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Old 2021-10-08, 16:58   #89
xilman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
I did not know that! Lucky for me, I'm not too old to learn.

Botanists use the term "rays" for what the rest of us call "petals" on composite flowers like daisies. The actual flowers are in the "eye" or "button" in the center.
Thank you!

I am also not too old to learn.
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Old 2021-10-08, 21:19   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
Who is this "we" Kemosabe?

A fair fraction of people can see a little way into the uv, far enough to see the uv-coloured tips on daisy petals for instance. To me they are far from obvious but visible under careful examination when they appear as a very faint lavender-grey colour.
I didn't know that either! How can I test my own uv vision?

Safely, of course.
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Old 2021-10-08, 21:32   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenskull View Post
Hello! :)

Try this color perception test and put here your results.
https://www.xrite.com/hue-test
I scored a 2.
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Old 2021-10-08, 21:34   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilF View Post
I didn't know that either! How can I test my own uv vision?

Safely, of course.
Most people are trichromats. But some part has tetrachromatic vision. I admit that they are the ones who can see a little further than violet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrachromacy

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilF View Post
I scored a 2.
Pay attention to which part of the spectrum is the error.

Last fiddled with by greenskull on 2021-10-08 at 21:36
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Old 2022-07-22, 02:32   #93
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The International Union for Conservation of Nature has put the migratory Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) populations in North America on its "Red List" of threatened species, meaning these populations are in danger of extinction. This is in many news articles, such as this one.

The Fish and Wildlife Service is still punting on listing the Monarch under the Endangered Species Act, as described previously in this post.

This year, the Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) in my back yard came up in much larger colonies than last year and bloomed really well. (It spreads by underground runners.)

Unfortunately, this year has been a poor one for Monarchs, and in fact for just about every kind of butterfly. Last year there were plenty of Monarchs, but not many of other butterflies. This year, there have been very few Monarchs as well as very few of most species. The only butterflies I've seen in goodly numbers are some small blue butterflies (probably either Spring Azure or Sooty Azure), and another small butterfly, the Gray Hairstreak, which was all over my Butterfly Weed when it was blooming. I have had maybe half a dozen Monarch sightings, including one female laying eggs on my milkweed.

The similarity of the Viceroy butterfly (Limenitis archippus) to the Monarch is close enough to fool journalists. Attached is a photo from the above-linked article, with the caption

Plants such as milkweed, pictured here with a monarch, are important for sustaining lifecycles of monarch butterflies. The insects are endangered by loss of habitat, the use of herbicides and pesticides, and climate change. (Michael Charles Cole/CBC)
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Last fiddled with by Dr Sardonicus on 2022-07-22 at 02:34 Reason: formatting
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Old 2022-10-30, 20:25   #94
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On October 29, 2022, as I was doing some fall cleanup of my dead and dying plant stalks, I saw two Cloudless Sulphur butterflies (Phoebis sennae) feeding ("nectaring") on my petunias. They stayed around for at least half an hour, mostly flying in a leisurely manner around the petunias and feeding, but sometimes "dogfighting" each other in the air.

I had only seen single specimens before, and they always seemed to be in a hurry. They would fly very quickly; and if they stopped at all, would land either on a flower or on the ground, and quickly take off, and not return. However, the weather was cool (around 57 F or 14 C) which would of course slow them down, and my petunias were likely the only sizable nectar source for a long way around.

In late July or early August, the long-missing Painted Lady butterflies finally showed up in force, along with a goodly number of Common Buckeye butterflies, all attracted to the bright yellow and orange Cosmos I had planted.

The Painted Ladies have stayed around, feeding on the few remaining flowers in my back yard.

Even so, the numbers of all sorts of butterflies have been very low around here this year. I have heard a few reports of many butterflies in locales not too far from here, but mostly people have noticed how few there have been.

This is especially true of Monarch butterflies. I saw very few this summer. One man who gathers caterpillars from his milkweed patch as they're getting ready to pupate, and releases the adults as they emerge from the chrysalises, said he had released 48 adult Monarchs last year, but only three this year.
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Old 2022-11-01, 18:26   #95
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Here is a female Monarch, one of about two dozen females and males that we raised this past summer. We had twice as many Monarchs this year vs. 2021.

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Old 2022-11-01, 22:57   #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richs View Post
Here is a female Monarch, one of about two dozen females and males that we raised this past summer. We had twice as many Monarchs this year vs. 2021.
Interesting... Are they pollinators?
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Old 2022-11-01, 23:02   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chalsall View Post
Interesting... Are they pollinators?
Yes, according to the US National Park Service: More than beautiful, monarch butterflies contribute to the health of our planet. While feeding on nectar, they pollinate many types of wildflowers.

See https://www.nps.gov/articles/monarch-butterfly.htm
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Old 2022-11-01, 23:06   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richs View Post
Yes.
Sincerely... Thank you for that.

We, Humans, think we are so very important.

We are ephemeral. By definition.
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Old 2022-11-03, 01:39   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richs View Post
Here is a female Monarch, one of about two dozen females and males that we raised this past summer. We had twice as many Monarchs this year vs. 2021.

Attachment 27563
That would be the Western migratory population. A year or two ago things looked really bleak for them. It's good to see some signs of improvement.

I live in the Eastern migratory population area, which was seldom seen around here this year.

Although I will mention that, while out on a walk today (November 2, 2022) I saw a Monarch butterfly in flight. It looked to be in good condition.

I also got a decent picture (copyrighted) of a Cloudless Sulphur on one of my petunias (attached).

Petunias blooming. Cloudless Sulphur butterflies flying around (plus cabbage whites, yellow and orange sulphurs, painted lady butterflies, some small skippers, and that monarch I just mentioned).

Wait a minute. This is November!
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