs. The most complex is the B-52 used by the USAF. They are expected to stay in service into the 2050's. As of 2018, Boeing had 153,000 employees. That's quite a payroll.
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Old 2020-12-11, 00:54   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by storm5510 View Post
Boeing has been in the heavy aircraft business for a very long time. Everything used in WWII with the "B" designation was theirs.
Counter examples:
Brewster SB2A Buccaneer
Consolidated B-32 Dominator
Consolidated PB2Y Coronado
Curtiss SB2C Helldiver
Douglas B-18 Bolo
Douglas B-23 Dragon
Douglas BTD Destroyer
Douglas SBD Dauntless
Martin B-26 Marauder
North American B-25 Mitchell
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Old 2020-12-11, 17:53   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
Counter examples:
Brewster SB2A Buccaneer
Consolidated B-32 Dominator
Consolidated PB2Y Coronado
Curtiss SB2C Helldiver
Douglas B-18 Bolo
Douglas B-23 Dragon
Douglas BTD Destroyer
Douglas SBD Dauntless
Martin B-26 Marauder
North American B-25 Mitchell
Alright, I stand corrected. Is it not possible these companies followed the example? On the other hand, perhaps the military, in general, wanted a standardized designation. B as in Bomber.
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Old 2020-12-11, 18:08   #20
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The US military has designations based upon mission type. The current system:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1962_U...gnation_system
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Old 2020-12-11, 18:20   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
The US military has designations based upon mission type. The current system:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1962_U...gnation_system
This is very interesting. Thank you! Some of these can be combined, it appears, as in the case of the "Huey" helicopter, UH-1. U for utility and H for search, rescue, and Medivac.
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Old 2020-12-11, 18:30   #22
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The H in the UH-1 is because it is a Helicopter. HH is a Search and Rescue Helicopter. AH, Attack, etc.
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