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Old 2016-02-10, 21:33   #23
ewmayer
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But will Mr. Clapper and his minions also be using the IOT to lie to Congress, or will they continue using their mouths for that purpose? Inquiring minds want to know.
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Old 2016-02-11, 08:54   #24
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This could end up working both ways: if you suspect intelligence officers of lying, you consult the smart devices they carry instead of asking them.

Similarly, biometric passports may restrict the ability of intelligence agencies to issue fake identities, as other countries can link them using the biometric data.
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Old 2016-02-11, 10:11   #25
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It is suspicious unfortunate that when some police officers were asked to submit their body-cam files for review they suddenly found the unit was not working or the memory card was corrupted or something. We can't be naive to assume that anyone will willingly submit data that they know makes them look bad.

For the advantage of a small amount of convenience we pay the heavy price of loss of privacy. It is not worth it IMO.
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Old 2016-02-13, 19:15   #26
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Samsung warns customers not to discuss personal information in front of smart TVs
Quote:
Samsung has now issued a new statement clarifying how the voice activation feature works. "If a consumer consents and uses the voice recognition feature, voice data is provided to a third party during a requested voice command search," Samsung said in a statement. "At that time, the voice data is sent to a server, which searches for the requested content then returns the desired content to the TV."

The company added that it does not retain or sell the voice data, but it didn't name the third party that translates users' speech.

Update, Feb. 10: Samsung has updated its policy and named the third party in question, Nuance Communications, Inc.
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Old 2016-02-26, 09:04   #27
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Engineers achieve Wi-Fi at 10,000 times lower power
One device is plugged in and transmits an rf signal. All the other devices digitally switch antenna impedance to selectively reflect that signal. Standard wifi appliances will detect the result as ordinary wifi packets.

http://passivewifi.cs.washington.edu...ssive_wifi.pdf

Last fiddled with by only_human on 2016-02-26 at 09:19 Reason: s/an/and/ pdf
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Old 2016-07-14, 07:06   #28
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http://www.theverge.com/circuitbreak...f-shit-twitter

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Consider this: when you bought your humble "dumb" thermostat 10 years ago, you connected it to the wall, programmed it and probably forgot about it. Sure, it was inefficient since it’d sometimes heat your house when you weren’t there, but it worked. Now imagine that same thermostat suddenly stopped working after five years, the LED display blinking back at you "thermostat no longer compatible." So you sit in the cold.
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That’s a reality that will unfold one day with internet-connected versions of everything. You’ve heard the horror stories about Samsung Smart TVs slowing down to uselessness with every update, or suddenly getting ads all across the menus before obsolescence, but what happens when it’s actually part of your house?

Well, for one, it means things are less reliable. More than once I’ve come home to an icy house because the internet had gone down, then spent hours trying to fix it only to have the thermostat jammed on 86 degrees until tech support reset my account.

Say Google someday decides that Nest’s drama is a little bit too much for the company to deal with and it offloads it to a company without such deep pockets. That company’s going to look for ways to either reduce costs or extract more money from you — and with smart devices there are plenty of ways to do that.
Quote:
Firstly, that company could cut support for older devices — turn off the servers that keep those old thermostats running, or simply change the endpoint it connects to so it doesn’t function anymore. Alternatively, the new owner could try to monetize you further by selling what your thermostat knows about you to an advertiser.

You probably think that data is meaningless, but it’s enough to make an advertising network salivate: knowing how warm or cold your house is and how often you’re home is enough information to change the ad-personalization game and tailor some incredibly specific advertising on Facebook.

These scenarios aren’t some far-fetched fantasy, it already happened when Nest acquired a home automation company called Revolv, then decided to quietly leave its customers out in the cold when it couldn’t be bothered servicing its devices anymore.
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Old 2016-07-14, 07:55   #29
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Nice article.

The profiles these companies build up about all of us are not just going to be used for targeted advertising, as such articles often suggest, but will in future (or even now?) determine which jobs each of us is offered, how high our insurance premiums are, even the prices we are quoted whenever we want to buy something on the internet.
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Old 2016-07-14, 08:26   #30
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It boggles mind mind to think why would anyone buy something that ultimately requires a third party to stay in business so that the new crap shiny thing can function. Why would anyone actually want some remote for-profit company to be in control of the devices they buy? It just doesn't make sense to me.

Your lights are no longer supported, please purchase a new set with updated security features at the following URL ...

Well, if I'd not bought the stupid "smart" lights then I wouldn't even need updated security features in the first place. It is technology that only exists to support itself. And when the company controlling them wants to make more money they just make them obsolete and demand you buy the newer shinier model with even more monitoring and tracking built in.
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Old 2016-07-14, 09:01   #31
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At the moment, a remote for-profit company is in control of everything in your house; you have little feedback to the power company, if they decide you haven't paid them and cut you off, off you are cut.

This situation is acceptable because power companies are heavily regulated in what they can charge and in the circumstances in which they are permitted to cut customers off. IoT only really makes sense if regulated to at least that degree - Nest files a request with the Department of Commerce to be allowed to discontinue support for v1.0 thermometers, and the Department of Commerce may well say either 'no' or 'yes, on the single small condition that you replace the v1.0 thermometers with v3.0 thermometers at the customer's request and at your expense'.

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Old 2016-07-14, 09:53   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fivemack View Post
At the moment, a remote for-profit company is in control of everything in your house; you have little feedback to the power company, if they decide you haven't paid them and cut you off, off you are cut.
Okay, sure for the average house owner without a backup generator. But it is different in that the power company can't simply permanently disable your equipment on a whim (ignoring the prospect of generating a huge voltage surge designed to destroy your stuff and probably burn down your house also), and they can't even know what equipment you connect to the power supply.

If you buy a standard "dumb" toaster from Toaster Corp China Limited and use it in your house, from then after you don't have to ask permission from Toaster Corp China Limited every time you want to some tasty grilled bread products, just cook and ... yummy.

But, if instead you buy a "smart" toaster from Uber Trendy Toasters Incorporated, now you have to worry that Uber Trendy Toasters Incorporated doesn't go out of business, or decide that you are not worthy, or that you didn't see enough ads today, or that after every 100 uses you must pay another $10, or your Internet is down, or any of countless other reasons why your toaster might not work not related to a physical failure, and you only get to eat cold bread today.

Both of those scenarios require regular power provided from your local power company.

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Old 2016-07-15, 08:02   #33
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Not the same, by far. For the electricity company you didn't pay a "one time fee" when you "bought" your subscription. Same as for radio, cable tv, mobile net, etc. You pay periodically, keeping them in business. They provide you energy, signal, whatever, for which you pay. As long as you need their "products" (services) you pay, and they stay in business. Their interest is not to disconnect you, just because they don't like your face. This additional to regulations. With IoT devices manufacturers (we are one of them too, here where I make my daily bread), they can easily sell you the shit and disappear. They don't make more money from you after they sold you the shit, unless outsmarting you into buying a new shit. So, things are fundamentally different (i.e. from the foundations of it). As it is now, it is more advantageous for the manufacturers of those things to sell you the crap and disappear, like unregulated forex brokers which disappear after you deposit the money... The regulation is very important. It will come, in time. But is not the only thing. The foundation of it has to be changed too.

Last fiddled with by LaurV on 2016-07-15 at 08:09
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