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Old 2017-06-04, 02:34   #78
chalsall
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Originally Posted by science_man_88 View Post
probably but I don't know too much about all the subsystems
With all sincerity, perhaps linking off to a video is not the best addition to a CV.

You seem like a smart guy. It seems like less than smart people only learn from videos.

You might find a great deal of enjoyment (and good references) by spending a little bit of time volunteering at a library.

Doing physical work, and working with indexed atoms, can be really cool.
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Old 2017-06-04, 02:43   #79
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With all sincerity, perhaps linking off to a video is not the best addition to a CV.

You seem like a smart guy. It seems like less than smart people only learn from videos.

You might find a great deal of enjoyment (and good references) by spending a little bit of time volunteering at a library.

Doing physical work, and working with indexed atoms, can be really cool.
I've helped out at libraries before, during grades 8-12 actually at the school's I went to. That's why I don't need to be told 500's are natural sciences, 300's are social sciences, 700's are arts and crafts ( things as diverse as music, knitting and crochet, sewing) related, 600's are the applied sciences, ... I'll admit I don't know the contact information for the references but they are also approaching 10 years old.
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Old 2017-06-04, 02:54   #80
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I've helped out at libraries before, during grades 8-12 actually at the school's I went to. That's why I don't need to be told 500's are natural sciences...
If you have done that before, why don't you do it again?

Some people think that filing is trivial and worthless. It's not; it's much more difficult and worth-full than anyone who has never done it thinks.
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Old 2017-06-04, 10:27   #81
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If you have done that before, why don't you do it again?

Some people think that filing is trivial and worthless. It's not; it's much more difficult and worth-full than anyone who has never done it thinks.
because without a certificate it's all I can do is volunteer. I'm looking for things that don't need a certificate, make me at least enough money to get back and forth to them (at $2 per ticket that's about $4 a day in transportation cost or rounding hours about 2 hours at the reduced after tax minimum wage I would effectively get on the system).

Last fiddled with by science_man_88 on 2017-06-04 at 11:02
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Old 2017-06-05, 23:18   #82
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It's often described as the tax you would pay on one additional dollar of income. In a progressive tax system, it is greater than to your effective tax rate.
I would argue that technically speaking in the bottom tax bracket you won't have this result as the tax rate stays the same through the whole first bracket until capital gains etc. are considered. which then fall under https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_gains_tax#Canada I think.edit: if you combine both federal and provincial rates into one rate NS has the following percentages

up to 29590 23.79%
on rest up to 45916 29.95%
on rest up to 59180 35.45%
on rest up to 91831 37.17%
on rest up to 93000 42.67%
on rest up to 142353 43.5%
on rest up to 150000 46.5%
on rest up to 202800 50%
on rest over 202800 54%

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Old 2017-06-05, 23:35   #83
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I'm looking for things that don't need a certificate, make me at least enough money to get back and forth to them.
Why don't you consider gardening for your neighbours? Or, anything else you enjoy and are good at which doesn't require certification.

A very important thing I've learnt (over my many years) is that one should never do anything they hate just for the money. And, equally important, that many employers that I might want to work for are as equally interested in experience and attitude than "paper".

I almost didn't graduate from high-school because I couldn't spell. And I never got an undergraduate degree from UVIc (two years completed) because industry lured me away.

Years later I was invited back to UVic to teach. And, separately, I often found that my employees who hadn't graduated from high-school were better producers than those who had PhDs.

Last fiddled with by chalsall on 2017-06-05 at 23:36 Reason: s/require calcification/require certification/; # Damn smell-checker!
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Old 2017-06-06, 00:20   #84
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I would argue that technically speaking in the bottom tax bracket you won't have this result as the tax rate stays the same through the whole first bracket
Right -- in the lowest tax bracket, the tax system is often (locally) proportional rather than progressive or regressive. In the US the very lowest earners pay no tax, which is clearly proportional. Once you make more than (roughly) the standard deduction, $6,350 in 2017, you start paying 10% federal tax on the amount above that, which means that your effective tax rate goes from just above 0% if you make just more than this amount to nearly 6% when you make $15,675, which is the top of the 10% bracket plus the standard deduction. (Of course you might be able to take a deduction larger than the standard deduction, in which case your effective tax rate would be lower.) So in the US, above a very low income, federal income tax is progressive.

I wouldn't talk about capital gains here, which are entirely unrelated. If you and your neighbor both earn $1000, you'll both have to pay income tax on your $1000. Let's say you both pay $100 so you each have $900. If your neighbor spends the $900, she may pay sales tax on the goods purchased, but that's it. If you invest the $900 and eventually sell it for $1100, you'll pay capital gains tax on the $200, even though you already paid the income tax on the original money (and even though you'll pay sales tax on what you buy). That's not to say it's good or bad, just that it's a different thing, not related to income tax, since the invested money is already post-tax.
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Old 2017-06-06, 00:27   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CRGreathouse View Post
Right -- in the lowest tax bracket, the tax system is often (locally) proportional rather than progressive or regressive. In the US the very lowest earners pay no tax, which is clearly proportional. Once you make more than (roughly) the standard deduction, $6,350 in 2017, you start paying 10% federal tax on the amount above that, which means that your effective tax rate goes from just above 0% if you make just more than this amount to nearly 6% when you make $15,675, which is the top of the 10% bracket plus the standard deduction. (Of course you might be able to take a deduction larger than the standard deduction, in which case your effective tax rate would be lower.) So in the US, above a very low income, federal income tax is progressive.

I wouldn't talk about capital gains here, which are entirely unrelated. If you and your neighbor both earn $1000, you'll both have to pay income tax on your $1000. Let's say you both pay $100 so you each have $900. If your neighbor spends the $900, she may pay sales tax on the goods purchased, but that's it. If you invest the $900 and eventually sell it for $1100, you'll pay capital gains tax on the $200, even though you already paid the income tax on the original money (and even though you'll pay sales tax on what you buy). That's not to say it's good or bad, just that it's a different thing, not related to income tax, since the invested money is already post-tax.
TFSA's aren't taxed at all here to my knowledge and RRSP contributions and gains are deductible from taxable income but withdraws from the RRSP's ( or RRIF's if you make it that long) are taxed at marginal rate ( which lowers once you become retiree if the financial literacy class I had at one of my placements is still proper in my head).
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Old 2017-06-06, 10:28   #86
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normal Job pool

after degree is told to not be in the listing Job pool

Last fiddled with by science_man_88 on 2017-06-06 at 10:44
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Old 2017-06-06, 11:49   #87
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if I set it to be directly in the city, say "no degree" in the ad not be part of the Canadian summer job program (which I don't qualify for) and don't use the word driver or vehicle it's down to 8 once I eliminate the ones needing experience I get 2 both of which need steel toe boots. a garbage truck loader, or a moving helper. edit: And only the moving helper one doesn't seem to require your own transportation.

Last fiddled with by science_man_88 on 2017-06-06 at 12:01
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Old 2018-05-23, 20:12   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chalsall View Post
Given a spreadsheet program (Excel, LibraOffice, et al) compute the 12 by 12 times table.

Those who are good only need to enter one number ("1") in A1, and every other cell is a formula.

The really good ones can complete this exercise in less than sixty seconds.
The constant one in A1 is not necessary. =row() or =column() will do as well. And since that formula can be copied and used elsewhere, there's a time savings.
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