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Old 2021-10-15, 03:39   #23
Dr Sardonicus
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick View Post
To get the best possible understanding, you have to study the original languages and the culture of the people who spoke them, of course.
The big problem with a translation into any modern language is: how much do you assume the reader to know about all that
(allowing you to stick closely to the original) and how much do you attempt to make things clearer?
<snip>
Sometimes, additional source material becomes available. There is also the fact that modern languages change over time. Both of these factors are relevant to English translations since the King James Version.

Consider, for example, Matthew 12:1 (KJV):
Quote:
At that time Jesus went on the sabbath day through the corn; and his disciples were an hungred, and began to pluck the ears of corn, and to eat.
Of course, "corn" (as we think of it now) is a cereal grain of the New World. Jesus and the disciples couldn't possibly have been in a corn field! How could the translators have made such a mistake?

But it wasn't a mistake. When the KJV was being made, "corn" was a generic English term for grain. New translations in any modern language have to take into account the changing meanings of words.
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Old 2021-10-22, 09:55   #24
Lariliss
 
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Today we call it globalization. 100 years ago it was another history, and we don’t know how many ‘minorities' went extinct.
Still there are lots of them indigenous around the World to be cared of.
Even English language lives in assimilating way in every country.
We are various and still try to go the same path and judge every corner of the globe in the same way.
The great works of scientists who go for human understanding.


'The voices of indigenous people of the north including Siberia were recorded many decades ago on tape. That was the medium of the day to best capture the stories and language of the people. Today those tapes are seriously degrading and to ensure those voices of the past are preserved, anthropologist Professor David Anderson will co-lead a team to digitise them.

In a two year project funded by the Modern Endangered Archives Program at the UCLA Library with funding from Arcadia, Professor Anderson from Aberdeen University and a team of specialist sound technicians will extract the audio recordings from tapes which are currently held at Pushkin House in St Petersburg, Russia.

Today we call it globalization. 100 years ago it was another history, and we don't know how many 'minorities went extinct.
Still there are lots of them indigenous around the World to be cared of.
Even English language lives in assimilating way in every country.
We are various and still try to go the same path and judge every corner of the globe in the same way.
The great works of scientists who go for human understanding.
' - quote.
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Old 2021-10-24, 00:36   #25
a1call
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick View Post
To get the best possible understanding, you have to study the original languages and the culture of the people who spoke them, of course.
The big problem with a translation into any modern language is: how much do you assume the reader to know about all that
(allowing you to stick closely to the original) and how much do you attempt to make things clearer?

With the Bible, these discussions often involve theological differences too.
In the Lord's Prayer, for example, some theologians object to saying "Lead us not into temptation" on the grounds that
God would never be a leader in something sinful! Others insist this is closest to the original text.
IIRC, that was the main subject for "East of Eden".

Quote:
thou mayest
According to one translation of the Bible, God orders Cain to triumph over sin, while according to another, God promises Cain that he will defeat sin. Lee's research, however, has revealed that timshel means “thou mayest,” implying that God tells Cain that he has a choice whether or not to overcome sin. Lee sees this idea of free choice over evil a token of optimism that is central to the human condition.
https://www.sparknotes.com/lit/easto...%20sees%20this
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Old 2021-10-24, 08:05   #26
Nick
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a1call View Post
IIRC, that was the main subject for "East of Eden".
Certainly an interesting link!
If you have university access to online journals, the Daniel Levin article is also worth reading:
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325...view.12.2.0190
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