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Old 2005-08-26, 18:43   #23
Wacky
 
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Beyond High School, we have "College" This is a nominal 4 year program. Again, the students are classified as "Freshman", "Sophomore", "Junior", and "Senior". Entrance into College is somewhat more difficult. The better institutions are selective. But there are always "Community Colleges" that will teach introductory courses and many "Trade School" subjects to those who do not enter a University. Some of these offer only 2 year certificates. THere are still a few "Colleges" that offer only 4 year "Bachelor's" degrees. However most of the institutions now try to be a "University" that includes a program for "Post-Graduate" Education. Generally, this education is in the form of a "Master's" and a "Doctorate" level. Masters programs usually require one to two years beyond the Bachelor's Degree. They usually require that a Thesis be written and approved. The Doctorate requires a Dissertation and a defense of the research behind it.

Although it was less common when I was in school, the better students can now take courses for College credit while still in High School. On the other end of the spectrum, Community Colleges teach remedial courses that are now considered prerequisite for many Universities.

I hope that this explanation helps you understand some of our "No Child Left Behind" (and, IMHO, no child gets ahead) educational system.
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Old 2005-08-26, 23:33   #24
jinydu
 
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So as not to give the wrong impression, I took the IB in Hong Kong. The IB is not part of the official American curriculum.
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Old 2005-08-27, 01:04   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R.D. Silverman
May I ask where you attended high school? Your failure to recognize
these symbols indicates that your high school teachers were grossly
negligent or incompetent. How can they not teach their students
the symbol for "element of" or "summation"?
The simplest explanation of this is the fact that I suffered from unrecognized depression and spent most of my junior and senior year involuntarily committed to various mental health wards, my last major commitment(the one where I finally admitted I was mentally ill) lasted 9 months. Happily after the 9-month internment I have spent less than a total of 3 months of the last 13 years in those types of facilities.

Last fiddled with by jasong on 2005-08-27 at 01:05
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Old 2005-08-28, 15:36   #26
mfgoode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasong
The simplest explanation of this is the fact that I suffered from unrecognized depression and spent most of my junior and senior year involuntarily committed to various mental health wards, my last major commitment(the one where I finally admitted I was mentally ill) lasted 9 months. Happily after the 9-month internment I have spent less than a total of 3 months of the last 13 years in those types of facilities.
I reatly appreciate your utmost candour in openly talking about you disturbed state of mind.

Now that you have admitted it, thats half the battle won to recover completely.
But dont be disheartened as you have chosen the right field in delving with numbers.

Besides maths, I work with a leading psychiatrist and counsel the mentally ill patients voluntarily.
I found that 99% of them are good in maths.
A stunning example is the math'cian John Nash who suffered all his life from schizophrenia but eventually went onto winning the Nobel Prize.
If you read his biography or see the film on his life called 'A Beautiful Mind' it will uplift you.
BTW the book by Tom Apostol on number theory that you are following is far too advanced for you and tryng to go thru it will only depress you further!
There are many elementary books on the subject. I strongly recommend
'Number theory and its history' by O.Ore. It starts from scratch and leads you to more advanced topics Best of luck
Mally
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Old 2005-08-28, 15:47   #27
mfgoode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wacky
I hope that this explanation helps you understand some of our "No Child Left Behind" (and, IMHO, no child gets ahead) educational system.

Thank you for your detailed explanation Wacky.
Would the terms freshman,sophomore, junior and senior cover the feminine gender?
Mally.
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Old 2005-08-28, 16:05   #28
wblipp
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfgoode
:co
Would the terms freshman,sophomore, junior and senior cover the feminine gender?
Paul will kick in soon and tell us that you mean the feminine sex because students are people, not nouns. The terms would apply, but those strongly in the throes of political correctness are likely to substitute "frosh" for "freshmen" and restructure their sentences to avoid the singular "freshman."
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Old 2005-08-28, 16:13   #29
mfgoode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wblipp
Paul will kick in soon and tell us that you mean the feminine sex because students are people, not nouns. The terms would apply, but those strongly in the throes of political correctness are likely to substitute "frosh" for "freshmen" and restructure their sentences to avoid the singular "freshman."
Thank you wblipp for the correction before Paul kicks in with his English language!
Mally
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Old 2005-08-28, 16:19   #30
mfgoode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jinydu
So as not to give the wrong impression, I took the IB in Hong Kong. The IB is not part of the official American curriculum.
So what exactly is the IB ? Is it equivalent to the Senior Cambridge at O levels or A levels? or at a higher level?
Mally
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Old 2005-08-28, 20:29   #31
xilman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wblipp
Paul will kick in soon and tell us that you mean the feminine sex because students are people, not nouns. The terms would apply, but those strongly in the throes of political correctness are likely to substitute "frosh" for "freshmen" and restructure their sentences to avoid the singular "freshman."
Oh no I won't!.

The phrase "feminine gender" is correct per se, but wrongly applied in the present case. What was meant was "female sex".


Paul
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Old 2005-09-14, 15:30   #32
Peter Nelson
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mfgoode
So what exactly is the IB ? Is it equivalent to the Senior Cambridge at O levels or A levels? or at a higher level?
Mally
IB = International Baccalaureate

It's a single qualification, which is similar to A levels (in multiple subjects).
It is suitable for university admission to an undergraduate course.

IB is not common in the UK however.

Contrasting with USA 4 year undergraduate courses, in the UK, most Bachelors (Honours) courses can be completed in 3 years although this is still 4 in Scotland. We generally call first year undergraduates informally as "freshers" thus avoiding any "sex/gender" issues.

Like Paul I was introduced to the "c" (element/member of a set) and sigma (sum) notation during UK secondary school (in my case in the early 1980s). This would have been covered in GCE O level exams at 16 and we probably learnt this material in the equivalent of "Junior High" age classes. Having said that, I was in "top stream" so less able students may have been learning 2+2=4 at that time, and may have sat the less demanding "CSE" exams. Later the exams were merged to form our current exam system of GCSE at 16 but we still retain the 16-18 "Advanced" (A) level system. It was not until "A" level that we covered "imaginary" numbers and their manipulation.

I understand that interrupted attendance for medical reasons may have left gaps in your mathematical foundations. You might find some of the maths discussed here a little over your head unless you read or do some course to help. I found having school revision aid books a useful text because they condense so much material onto a page. It's a useful cribsheet place to look things up (when you want to use stuff after exams).

I have to admit that neither my school or some undergraduate maths covered in any real detail topics of the subject of Number Theory, so many of us are still learners here.
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Old 2005-09-16, 03:25   #33
jinydu
 
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The IB Diploma is an academic qualification that prepares you for university. As Peter Nelson said, the 'I' stands for International; the IB is available in many countries around the world and it often focuses on international issues.

To get the IB Diploma, you have to take 6 courses simultaneously, over a period of 2 years: 3 at "Higher Level" and 3 at "Standard Level". On top of that, you need to write an Extended Essay (maximum of 4000 words) and a shorter essay (1000-1500 words, but with a far shorter deadline and a much harder topic), perform a group presentation, take various 6-week "Theory of Knowledge" modules and complete 150 hours of "Creativity, Action and Service" (50 hours each). At least in my high school, the IB had a reputation for being much tougher than A Levels. Of course, I found some parts much harder than others.

The official website is www.ibo.org (you'll have to search for "IB Diploma". There are other, earlier, stages in the IB curriculum).

Last fiddled with by jinydu on 2005-09-16 at 03:26
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