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Old 2015-03-24, 10:34   #1
retina
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Default How do you explain the colour blue to someone that was born blond?

How can a born-blind person conceptualise the notion of colour?

How would you explain colour to them in a way that they can understand?
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Old 2015-03-24, 12:32   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
How can a born-blind person conceptualise the notion of colour?

How would you explain colour to them in a way that they can understand?
one of my first thoughts is wavelength.
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Old 2015-03-24, 12:56   #3
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Does this question mean you already have a satisfactory method of explaining sight? It might help to know how that works so we can integrate the concept of color into the concept of sight.

It seems to me that you should try to explain "color," with "blue" being a special case of color.

How about a musical analogy? The differences among "identical" instruments - pianos or tin whistles, for example. There are more soothing sounds and harsher sounds - color is a similar property of sight.
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Old 2015-03-24, 13:30   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wblipp View Post
How about a musical analogy? The differences among "identical" instruments - pianos or tin whistles, for example. There are more soothing sounds and harsher sounds - color is a similar property of sight.
in school I had a project related to sun exposure and I drew an analogy with wavelengths of sound. because v/F=w; so for example we get that one hertz at the speed of light is roughly equivalent in wavelength to 1 microhertz at the speed of sound. so turning to calculation you could explain the UV spectrum as notes but I think that ended up 21 octaves above middle C so it's far too high to give an auditory equivalent much use without playing with the speed of sound.

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Old 2015-03-24, 14:07   #5
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Using sounds makes sense, because blind people can hear well. One could also use the feeling sense. Both these senses create emotions. So I would translate all colors, intensities, shineniness, etc. etc. as emotions to their sound or surface equivalents. I would choose the colors, the sound and the surfaces from natural things because our emotions are already attached to these. Except human made colors that do not appear in nature.

Maybe seawaves on the shore in modest noiselevels are a good representation for blue.
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Old 2015-03-24, 15:19   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
How can a born-blind person conceptualise the notion of colour?

How would you explain colour to them in a way that they can understand?
How do you explain "near infra-red", mid-infra-red", "thermal infra-red" and "far infra-red" to someone?

By analogy, of course.
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Old 2015-03-24, 17:13   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
How can a born-blind person conceptualise the notion of colour?

How would you explain colour to them in a way that they can understand?
Almost any bullshit explanation will suffice, since they don't know the difference.
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Old 2015-03-24, 17:27   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axn View Post
Almost any bullshit explanation will suffice, since they don't know the difference.
Disagree. Colour is nothing more than frequency.
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Old 2015-03-24, 17:29   #9
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Default foudn this after I looked at this thread.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014...n_5546752.html
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Old 2015-03-24, 18:43   #10
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http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...s-9196711.html
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Old 2015-03-24, 19:39   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axn View Post
Almost any bullshit explanation will suffice, since they don't know the difference.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chalsall View Post
Disagree. Colour is nothing more than frequency.
I rather think you two agree with each other. Certainly I agree with both of your statements (except chalsall's one-word first sentence).
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