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Old 2020-02-11, 06:43   #1
AlbenWeeks
 
Feb 2020

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Default Function that reveals primes... NOT

I've probably only found something that already existed, but am posting here to find out.

Let ((2^n)-2)/n = x

for any positive integer n, if x is a whole number, n is prime. if x is not a whole number, n is not prime.

Is this something basic that's been found before? If so can someone let me know what this is called or why it works if there's a basic reason I'm missing?
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Old 2020-02-11, 08:59   #2
Nick
 
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Dec 2012
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It's Fermat's little theorem.
x can be whole without n being prime however - for example, try n=341.
Then look up Carmichael numbers.
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Old 2020-02-12, 06:23   #3
CRGreathouse
 
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What a fantastic re-discovery! As Nick said, this is Fermat's "little" theorem in base 2, a wonderful result that is very commonly used. Its counterexamples are the base-2 pseudoprimes. You've found a new world to explore.
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