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Old 2005-10-01, 07:56   #1
mfgoode
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Cool Solar Eclipse

September 30, 2005

TOP STORY posted: September 30, 2005 11:27 am EDT
Solar Eclipse Oct. 3 for Europe, Asia, Africa
If you plan to be anywhere in Europe, Africa or parts of western and southern Asia on Monday, Oct. 3, you will be treated to a solar eclipse.
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Old 2005-10-02, 01:03   #2
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Sky & Telescope has details at http://skyandtelescope.com/observing...cle_1593_1.asp

This will not be a total eclipse; it's an annular eclipse, which means that even when the Moon is directly in line between Earth and Sun, ground observers won't see it cover all the Sun's disk. If you're near the centerline, you'll see the Moon surrounded by a ring of the outer portion of the Sun's disk. (Annular comes from the Latin word for ring.)
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Old 2005-10-02, 16:35   #3
mfgoode
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Very true Cheesehead. This is an annular eclipse and not a total one.

Allow me to amplify further.
An eclipse of the sun occurs when the moon revolving (note the term) in its orbit around the earth comes between the sun and the earth. The moon blocks the light of the sun and a shadow of the moon is cast over the earths surface.

By a ‘fortunate’ coincidence the sun’s diameter is 400 times larger than that of the moon and at the same time it is 400 times as far away. From where we are this creates the illusion that they are the same size.
If we look thru a filter at the sun, it looks exactly in size like the moon on a full moon night.
When the moon passes in front of the sun, the shadow falls on the earth and it appears to cover the suns disc. This is what a solar eclipse is------ a shadow!

During a solar eclipse the moon actually casts two shadows toward the earth. One shadow, shaped like a cone is called the ‘umbra’. This becomes narrower as it reaches the earth No direct sunlight penetrates into this area. The path of this is called the path of totality. If you are positioned in this area you see a complete blocking of the sun and view a total solar eclipse .The second shadow is called the ‘penumbra’ which spreads out as it reaches the earth. The ‘penumbra’ is spread over a large area. People viewing the eclipse from this area of the earths surface will see only a partial blocking of he sun.

I have observed a couple of total solar eclipses in my life time from Mumbai and its awe inspiring to see sometimes the ‘diamond ring’ effect of the suns disc with bright spots along the rim which are possibly due to huge solar flares.
I have also noted strange behaviour of animals, birds and some human beings during the eclipse period.
I refrain from my further observations of the solar eclipse effects on the astrological zodiacs lest Garo grabs me by the throat for so called superstition.

The forthcoming eclipse to morrow is at 10* 19’’ Libra.
The northern parts of India will witness about 20% of the solar eclipse while the rest of the country will be witnessing 55% of the annular solar eclipse.
The next annular solar eclipse can be seen at max. phase from India on Jan 15th,2010.
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Old 2005-10-02, 22:51   #4
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In a total solar eclipse, the narrow end of the umbra is usually less than 200 miles wide where it reaches the Earth's surface.

Imagine though, that the Moon is farther away than average during the eclipse. In that case, the umbra may narrow to its pointed end while still above the surface of the Earth. All that reaches the surface is the penumbra. This is exactly what happens during an annular eclipse! The umbra is too short. Or, rather, the Moon is too far away for its umbra (which doesn't really change length much) to reach the Earth.

It is theoretically possible in some cases (not this time) for astronauts in orbit to see a brief total solar eclipse even though no one on the ground can. But they're moving too rapidly to get more than a few seconds of totality, if any.

Quote:
I have observed a couple of total solar eclipses in my life time from Mumbai
From right in the city? Wow! I'll have to look those up.

(And now I've learned something new today -- Mumbai is the new name, since 1995, of the city most of us in the U.S. have known by the Portuguese/British-applied name "Bombay" !! )

Quote:
I have also noted strange behaviour of animals, birds and some human beings during the eclipse period.
This can happen during an annular eclipse, too.

In May 1993 I (among several others from the Milwaukee Astronomical Society) observed an annular eclipse from an Illinois state park that was on the eclipse's centerline. As the Moon covered more and more of the Sun, we noticed many birds landing in trees to roost (as though it were sunset, we supposed).

Side note:
It also happened that we saw U.S. Air Force One being refueled in flight by a KC-135 tanker. The bright white 747 dwarfed the camouflage-painted tanker. President Clinton was in Chicago that day. The air crews practiced almost directly over us, perhaps also taking the opportunity to enjoy an aerial view of the penumbra on the ground. Our telescopes made it easy to confirm the plane's identity -- lettering on its side was easily readable.
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Old 2005-10-03, 00:29   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheesehead
In a total solar eclipse, the narrow end of the umbra is usually less than 200 miles wide where it reaches the Earth's surface.
From right in the city? Wow! I'll have to look those up.
And now I've learned something new today -- Mumbai is the new name, since 1995, of the city most of us in the U.S. have known by the Portuguese/British-applied name "Bombay" !! )
Thank you cheesehead for the additional information on the umbra.
I was wondering all along as to the extent of the area of the umbra.
Yes I live in a suburb of Mumbai (thats the right name now) far away from the neon lights that blur the sky and this eclipse was in the afternoon here.
With my two sons and wife we perched on the terrace of our two storey building armed with special filter specs that were on sale.

At that time I was an Associate fellow of the British Interplanetary Society at the time when Arthur C. Clarke and Patrick Moon were active members.
Sibsequently I became a member of the British Astronomical association until my membership lapsed
In passing I might as well mention I was also a sustaining member of the Fibonacci association at San Jose, Calif. Along with Bro. Basil Davis now a PhD in Divinity!

I must confess after being 35 yrs. in the airlines in a flying capacity I have never had the good fortune of seeing an aircraft being refuelled in the air!
It must be an enthralling sight. I have flown many times over Baikanur in Russia where they have their launch site cosmodrome but from 33,000 ft up it looked barren!
The planetariam in Moscow compares well with the planetariam at Baker str.? in London and the Haydn planetariam in N.Y. I used to leave my journals in my room in the state owned UKraina hotel openly and as expected they put a tag on my activities by an attractive female agent who posed as a maid from the housekeeping.
As expected I got into contact and became friendly with her.
With nothing special to report on me she encouraged my interests (in astronomy!). Communication was easy as she spoke seven languages fluently
and took me to see the planetarium and also to the Economic Pavillion where a full sized Vostok rocket was on the pad.
In 1964 I saw a full scale model of the unmanned satellite launched at about that time in N.Y. and have photographs with my Commnader and flight engineer. I was In London when Neil armstrong put the first steps on the moon and watched the landing live on TV.
Mally

Last fiddled with by akruppa on 2005-10-03 at 09:00 Reason: missing [/QUOTE] tag
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Old 2005-10-03, 03:37   #6
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Cool Solar Eclipse.


In retrospect and referring to my diaries the attractive female agent was from the KGB. Strange but true and not a 007 thriller!
The unmanned satellite I saw was probably the first unmanned lunar module that successfully landed on the moon prior to the manned lunar anding
Mally
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Old 2005-10-03, 08:46   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfgoode
September 30, 2005

TOP STORY posted: September 30, 2005 11:27 am EDT
Solar Eclipse Oct. 3 for Europe, Asia, Africa
If you plan to be anywhere in Europe, Africa or parts of western and southern Asia on Monday, Oct. 3, you will be treated to a solar eclipse.
Thick cloud and drizzle here in Cambridge. Unless there's a truly amazing change in the weather I very much doubt that I'll see anything of the eclipse.


Paul
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Old 2005-10-03, 09:21   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman
Thick cloud and drizzle here in Cambridge. Unless there's a truly amazing change in the weather I very much doubt that I'll see anything of the eclipse.
This reminds me of 1999, where we had a total eclipse here in Belgium, but I didn't see anything of the totality because of the clouds :-(

Today it's nice weather. Just had a look at the sun (through special glasses of course), it looks just like a crescent moon. Too bad it's not a total eclipse.
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Old 2005-10-03, 09:23   #9
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Thumbs down Solar Eclipse

:surprised
Paul Its the same here in Mumbai but I expect it to clear in the one and a half hours left for the start of the eclipse
Mally
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Old 2005-10-03, 13:40   #10
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The sky is clear in Lisbon, so I have seen it this morning (09:55 local time, GMT+1). ~82% of the surface of the sun was covered. One could feel a significant drop in temperature and luminosity. It wasn´t annular in Lisbon, though, but far north in the country, near the city of Bragança, and there the sun was more than 90% covered.
Anyway, it was very interesting to observe it. It was much more apparent than the one in 1999.
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Old 2005-10-03, 14:49   #11
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No such luck in Mumbai. The sky was overcast by a heavy cloud cover and it rained all day. We saw it live on Tv from the Hindu holy pilgrim city of Hardwar in the North of India but only 20% was covered- disappointing! Pictures from other southern states shoulfd follow tomorrow

The Vedic pundits say this eclipse will be followed by a lunar eclipse on October the 17th. They say its rare for a solar and a lunar eclipse to occur within a fortnight. They say it will effect the seas, and earthquakes and atmospheric disturbances are likely to occur
Mally
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