mersenneforum.org  

Go Back   mersenneforum.org > Fun Stuff > Lounge

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2020-10-12, 15:08   #45
Uncwilly
6809 > 6502
 
Uncwilly's Avatar
 
"""""""""""""""""""
Aug 2003
101×103 Posts

8,863 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by a1call View Post
1 femtosecond has the same ratio to 1 second as 1 second does to 31675 millennia.
For practical purposes 1 nanosecond is 1 foot when concerned with transmission of light/electrical impulses on fibre / wire.



Chile is 11 European countries long. (see attached)
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Chile.jpg
Views:	27
Size:	130.1 KB
ID:	23526  
Uncwilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 15:19   #46
Dr Sardonicus
 
Dr Sardonicus's Avatar
 
Feb 2017
Nowhere

EC316 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
For practical purposes 1 nanosecond is 1 foot when concerned with transmission of light/electrical impulses on fibre / wire.
If memory serves, Grace Hopper used segments of wire to illustrate this.
Dr Sardonicus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 16:34   #47
LaurV
Romulan Interpreter
 
LaurV's Avatar
 
Jun 2011
Thailand

3×13×229 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kladner View Post
I fume at that. Don't superconducting magnets have a more productive claim?
As I thought, helium is produced via distillation from natural gas.
Yet, it is still non-renewable. Natural gas does not contain helium, I mean, chemically. Helium is just impurity. Once extracted, consumed, it raises in the upper atmosphere and it is lost in space. The only way to make it is by fusion/fission. The planet will run out of it sometimes in the future.
LaurV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 17:32   #48
storm5510
Random Account
 
storm5510's Avatar
 
Aug 2009
U.S.A.

2×839 Posts
Default

People in an underground shelter during the bombing of Dresden, Germany, near the end of WWII in Europe, were boiled alive by the intense heat after the shelter flooded with water. Their skeletons were found in the bottom of a greenish-brown liquid in the shelter.
storm5510 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 18:28   #49
a1call
 
a1call's Avatar
 
"Rashid Naimi"
Oct 2015
Remote to Here/There

7×277 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
For practical purposes 1 nanosecond is 1 foot when concerned with transmission of light/electrical impulses on fibre / wire.
Quote:
There’s a trick to grasp exactly how short a femtosecond is. Astronomers use the unit of “light year” to describe very large distances. One light year, or the distance the light travels over the time span of a year, is roughly 9.461 quadrillion km in our daily unit.

Very short time can be described the other way round. For example, we can consider 1 microsecond, or one millionth of a second, as 300 light meters, using the distance the light can travel during the time span. In this scheme, a femtosecond is 0.3 light micrometers, which is roughly the size of a virus.
https://www.nims.go.jp/ldynamics/en/How_short.html
a1call is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 19:20   #50
a1call
 
a1call's Avatar
 
"Rashid Naimi"
Oct 2015
Remote to Here/There

7·277 Posts
Default

The g-force of the Earth is 1 g.
The g-force of the sun is 28.02 g.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surface_gravity

Last fiddled with by a1call on 2020-10-12 at 19:25
a1call is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 20:02   #51
xilman
Bamboozled!
 
xilman's Avatar
 
"𒉺𒌌𒇷𒆷𒀭"
May 2003
Down not across

3·43·79 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurV View Post
Yet, it is still non-renewable. Natural gas does not contain helium, I mean, chemically. Helium is just impurity. Once extracted, consumed, it raises in the upper atmosphere and it is lost in space. The only way to make it is by fusion/fission. The planet will run out of it sometimes in the future.
I call BS.

There is a truly vast amount of He in the atmospheres of the gas and ice giants.
xilman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 20:24   #52
a1call
 
a1call's Avatar
 
"Rashid Naimi"
Oct 2015
Remote to Here/There

7·277 Posts
Default

Fax-Machines predate telephones by more than a decade.
This gentleman patented a Fax-Machine in 1843.
Oh, he also invented the Earth-Battery and the Electric-Clock.

Quote:
Bain worked on an experimental fax machine from 1843 to 1846. He used a clock to synchronise the movement of two pendulums for line-by-line scanning of a message. For transmission, Bain applied metal pins arranged on a cylinder made of insulating material. An electric probe that transmitted on-off pulses then scanned the pins. The message was reproduced at the receiving station on electrochemically sensitive paper impregnated with a chemical solution similar to that developed for his chemical telegraph. In his patent description dated 27 May 1843 for "improvements in producing and regulating electric currents and improvements in timepieces, and in electric printing, and signal telegraphs," he claimed that "a copy of any other surface composed of conducting and non-conducting materials can be taken by these means".[6] The transmitter and receiver were connected by five wires. In 1850 he applied for an improved version but was too late, as Frederick Bakewell had obtained a patent for his superior "image telegraph" two years earlier in 1848.

Bain's and Bakewell's laboratory mechanisms reproduced poor quality images and were not viable systems because the transmitter and receiver were never truly synchronized. In 1861, the first practical operating electro-mechanical commercially exploited telefax machine, the Pantelegraph, was invented by the Italian physicist Giovanni Caselli. He introduced the first commercial telefax service between Paris and Lyon at least 11 years before the invention of workable telephones.[7][8]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Bain_(inventor)

Last fiddled with by Uncwilly on 2020-10-13 at 05:14 Reason: Fixed url
a1call is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 21:28   #53
PhilF
 
PhilF's Avatar
 
Feb 2005
Colorado

5·109 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
I call BS.

There is a truly vast amount of He in the atmospheres of the gas and ice giants.
Get busy on getting it here. Then we won't have to worry about helium balloons.
PhilF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 21:48   #54
Dr Sardonicus
 
Dr Sardonicus's Avatar
 
Feb 2017
Nowhere

3,779 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by storm5510 View Post
People in an underground shelter during the bombing of Dresden, Germany, near the end of WWII in Europe, were boiled alive by the intense heat after the shelter flooded with water. Their skeletons were found in the bottom of a greenish-brown liquid in the shelter.
Plenty of folks suffocated in underground shelters because of the fire, or drowned when water mains broke and the shelters flooded. Also many were boiled alive when they sought refuge in "static tanks," which were large pools of water placed around the city to provide water if the distribution system failed.
Dr Sardonicus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-10-12, 23:48   #55
storm5510
Random Account
 
storm5510's Avatar
 
Aug 2009
U.S.A.

167810 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
There is a truly vast amount of He in the atmospheres of the gas and ice giants.
In the 1930's, Germany wanted Helium for their airships. No country would sell it to them after Hitler took over.

About the Hindenburg fire. Its skin was not seamless. It was made up of large panels laced together. Half-inch gaps were left between the panels to allow any leaking hydrogen gas to easily escape. These panels had been soaked in a liquid mixture containing aluminum powder and iron oxide. A professor in Great Britain determined that an electrical charge would build up in the panels to varying levels when the ship moved through the air. He closely studied all the old film which had been shot from different locations at the air station in NJ. He saw an electrical arc in a few frames near the tail on top. It was hot enough to ignite one of the panels. The flammable metallic mixture in the panels is what made them burn away far faster than the rest of the ship. The hydrogen gas simply added fuel to the fire. I saw this in a documentary several months ago.
storm5510 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Interesting Word Origins" thread ewmayer Lounge 17 2020-08-20 01:34
Official "Interesting Animal Behavior" thread ewmayer Lounge 3 2016-05-30 15:26
Perpetual "interesting video" thread... Xyzzy Lounge 9 2006-12-24 20:06
Digicrime interesting link thread xilman Lounge 4 2006-06-04 18:43
Deutscher Thread (german thread) TauCeti NFSNET Discussion 0 2003-12-11 22:12

All times are UTC. The time now is 13:05.

Tue Nov 24 13:05:04 UTC 2020 up 75 days, 10:16, 4 users, load averages: 1.56, 2.05, 2.08

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

This forum has received and complied with 0 (zero) government requests for information.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.
A copy of the license is included in the FAQ.