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Old 2022-06-19, 16:45   #23
kruoli
 
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"Oliver"
Sep 2017
Porta Westfalica, DE

24·7·11 Posts
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On startup, it will set the affinities of all processes that are named as the process name that was specified. After that, it will subscribe to a system call that informs about newly spawned processes.

So you have omitted .exe in the command line as I have done? You could try to call AffinitySetter notepad and look if something happens if you open Notepad. It might be that Windows 11 blocks the behaviour of my program, I cannot test that. (I am assuming you might use Windows 11 because you were speaking about performance cores.)
  1. In your example, -H (hyperthreading enabled) would equal to -i 2 on Windows and not specifying -H would equal to -i 1. Yes, this seems more user friendly, but I will keep -i when adding such a switch.
  2. This could be done on startup, which is the only point where this could apply.
  3. This is already the default and should be shown if it works correctly. Real world example from one of the machines where I am running it:
    Code:
    Execute on PID 18340. Set affinity to core 15.
    Core 9 freed.
    Execute on PID 6744. Set affinity to core 9.
    Core 13 freed.
    Execute on PID 17332. Set affinity to core 13.
    Core 1 freed.
    Execute on PID 10520. Set affinity to core 1.
    Core 9 freed.
    Execute on PID 17088. Set affinity to core 9.
    Core 11 freed.
    Execute on PID 17208. Set affinity to core 11.
    Core 13 freed.
    Execute on PID 10792. Set affinity to core 13.
    Core 1 freed.
    Execute on PID 17516. Set affinity to core 1.
    Core 5 freed.
    Core 11 freed.
    Execute on PID 18824. Set affinity to core 5.
    Execute on PID 19148. Set affinity to core 11.
  4. This does not apply to the event watcher I use, unfortunately.

Yes, already set PIDs are watched and the used cores are marked as "used" in the program.
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