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Old 2017-05-11, 05:48   #243
gd_barnes
 
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May 2007
Kansas; USA

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweety439 View Post
This divisor is always gcd(k+-1,b-1) (+ for Sierpinski, - for Riesel), e.g. for R7, k=197, the divisor is gcd(197-1,7-1) = 2, and for S10, k=269, the divisor is gcd(269+1,10-1) = 9. Besides, for SR3, the divisor of all even k is 1 and the divisor of all odd k is 2.

Thus, for example, for R13, the divisor of k=1, 2, 3, ... are {12, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 6, 1, 4, 3, 2, 1, 12, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, ...}, and for S11, the divisor of k=1, 2, 3, ... are {2, 1, 2, 5, 2, 1, 2, 1, 10, 1, 2, 1, 2, 5, 2, 1, 2, 1, ...}.
OK I understand it now. But wow...these forms are a pain-in-the-arse to search and sieve. Each base has a rotating set of divisors for its k's. So it would have to have multiple and separate sieves done...whereas CRUS and the repeating digit effort that I did a lot of searching on here could be sieved and tested one time for each base/digit combo.

With this much personal effort required to search a single base I doubt that you will have too many interested people. But...it's all in the presentation. You have to create that web page and demonstrate that you can run the correct programs before asking others to do the same. If you do that you may get some more interested people.

Last fiddled with by gd_barnes on 2017-05-11 at 05:49
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