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Old 2008-09-27, 12:54   #3
Mini-Geek
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"Tim Sorbera"
Aug 2006
San Antonio, TX USA

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Why are some of the cells in your spreadsheet colored different?
Under Rule 4:

What about M23 (2^11213-1)?
With M23 as Mz, b-a=1221, while d +/- c +/- 2*e = 5163, 5195, 5337, or 5369
There's no equality, so I guess M11213 isn't in the range to be a candidate for M23, huh?

Or M22 (2^9941-1)?
With M22 as Mz, b-a=244, while d +/- c +/- 2*e = -172, 176, 164, or 512
There's no equality, so I guess M9941 isn't in the range to be a candidate for M22, huh?


Under Rule 3:

With M23 as Mz, a +/- b = 1221 or 1323, while c +/- d = 5258 or 5274
There's no equality, so I guess M11213 isn't in the range to be a candidate for M23, huh?


If your method doesn't stand up to the earlier Mersenne primes, why would it be correct for the current ones? By the way, how exactly your method is calculated is pretty complicated, but it seems it would be effected by the following observation:

The recent primes (since M40 at p=~20M) are far closer together than heuristics projected.

If your method suggests the next primes based on how close together the recent ones have been (indirectly, I'm sure, as you'd want to check it with recent primes to see if it fits, but not necessarily go through the time to check that all 44 fit it), it will be very far off for the older primes.
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