mersenneforum.org  

Go Back   mersenneforum.org > Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search > Math

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2007-12-24, 06:58   #1
devarajkandadai
 
devarajkandadai's Avatar
 
May 2004

13C16 Posts
Default Another generalised RH?

The Generalised Riemann Hypothesis


Just as 0 is a point of collective convergence for infinitely
many points on the critical line, 1 seems to be a point of collective convergence for many points in the region to the right of 1 on the co-axial plane.

This seems evident from the following program in pari:

Let s= 2 +3*I.

{p(k)=zeta( 2 + 3*I +k*zeta(2+3*I))}

for(k=1,200,print p(k)))



(Incidentally I thank Maxal for giving me preliminary training in programming in pari).

In the above the collective convergence seems to commence from k=

125(approx) onwards.

Needless to say the value of k when collective convergence

commences differs for differenct values of s.

In short, for 0 the critical line is 1/2;for 1, the critical region

is the portion of the axial plane to the right of 1.Are there other

points of collective convergence?

Last fiddled with by devarajkandadai on 2007-12-24 at 07:00
devarajkandadai is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Script for Recognised Generalised Fermat sequence A^2+1 pepi37 Linux 0 2016-02-29 11:57
Generalised Cunningham Chains robert44444uk Open Projects 12 2013-08-24 07:42
ECM on small Generalised Fermat numbers geoff Factoring 23 2010-09-13 23:50
Generalised Impure Prune Deposits fivemack Math 2 2007-07-18 20:43

All times are UTC. The time now is 02:24.

Sun Jan 24 02:24:47 UTC 2021 up 51 days, 22:36, 0 users, load averages: 1.64, 1.72, 1.90

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

This forum has received and complied with 0 (zero) government requests for information.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.
A copy of the license is included in the FAQ.