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Old 2014-08-20, 17:17   #23
retina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMawn View Post
There is the occasional person who understands that flooring the gas pedal on a slippery surface doesn't help and that your best bet is "as fast as you can without slipping" and that any additional speed past the initial slip point is meaningless.
There are some other driving "tricks" also.

Extra credit to those that can spot the following situations:

1) Applying pressure to the accelerator pedal to reduce speed.
2) Applying pressure to the brake pedal to increase speed.

By "applying pressure" I mean what would one would normally do when using the pedals by pressing forwards/down on them.
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Old 2014-08-20, 17:20   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
1) Applying pressure to the accelerator pedal to reduce speed.
what is on don't drive here episode Nairobi but there were only metal pieces sticking out to put your feet on. I'm guessing this would be to shift the weight back onto the driving wheels of a rear wheel drive ?

Last fiddled with by science_man_88 on 2014-08-20 at 17:21
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Old 2014-08-20, 17:24   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by science_man_88 View Post
what is on don't drive here episode Nairobi but there were only metal pieces sticking out to put your feet on. I'm guessing this would be to shift the weight back onto the driving wheels of a rear wheel drive ?
No. That technique is to improve cornering by reducing the load on the front outer wheel. Most definitely that would be to increase speed around the corner.
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Old 2014-08-20, 17:42   #26
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Originally Posted by Brian-E View Post
This, I think, was also Scienceman's point, and it seems natural to me too.

Slightly related is the point that usually, in an emergency situation where you have the choice of stopping dead in your tracks or swerving, the former is safer. A driver who isn't wearing a seatbelt may be more inclined to try to steer instead of braking.
I see drivers trying to slow/stop to prevent an accident (e.g. because the car in front of them stopped faster than expected/they weren't paying attention) often swerve slightly to the left or right. Presumably, this gives them more distance to stop before hitting the other car, and allows the possibility that they can go around the car (and the car behind them can swerve the other way, to go around that car) - something like creating extra lanes on the fly.
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Originally Posted by retina View Post
Extra credit to those that can spot the following situations:

1) Applying pressure to the accelerator pedal to reduce speed.
When your gear is the opposite direction of where you're actually traveling? (i.e. in drive and going backwards, or going forwards while in reverse)

Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
2) Applying pressure to the brake pedal to increase speed.
Let's say your front wheels have lifted off the ground, and they are drive wheels (FWD or AWD). Braking can force them back down, so that you can accelerate again. This scenario only seems likely in racing motorcycles and dragsters, but hey...

I'm wondering if you have more interesting answers in mind.

Last fiddled with by Mini-Geek on 2014-08-20 at 17:46
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Old 2014-08-20, 18:05   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-Geek View Post
When your gear is the opposite direction of where you're actually traveling? (i.e. in drive and going backwards, or going forwards while in reverse)
I would expect your wheels are already skidding (backwards) if you have released the clutch and the gear is opposite to your travelling direction so in that case applying more fuel is unlikely to have any effect. But I would hate to think what would break when you released the clutch.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-Geek View Post
Let's say your front wheels have lifted off the ground, and they are drive wheels (FWD or AWD). Braking can force them back down, so that you can accelerate again. This scenario only seems likely in racing motorcycles and dragsters, but hey...
No, applying the brake pedal must be the only impetus that increases your speed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-Geek View Post
I'm wondering if you have more interesting answers in mind.
Definitely. And more practical also.

Edit: BTW I'm talking about situations where using the above techniques improves control of the vehicle while also having the desired effect of speed changes.

Last fiddled with by retina on 2014-08-20 at 18:08
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Old 2014-08-20, 19:01   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
Edit: BTW I'm talking about situations where using the above techniques improves control of the vehicle while also having the desired effect of speed changes.
Just wondering... How many know how to drive "standards" rather than "automatics" now-a-days? And know how to work them optimally?

I don't know about you, but I find it almost impossible to buy a vehicle with a standard drive (read: a stick-shift and a clutch pedal).
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Old 2014-08-20, 19:28   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chalsall View Post
Just wondering... How many know how to drive "standards" rather than "automatics" now-a-days? And know how to work them optimally?

I don't know about you, but I find it almost impossible to buy a vehicle with a standard drive (read: a stick-shift and a clutch pedal).
I don't know about you but I find it very easy to buy a vehicle (and a not just a two-wheeled vehicle) with a manual transmission. I drive / ride one on a daily basis and upgrading either would be easy though not at presently justified on economic grounds.

Actually, I may know about you --- on the assumption that you're being truthful in your assertion.
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Old 2014-08-21, 01:42   #30
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I already know which car I want to buy when the money starts rolling in and I find myself actually needing a car. And it comes in manual

I enjoy driving manual more than automatic. As for driving it "optimally," well, I would have to drive it a bit and maybe guess as to how far off I might be. Right now my experience with manual is maybe 10 hours worth of city driving in a '75 MG B.

I might not drive it "optimally" but I'm the only one in the family who can successfully find both third gear and fourth gear > 80% of the time (mom thinks fourth is really had and dad thinks third is really hard).

Last fiddled with by TheMawn on 2014-08-21 at 01:51
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Old 2014-08-21, 01:51   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
Extra credit to those that can spot the following situations:

1) Applying pressure to the accelerator pedal to reduce speed.
2) Applying pressure to the brake pedal to increase speed.
1) If you're in exceptionally gooey terrain mashing the accelerator could cause your wheels to lose their grip. Then, instead of helping you to propel forward, the wheels are useless and slow you down as they plow through the mud or sand.

2) Downhill on an icy slope, the friction between your wheels and the ice might control your speed whereas if they were suddenly locked, the lack of friction allows you to accelerate faster under the force of gravity.
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Old 2014-08-21, 02:11   #32
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Quote:
1) If you're in exceptionally gooey terrain mashing the accelerator could cause your wheels to lose their grip. Then, instead of helping you to propel forward, the wheels are useless and slow you down as they plow through the mud or sand.
Like as not, you will come to a full stop when your drive wheels dig themselves holes.
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Old 2014-08-21, 03:26   #33
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Fair enough. How about something like gravel?

Those are just the best answers I could come up with. I really can't think of any actual situation where you would mash the gas pedal to slow down. Unless you were in that elusive situation where braking would make you go faster but 99.9% of people would probably die if that situation ever cropped up. I'm pretty sure my first thought after speeding up when stepping on the brakes wouldn't be to step on the gas.

Last fiddled with by TheMawn on 2014-08-21 at 03:27
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