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Old 2018-12-29, 17:08   #12
jvang
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nomead View Post
...on 64-bit Gentoo, not Raspbian...
I thought that Raspbian was the only OS that ran well on Pis, but they can run anything from Ubuntu to Windows 10 (there's a version for IoT devices that's available on the Pi website). Good to know!

And of course, a search for "raspberry pi fans" brings up thousands of products They've even got fans built into Pi cases, which is pretty neat.
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Old 2018-12-29, 17:12   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvang View Post
I thought that Raspbian was the only OS that ran well on Pis, but they can run anything from Ubuntu to Windows 10 (there's a version for IoT devices that's available on the Pi website). Good to know!

And of course, a search for "raspberry pi fans" brings up thousands of products They've even got fans built into Pi cases, which is pretty neat.
I am too big a fan of Raspberry PI to stay into a PI case...
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Old 2018-12-30, 22:05   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ET_ View Post
I am too big a fan of Raspberry PI to stay into a PI case...
You could fit quite a bit into a case for this: http://www.seemoreproject.com/

In addition to the IoT core version of Windows 10 (I'm not sure what that means in the first place...), it seems that people are trying to get the full version of Windows 10 working on a Pi. Other than the hardware not really meeting even minimum requirements for the OS, what else is making it hard to run Windows on a Pi? I see a lot of discussions about driver problems and the CPU not running properly, does that mean that the hardware is not readily compatible with Windows?
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Old 2018-12-30, 23:18   #15
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Windows 10 "proper" cannot run on a pi because it is fundamentally for the x86_64 architecture and a pi is not that. The IoT and S versions of windows 10 are cut down rewrites for Arm (and probably with an eye on other architectures) with limited backwards compatibility, it seems there is a push to make windows more portable but it will never be great. Some things can be dealt with by compatibility layers but that's not going to cut it for anything in any way demanding unless you have the hardware grunt to back it up, which the pi doesn't.

A better question is why someone of sane mind would ever willingly put the spyware that is windows on their pi? You don't know joy until you've realised how nice it is to have the same core tools available regardless of the device you're on. Desktops/laptops, headless servers, SBC's, even android phones to an extent, you ssh from one device into any other device and you know what you're doing because the core tools are the same. Windows doesn't have that ecosystem outside of x86 to any real degree and I'm playing the worlds smallest violin for their loss. Not that I'm trying to sell you on FOSS but we have cookies over here ;)
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Old 2018-12-31, 20:10   #16
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I set up the Pi this afternoon. It was pretty straightforward; plug everything in and run the NOOBS software, and it just works!

NOOBS takes maybe 10 minutes to format everything and set up Raspbian, then it reboots right into the desktop. The mouse and keyboard I'm using are wireless, connecting to little USB dongles. Haven't had any connectivity issues so far!

The accompanying case for the Pi is very slick. There are 3 panels, and the Pi is sandwiched very securely in the bottom 2. The top panel is a cover, which is easily removable to show the middle panel that has cutouts for all the I/O ports of the Pi. It's also conveniently labeled. The PCB is pretty high quality, and there are LEDs to show that it has power. There are 2 heatsinks that go on the CPU and the wireless/Bluetooth/Ethernet chip, and the sticky thermal tape holds them in place securely (of course, there are cutouts in the case to accommodate the heatsinks!).

Performance-wise, it's not very sluggish in loading things in the desktop environment. It boots in 20-30 seconds, not far behind the NVMe boot drive in my laptop (10 seconds to boot) given that it's booting off of a 32 GB Micro SD card. The heatsinks get a bit warm during use. I'll look into some neat fans that'll fit in the case
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Old 2019-01-01, 22:23   #17
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My dad and I were going to watch some videos on our TV, but the PS4 is the only device hooked up to the TV. And apparently the PS4 can't read an MP4 file... so my Raspberry Pi is hooked up to the TV now! It runs high-quality video at 1080p easily; we thought something was wrong with the display drivers/software while testing the Pi, but it turns out that the video was just garbage quality/framerate

The Pi kit had an HDMI cable included in the whole package, so all I needed to set up the whole thing was an Ethernet cable (it does have a wireless chip, but wired is more reliable/less complicated). The network light shines bright and clear through the case (cutouts for everything!), which is convenient. There are only 3 cords attached to the Pi (HDMI to TV, Ethernet cable, and power), since I kept the wireless mouse/keyboard setup. So it's very tidy and I can control the Pi from the couch
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Old 2019-01-02, 17:37   #18
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I forgot to use apt-get to update the Pi, so I had to sit through 700 MB of updates!

I've been reading about port forwarding in preparation for setting up the Pi for remote access from outside our LAN. If you were going to do something simple, like set up a gaming server for others to connect to, there are so many tutorials that it would be trivial (I think I did it 5-6 years ago for a Minecraft server ). Understanding what's going on seems a bit more tricky, but this Stack Exchange question/answer/thread-whatever is pretty helpful (and much better than the Wikipedia article!). The top answer in there links to portforward.com, which has a ton of documentation/tutorials for many routers and use cases.

The basic idea I'm getting is that I just need to configure my router to send certain requests to a specific local IP address. All packets going to the public IP address of the LAN go through the router; then the router can forward certain packets to different locations depending on whatever settings are enabled/recorded. Incoming packets with a port number that matches whatever setting you have enabled will be sent to the corresponding device. For most modern games, port forwarding is automatically taken care of with UPnP software, but you still need to set it up manually for remote connections to computers in the LAN or similar cases. It seems to get complicated if you were to do something like try to host 2 web servers on your LAN, since each port can only be used by 1 device at a time. Since port 80 is dedicated to HTTP requests or something, you have to work around this somehow.

Last fiddled with by jvang on 2019-01-02 at 18:01 Reason: typing is hard, "HTTP" not "HTML"
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Old 2019-01-02, 18:19   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvang View Post
The basic idea I'm getting is that I just need to configure my router to send certain requests to a specific local IP address. All packets going to the public IP address of the LAN go through the router; then the router can forward certain packets to different locations depending on whatever settings are enabled/recorded.
As usual, the deep details are a little more complicated...

The packets aren't just "forwarded" to a "local IP address" by your router. There's also something known as Network Address Translation (NAT) going on, since your "local IP" will almost always be in a "private" (AKA (and mis-named) "unrouteable") subnet. 192.168.0.0/16, 172.16.0.0/12 or 10.0.0.0/8.

Drill down on Linux's "iptables" sub-system. It can do some ***amazing*** things!!!
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Old 2019-01-03, 08:40   #20
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If your ISP supports IPv6, then that gives the cleanest solution.
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Old 2019-01-03, 19:07   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chalsall View Post
The packets aren't just "forwarded" to a "local IP address" by your router. There's also something known as Network Address Translation (NAT) going on, since your "local IP" will almost always be in a "private" (AKA (and mis-named) "unrouteable") subnet. 192.168.0.0/16, 172.16.0.0/12 or 10.0.0.0/8.
I'm having trouble understanding how NAT works. Some analogies I found might be helpful:

Analogy #1: Calling the number of an organization/corporation. If I want to call Bob at his office in a big building, dialing the number of his organization or whatever won't get me in contact with him. I have to include his extension, which helps route me to him. If Bob has asked the receptionist to forward all "Bob calls" to his phone, then I may be able to get in touch with him without his exact extension.

Analogy #2: Sending mail to a building with a bunch of people living/working in it. If I want to send a postcard to Bob at his apartment, I can't just send it to the address of the complex. I have to include his PO Box number to get it directly to him. Although, perhaps Bob has an arrangement with whoever puts mail in the boxes to put all mail with his name on it in his box, even if there is no PO Box number on it.

I have no clue how accurate these analogies are, and if the last part of each one is applicable in any way. I'm especially having trouble with how the returning packets get back to their sender. When a computer on the LAN sends a packet outside of the network, the router replaces the source IP address with its own, so as to avoid conflicts between public and private IPs. So when it receives a response meant for the original computer, how does the router determine those packets' recipient?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick View Post
If your ISP supports IPv6, then that gives the cleanest solution.
How can I tell if it does or doesn't? Personally, I haven't been able to tell if anything has gone wrong since we ran out of IPv4 addresses
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Old 2019-01-03, 19:32   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvang View Post
I'm especially having trouble with how the returning packets get back to their sender. When a computer on the LAN sends a packet outside of the network, the router replaces the source IP address with its own, so as to avoid conflicts between public and private IPs. So when it receives a response meant for the original computer, how does the router determine those packets' recipient?
The router keeps a list of ongoing outgoing "sessions" in a table stored in RAM, so when the remote machine returns responses it knows to whom to forward them to. In the case of an incoming connection, the NAT is (usually) decided by way of what port is being requested (although other rules can be established, such as the remote IP or sub-net).

Please see this article for more details. And again, I highly recommend drilling down on "iptables".
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