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Old 2022-07-14, 11:35   #89
mathwiz
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jzakiya View Post
If 10 or more people are interested
Nope.
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Old 2022-07-14, 19:43   #90
jzakiya
 
Jul 2014

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Here's a Quiz I created to help people focus, and get feedback on their basic understanding of PGT.
There are 20 simple questions, which if you understand PGT, are easy|quick to answer.
Only a few of them require any computations. It can be done in 5-10 minutes.
If you send me your Quiz results I'll let you know how you did.

https://www.academia.edu/75838729/On...nion_Test_Quiz
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Old 2022-07-14, 20:18   #91
bsquared
 
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This is a wheel sieve; a.k.a, sieving over residue classes. It is implemented in a compact form, which is nice, but there is no ground-breaking theory here.

Post the segmented version of the sieve... the one you have here is not competitive as-is. Also, if you try it, I think you'll find that the difficult part is keeping it fast when you are finding primes in ranges up around 10^18. This is where primesieve truly shines.
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Old 2022-07-14, 22:04   #92
jzakiya
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsquared View Post
This is a wheel sieve; a.k.a, sieving over residue classes. It is implemented in a compact form, which is nice, but there is no ground-breaking theory here.

Post the segmented version of the sieve... the one you have here is not competitive as-is. Also, if you try it, I think you'll find that the difficult part is keeping it fast when you are finding primes in ranges up around 10^18. This is where primesieve truly shines.
1) This is not a "wheel sieve" as it's defined.
It stays completely within the domain of the residues, and is not part of a greater sieve approach.

2) "..but there is no ground-breaking theory here"
I've seen nothing that even comes close to the math and logic of PGT that explains (literally), everything about the distribution and characteristics of primes.

3) "Post the segmented version of the sieve"
Please read the thread. The paper and code (in 6 languages for both Twin and Cousin Primes) has been posted multiple times.

4) "the difficult part is keeping it fast ..up around 10^18..where primesieve truly shines."
Primesieve is excellent software, well written and maintained. But if you look at its (humongous) code base, it's really 3 different algorithm implementations for small, medium, and large values within 64-bits, and its goals are much broader, and it's been developed for a much, much longer time.

If you read my papers (which it seems you haven't) I explain where the coding implementations can be improved. But that's an "engineering" consideration. The math of PGT is the most efficient|simple there is to characterize and find all the primes, of all types (Twins, Cousins, Sexys, Mersennes, etc).

I notice you say nothing of the performance difference below 10^18, where it's shown the SSoZ is much faster, with only a fraction of the code size (one short file). Plus, my SSoZ implementations give you the largest Prime in the region of interest (for free), which Primesieve doesn't.

My first paper on this was released in 2008 (14 years ago atow, July, 14, 2022). Everything about my knowledge and development of the math, theory, and coding has improved, and I expect that to continue. It's been implemented by a number of people, in various languages, and has over and over been shown to empirically work, i.e. provide correct results, very fast.

I don't consider my work to be in competition with Primesieve, or any others. It stands on its own. I think people should understand it, use it where applicable|desirable, and it should be taught in academic institutions.
Ultimately it will, because it answers questions, and provides deep understanding about the framework of primes, other methods can't, or not as easily and clearly.
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Old 2022-07-15, 20:19   #93
jzakiya
 
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As a further example of the utility, and power, of PGT let's see how its use creates a conceptually,
as well as mathematically, simple(r) understanding of this following topic.

This is an expansion of the explanation on this topic provided to a questioner, David Gustavsson my video here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCUiPknHtfY

In the wikipedia article on Polignac's Conjecture (which I prove is true).

https://wiki2.org/en/Polignac%27s_conjecture

It presents C_{2}, called the twin primes constant, defined as follows:

<br />
C_{2}=\prod _{p\geq 3}{\frac {p(p-2)}{(p-1)^{2}}}\approx 0.660161815846869573927812110014\dots<br />

where the product extends over all prime numbers p ≥ 3.

But this value is off by a factor of 2, because the sequence should start with p=2, the first prime.

The expression for C_{2} is a sequence of multiplied numbers having the same forms I use if written as:

C_{2} = 2*p\sharp * (p-2)\sharp / (p-1)\sharp ^{2}, for primes p > 2 (the odd primes).

If you include for p=2 then it would becomes:

C_{2} = p\sharp (p-2)\sharp /(p-1)\sharp ^{2} for all p, where (2-2)\sharp = (2-1)\sharp = 1

and thus for p=2, C_{2} = [2\sharp (0)\sharp /(1\sharp)^{2}] = 2(1)/(1) = 2

where these primorial expressions are computed as follows, here upto P23 (from my paper).

For P23 modulus: modp23 = (p-0)# = 2 * 3 * 5 * 7 * 11 * 13 * 17 * 19 * 23 = 223092870
For P23 residues: rescount = (p-1)# = 1 * 2 * 4 * 6 * 10 * 12 * 16 * 18 * 22 = 36495360
For P23 twins|cousin: pairs = (p-2)# = 1 * 1 * 3 * 5 * 9 * 11 * 15 * 17 * 21 = 7952175

So I'm extending the notation to include p=2 into the thought process,
to fully characterizes how all the primes (and their gaps) contribute to the structure of Prime Generators.

So let's analyze C_{2}, et al, from the perspective of Prime Generator Theory (PGT).

The article states:

"For example, C_{4} = C_{2} and C_{6} = 2C_{2}. Twin primes have the same conjectured density as cousin primes, and half that of sexy primes."

In fact, PGT shows (visually and empirically) why the number of residue gaps of 2 and 4 are equal and odd,
and their gap frequency coefficients are: a_{1} = a_{2} = (p-2)\sharp

Thus empirically for C_{2} using PGT:

p\sharp(p-2)\sharp / (p-1)\sharp ^{2} is the ratio of modpn*pairscntpn / rescntpn^{2}.

But PGT conceptually tells you this is really the product of 2 ratios (physical mathematical realities):

r_{1} = modpn / rescntpn = p_{n}\sharp / (p_{n} - 1)\sharp

Which is a metric defining a normalized rate of expansion of the primes as the number line is broken into larger groups of modpn size.

and

r_{2} = pairscntpn / rescntpn = (p_{n} - 2)\sharp / (p_{n} - 1)\sharp

Which defines a countervailing rate of decrease in the number space, for the number of twin|cousin residue pairs over the total number of residues.

Thus Prime Generator Theory (PGT) not only gives a similar (correct) empirical expressions classical Number Theory does,
it actually provides the framework to conceptually understand, and explain structurally, what is going on.

And the number of Pn residue gaps of 6 has the recursion relationship: a_{3} = a_{3}^{'}(pn-3) + a_{2}^{'} + a_{1}^{'}

where the a^{'} coefficient values are for the preceding Pn generator, and pn the prime value for the current Pn generator.

So the whole field of Prime Number Theory needs to be reevaluated, and analyzed, using PGT.
It would certainly be much easier for students to learn, and also much easier, and simpler, for people to teach.

Now it becomes easy to understand, and show, how as the normalized bandwidth primes expansion rate r_{1} increases by p,
the number space percentage containing possible twin|cousin primes is decreased by p.

So r_{1} will grow without end (slowly), while r_{2} decreases to near zero without end.
Their product for C_{2} will approach a more stable equilibrium as more primes p are used.

Here is a short Ruby program (using my primes-utils RubyGem) to compute their values for the first 1,000 primes.
You can modify it to compute their values for whatever number of primes you have memory|time to compute.

Code:
require "primes/utils" # Load primes-utils RubyGem (need to install on system first)

# Get 1,000th prime value (its 7919)"

p1000 = 1000.nthprime

# Create array of first 1,000 primes"

primes1000 = p1000.primes

# Compute ratios: r1, r2, and c2, and print values for every 100th prime
# To make code easy, initialize values for first prime p=2

r1, r2, c2 = 2, 1, 2

# Start using array primes for p=3, i.e. primes1000[1]

primes1000[1..].each_with_index do |p, i|
   p_1 = (p - 1).to_f          # make integer value for p floating point
   r1 = (r1 *  p   ) / p_1     # update r1 for current prime
   r2 = (r2 * (p-2)) / p_1     # update r2 for current prime
   c2 = r1 * r2                # update c2 for current prime
   pth_prime = i + 2           # prmth val for current prime
   if pth_prime % 100 == 0     # if prmth value a multiple of 100 output results
      puts "\nUpto #{pth_prime}th prime #{p}"
      puts "r1 = #{r1} \nr2 = #{r2} \nC2 = #{c2} \n"
   end
end
And output for the first 1,000 primes.

Code:
Upto 100th prime 541
r1 = 11.267620389582685
r2 = 0.117208472127214
C2 = 1.3206605703724303

Upto 200th prime 1223
r1 = 12.714305399732526
r2 = 0.10385598009615431
C2 = 1.3204566485310485

Upto 300th prime 1987
r1 = 13.55336218102954
r2 = 0.09742244361035737
C2 = 1.3204016628121005

Upto 400th prime 2741
r1 = 14.143788321617125
r2 = 0.09335387299959709
C2 = 1.3203774187094295

Upto 500th prime 3571
r1 = 14.600162046719854
r2 = 0.09043488777762677
C2 = 1.3203640162302757

Upto 600th prime 4409
r1 = 14.97268389297606
r2 = 0.08818429692348541
C2 = 1.3203556021596883

Upto 700th prime 5279
r1 = 15.285994047978852
r2 = 0.08637645148081055
C2 = 1.3203499232212041

Upto 800th prime 6133
r1 = 15.556739346163312
r2 = 0.08487291685854093
C2 = 1.320345845116911

Upto 900th prime 6997
r1 = 15.79552976103645
r2 = 0.08358964822246509
C2 = 1.3203427762125148

Upto 1000th prime 7919
r1 = 16.008556779361957
r2 = 0.08247716653126569
C2 = 1.3203404034166584
This is just a taste of what you can do with PGT, if applied correctly.

Prime numbers don't occur randomly!!

When you break the number line into even number groups, the best size being primorials,
the primes are distributed evenly along the residues within the group.

So for every prime, you always know where it is for a given group size (modpn),
because you can always parameterize its residue value r and residue group value k.

And from this simple, observable, structure, you can learn everything there is to know about primes.
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Old 2022-07-18, 14:30   #94
Rustum
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jzakiya View Post
Prime numbers don't occur randomly!

When you break the number line into even number groups, the best size being primorials,
the primes are distributed evenly along the residues within the group.

So for every prime, you always know where it is for a given group size (modpn),
because you can always parameterize its residue value r and residue group value k.

And from this simple, observable, structure, you can learn everything there is to know about primes.
In these claims, "primes" should be replaced by "prime candidates". The prime candidates generated by the "P5 generator" 10*k + [1,7,11,13,17,19,23,29], with 1 excluded when k = 0, contain all primes > 5, but they also include composite integers. Once the composites are crossed out using some scheme, the patterns in the list of primes that is left are not what one should call "random", but there is no "simple, observable, structure".

Here is the counterevidence. The attached screenshot shows a list of candidate primes up to about 1,000 that were generated using the "P5 generator", with the composites crossed out.

Here is the Fortran program that I used to generate the output in the screenshot. It uses ANSI escape sequences to cross out the composite numbers in the display.

Code:
program p5show
implicit none
integer i,j,k,pc,nrej,npr
integer :: r(8)    = [1,7,11,13,17,19,23,29]
integer :: spr(12) = [2,3,5,7,11,13,17,19,23,29,31,37] !primes <= isqrt(N_max)
logical :: comp
character(4) :: sb,se
sb = char(27)//'[9m'
se = char(27)//'[0m'
npr = 0
print *,'  k                    Candidates 30*k+r(1:8)               # rejected'
print *
do k = 0,33
   write(*,'(I4,4x)',advance='no')k
   nrej = 0
   do j = 1,8
      pc = 30*k+r(j) ! prime candidate, "P5 generator"
      comp = any(mod(pc,spr)==0).and. .not.any(pc==spr)
      if(comp.or.(k==0.and.j==1))then !if candidate = 1 or is composite
         nrej = nrej+1
         write(*,'(2x,A,I4,A)',advance='no')sb,pc,se
      else ! tested to be prime
         write(*,'(2x,I4)',advance='no')pc
         npr = npr+1
      endif
   end do
   print '(7xi1)',nrej
end do
print '(/,I5,1x,A)',npr,' primes'
end program
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Old 2022-09-21, 19:52   #95
jzakiya
 
Jul 2014

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This is an info/data dump of what I've been working on during summer 2022.

In August 2022 I generated all the ai gap coefficients for P41 (it took 7 day, 6 hr, 27 mins, 48.298 secs)
This enabled me to confirm the recursive form for a1 - a7 produced correct results for it.
Code:
              P37                      P41
a1  =    217,929,355,875        8,499,244,879,125
a2  =    217,929,355,875        8,499,244,879,125
a3  =    293,920,842,950        11,604,850,743,850
a4  =    91,589,444,450         3,682,730,287,600
a5  =    108,861,586,050        4,396,116,829,650
a6  =    83,462,164,156         3,474,628,537,016
a7  =    34,861,119,734         1,475,437,583,074
a8  =    16,996,070,868         741,616,123,248
a9  =    21,218,333,416         949,982,718,776
a10 =    4,814,320,320          230,780,018,520
a11 =    5,454,179,550          252,605,556,450
a12 =    4,073,954,144          199,070,346,484
a13 =    918,069,454            47,895,816,494
a14 =    857,901,000            45,885,975,600
a15 =    535,673,924            31,307,108,764
a16 =    58,664,256             3,887,806,536
a17 =    69,404,898             4,391,607,498
a18 =    46,346,428             3,247,427,048
a19 =    7,381,190              606,169,690
a20 =    10,176,048             756,088,668
a21 =    4,153,336              363,563,276
a22 =    526,596                57,663,276
a23 =    291,342                32,658,714
a24 =    239,760                29,314,704
a25 =    91,392                 11,018,808
a26 =    8,912                  1,684,756
a27 =    25,320                 3,980,340
a28 =    2,952                  537,324
a29 =    1,654                  37,574
a30 =    452                    127,928
a31 =    26                     9,262
a32 =    48                     14,400
a33 =    24                     7,680
a34 =                           332
a35 =                           360
a36 =                           48
a37 =                           2
Recursive versions of ai gap coefficients I reduced.
Code:
a1  = a1'(pn-2)
a2  = a2'(pn-2)
a3  = a3'(pn-3) + a2'  +  a1'
a4  = a4'(pn-4) + a3'
a5  = a5'(pn-5) + 2*a4' + a3'
a6  = a6'(pn-5) + 6*a5' - 2*a4'
a7  = a7'(pn-7) + 3*a6' - 3*a5'  +  4*a4'
About 2020 I came across a Dec 2012 video by Russel Letkeman.
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...ussel+Letkemen

It's basically a guy reading a paper. I didn't bother to start looking
at it seriously until around July 2022. Then I searched and found the paper
he was reading, and in fact printed out his 4 vixra.org papers.

https://vixra.org/author/russell_letkeman
This paper was the one in the video - https://vixra.org/abs/1207.0071
He creates an algebra based on primorials which can generate the PG ai gap values.
(His vernacular is different than mine, so I convert his to mine for consistency).

Here are the Letkeman gap coefficients (based on reduced primorials).
I regenerated|corrected his values from scratch using his reduced primorial matrix method.
Code:
These are the one I've confirmed for the ai gaps upto P41.

a1  = [1]
a2  = [1]
a3  = [2, -2]
a4  = [1, -2, 1]
a5  = [4/3, -3, 2]
a6  = [2, -7, 10, -2]
a7  = [6/5, -5, 28/3, -3]
a8  = [1, -5, 12, -6, 1]
a9  = [2, -23/2, 100/3, -22, 6]
a10 = [4/3, -39/4, 116/3, -40, 24, -2]
a11 = [10/9, -63/8, 632/21, -175/6, 72/5]
a12 = [2, -17, 1738/21, -344/3, 108, -21]
a13 = [12/11, -209/20, 11090/189, -1563/16, 4224/35, -119/3, 28/5]
a14 = [6/5, -185/16, 456/7, -325/3, 662/5, -42, 16/3]

These I computed using P41 data, but need P43 and greater ai gaps data to confirm.
a15 = [8/3, -1207/40, 12986/63, -5221/12, 25376/35, -4285/12, 482/5, -45/4]
a16 = [293/297, -249/20, 6091/63, -953/4, 371/7, -609/2, 1727/15, -43/2]
a17 = [164924/155925, -4317/320, 20050/189, -76363/288, 19044/35, -41899/120, 668/5, -351/14]
It would be a good area of research to show how to convert the recursive ai gap forms into the
reduced primoral forms, and/or vice versa.

To do the computations you need a table of all the reduced primorials for each mth prime Pm.
I did the tables out to P47, here's the table for P23.

Reduced Primorials table for p23
Code:
r = 0:  (p-0)# = 2 * 3 * 5 * 7 * 11 * 13 * 17 * 19 * 23 = 223,092,870
r = 1:  (p-1)# = 1 * 2 * 4 * 6 * 10 * 12 * 16 * 18 * 22 = 36,495,360
r = 2:  (p-2)# = 1 * 1 * 3 * 5 *  9 * 11 * 15 * 17 * 21 = 7,952,175
r = 3:  (p-3)# =     1 * 2 * 4 *  8 * 10 * 14 * 16 * 20 = 2,867,200
r = 4:  (p-4)# =         1 * 3 *  7 *  9 * 13 * 15 * 19 = 700,245
r = 5:  (p-5)# =         1 * 2 *  6 *  8 * 12 * 14 * 18 = 290,304
r = 6:  (p-6)# =             1 *  5 *  7 * 11 * 13 * 17 = 85,085
r = 7:  (p-7)# =             1 *  4 *  6 * 10 * 12 * 16 = 46,080
r = 8:  (p-8)# =                  3 *  5 *  9 * 11 * 15 = 22,275
r = 9:  (p-9)# =                  2 *  4 *  8 * 10 * 14 = 8,960
r = 10: (p-10)# =                 1 *  3 *  7 *  9 * 13 = 2,457
r = 11: (p-11)# =                 1 *  2 *  6 *  8 * 12 = 1,152
r = 12: (p-12)# =                      1 *  5 *  7 * 11 = 385
r = 13: (p-13)# =                      1 *  4 *  6 * 10 = 240
r = 14: (p-14)# =                           3 *  5 *  9 = 135
r = 15: (p-15)# =                           2 *  4 *  8 = 64
r = 16: (p-16)# =                           1 *  3 *  7 = 21
r = 17: (p-17)# =                           1 *  2 *  6 = 12
r = 18: (p-18)# =                                1 *  5 = 5
r = 19: (p-19)# =                                1 *  4 = 4
r = 20: (p-20)# =                                     3 = 3
r = 21: (p-21)# =                                     2 = 2
r = 22: (p-22)# =                                     1 = 1
r = 23: (p-23)# =                                     1 = 1
Example ai gap calculation.

<br />
a_{i} ^ {m} = \sum_{r=1}^{R} c_{r} P_{m}^{-(r+1)}\sharp<br />

Thus to compute the gaps of size 16 for P23, use a8 = [1, -5, 12, -6, 1], as such.

Code:
P23_a8 = 1*(p23-2)#  - 5*(p23-3)#    + 12*(p23-4)#  - 6*(p23-5)#  + 1*(p23-6)#
       = (7,952,175) - 5*(2,867,200) + 12*(700,245) - 6*(290,304) + (85,085)
       = 362,376
This confirms for Prime Generator P23, it has 362,376 residue gaps of size 16.

Letkeman also realizes his method establishes the Infinity of Twin Primes.
He also establishes the frequency of the tuples {2,4} = {4,2} = (pm-3)# and they are atomic
as well as the tuple {2,4,6,2,6,4} = (5/2)(pm-7)#.

His papers are hard to read, if I didn't already know the larger framework he was trying to
model. (He doesn't conceptually recognize Prime Generators, and how his structures fit into them).

The key thing (for me) he showed how to model and compute all the possible residue tuple combinations for each Prime Generator (prime primorial modulus size), and show they are repeating patterns.

Last fiddled with by jzakiya on 2022-09-21 at 20:07
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Old 2022-09-21, 21:14   #96
mart_r
 
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you know...around...

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jzakiya View Post
In August 2022 I generated all the ai gap coefficients for P41 (it took 7 day, 6 hr, 27 mins, 48.298 secs)
This enabled me to confirm the recursive form for a1 - a7 produced correct results for it.
(...)
Been there, done that. See my post # 26 where I posted the program to do this in less than 0.01 seconds in Pari.

Code:
(22:52) gp > \rgaps_coprimes
syntax: gaps(g,p) = #gaps with size g (<=212 or <=2p) in set of integers mod p#
%1 = (g,p)->s=0;if(g%2==0,for(x=1,44,r=1;forprime(q=x+3,p,r*=(q-x-1));s+=a[g/2][x]*r*(-1)^(x+1));if(g==4&&p==2,s=0));if(nextprime(p+1)>g/2,s,0)

(22:53) gp > gaps(16,23)
%3 = 362376

(22:56) gp > forstep(g=2,74,2,print("gap: "g" - a"g/2"_P41 = "gaps(g,41)))
gap: 2 - a1_P41 = 8499244879125
gap: 4 - a2_P41 = 8499244879125
gap: 6 - a3_P41 = 11604850743850
gap: 8 - a4_P41 = 3682730287600
gap: 10 - a5_P41 = 4396116829650
gap: 12 - a6_P41 = 3474628537016
gap: 14 - a7_P41 = 1475437583074
gap: 16 - a8_P41 = 741616123248
gap: 18 - a9_P41 = 949982718776
gap: 20 - a10_P41 = 230780018520
gap: 22 - a11_P41 = 252605556450
gap: 24 - a12_P41 = 199070346484
gap: 26 - a13_P41 = 47895816494
gap: 28 - a14_P41 = 45885975600
gap: 30 - a15_P41 = 31307108764
gap: 32 - a16_P41 = 3887806536
gap: 34 - a17_P41 = 4391607498
gap: 36 - a18_P41 = 3247427048
gap: 38 - a19_P41 = 606169690
gap: 40 - a20_P41 = 756088668
gap: 42 - a21_P41 = 363563276
gap: 44 - a22_P41 = 57663276
gap: 46 - a23_P41 = 32658714
gap: 48 - a24_P41 = 29314704
gap: 50 - a25_P41 = 11018808
gap: 52 - a26_P41 = 1684756
gap: 54 - a27_P41 = 3980340
gap: 56 - a28_P41 = 537324
gap: 58 - a29_P41 = 371574
gap: 60 - a30_P41 = 127928
gap: 62 - a31_P41 = 9262
gap: 64 - a32_P41 = 14400
gap: 66 - a33_P41 = 7680
gap: 68 - a34_P41 = 332
gap: 70 - a35_P41 = 360
gap: 72 - a36_P41 = 48
gap: 74 - a37_P41 = 2
(22:56) gp > ##
  ***   last result computed in 0 ms.
(22:56) gp >
If you read this thread from post # 17 onwards you will find (almost) all the numerical information you're looking for.
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Old 2022-09-23, 18:44   #97
jzakiya
 
Jul 2014

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Hey mart_r, thanks for the post.

I hadn't even heard of Pari before, so I downloaded it and installed yesterday.
I still don't know how to use it, but that's a learning process. :-)

Can you do me a favor and generate the residue gaps for P43, P47..for as many as you feel like doing.
That data will really help me refine and extend PGT empirically.

I'm still looking at the other posts you gave for the coefficient values.
That will save me allot of work, and corroborates what I've already done.

One thing that still perplexes me is why people don't understand (seemingly besides Letkeman)
this data empirically establishes the validity of Polignacs's Conjecture, of which the Twin Primes Conjecture
is just the specific case for primes pairs that differ by 2.

As you use more and more consecutive primes for a generator's modulus size Pm#, the number of
new consecutive primes from r0 to r0^2 grows, and their gap spacing (and group tuples) grow
without end, and will contain every possible gap|tuple combination possible as m -> infinity.

If fact, for Twin and Cousin Primes, whose residues gap sizes for any m primes is: a1 = a2 = (pm-2)#
and can be computed and estimated for any Pm# generator, they obviously always increase in frequency
and can never hit some final end value! There is no way there can be some last Twin|Cousin Prime pair.

It's just as simple as that!

As one great man said: One of the hardest thing to do is to get people to accept the obvious!
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Old 2022-09-23, 19:14   #98
mathwiz
 
Mar 2019

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jzakiya View Post
One thing that still perplexes me is why people don't understand (seemingly besides Letkeman)
this data empirically establishes the validity of Polignacs's Conjecture, of which the Twin Primes Conjecture
is just the specific case for primes pairs that differ by 2.
How can data "empirically establish" the Twin Primes conjecture? With a finite amount of data, you cannot prove the infinitude of twin primes.

You can make claims like "well it sure looks like there will be!" But that's not a proof.
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Old 2022-09-23, 19:16   #99
Batalov
 
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Mar 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jzakiya View Post
One thing that still perplexes me is why people don't understand (seemingly besides Letkeman)
this data empirically establishes the validity ...
Because most people don't like hearing word salad. "data empirically establishes the validity" is word salad. You just put some words that have nothing to do with each other together in one sentence. That doesn't make that salad a meaningful sentence, much less proves anything.

Listen carefully to the last lines in this demonstration
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