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Old 2019-02-03, 23:17   #11
kriesel
 
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Mar 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M344587487 View Post
I know it's a lot of aspirin, that was the joke.
I had just read shortly before that, an account of a college student who sometimes left food out after cooking multimeal batches, instead of refrigerating it. Well, he got food poisoning, this time a bad one, after pasta sat at room temp for 2 days, ate it even though it tasted funny, tried to self treat with lots of pepto bismol and sleep, no liver transplant was available after his was destroyed with the infection and subsequent mass intake of bismuth subsalicylate, and he died, in a couple more days, very unpleasantly. There was a video prepared by the hospital detailing the case post mortem. Same article stated Reye syndrome is aspirin toxicity in children. Discontinuing use of aspirin in children has reduced Reye syndrome occurrence by 90% https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reye_syndrome Mammals don't live long without a functioning liver.

Sometimes people choose to let freshly made food cool to near ambient before refrigerating. This is risky, especially if left too long. In the case of the dead college student, his roommate "helped" him by refrigerating it, after finding it out, not knowing it had sat for 2 days already. I've adopted the habit of leaving a fluorescent task light on in the kitchen until all newly prepared food is consumed or stowed. The light serves as a reminder there's more to take care of in the next hour.

There are some things students should be well aware of, as risks to themselves or peers. Food poisoning, ethanol and drug od, poor decision making while intoxicated, and encephalitis claim too many young people. UW-LaCrosse was losing intoxicated students regularly to the Mississippi River in close proximity to many bars there; stumble on the river walk, drown, and may be days before the body is found downriver. There are diseases that are paradoxically more deadly to young adults and are often mistaken for minor things until it's too late to treat or save.

Last fiddled with by kriesel on 2019-02-03 at 23:25
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