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Batalov 2020-12-22 23:27

COVID vaccination wavefront
 
If/when you will [B]actually [/B]receive first dose of a COVID vaccine, would you please add the month to the stats?

(this poll is anonymous)

P.S. Btw I noticed that very few folks in my environment used this feature that accompanies the process of vaccination: [URL="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/vsafe.html"]V-Safe[/URL] program (this is U.S., but there are probably similar programs in other countries)

[COLOR="Blue"]P.P.S. I had mine on that date 12/22 and 2nd shot on 1/15 (Moderna)[/COLOR]

ONeil 2020-12-23 01:19

[QUOTE=Batalov;567032]If/when you receive first dose of a COVID vaccine, please add to the stats?

(this poll is anonymous)

P.S. Btw I noticed that very few folks in my environment used this feature that accompanies the process of vaccination: [URL="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/vsafe.html"]V-Safe[/URL] program (this is U.S., but there are probably similar programs in other countries)[/QUOTE]


I DO NOT WISH TO BE A COVID RECEPTACLE WITH THE SAME mRNA & COVID PROTIENS. Its my body my life!

Xyzzy 2020-12-23 01:31

Your poll needs an "ASAP" option!

:mike:

Uncwilly 2020-12-23 01:43

[QUOTE=Xyzzy;567058]Your poll needs an "ASAP" option![/QUOTE]The poll is for documentation of the experience, not our desire,

Batalov 2020-12-23 01:52

Right! I wanted this to look interesting in 4-5 months time as a histogram.
The poll will remain open for 8 months.

Granted, we only have a tiny slice of the population here, but still...

Dr Sardonicus 2020-12-23 02:23

[QUOTE=Batalov;567032]If/when you receive first dose of a COVID vaccine, please add to the stats?

(this poll is anonymous)

P.S. Btw I noticed that very few folks in my environment used this feature that accompanies the process of vaccination: [URL="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/vsafe.html"]V-Safe[/URL] program (this is U.S., but there are probably similar programs in other countries)[/QUOTE]
Good to know for future reference. Hmm, the V-safe program is specifically for the COVID vaccine.

I don't anticipate being able to get the shot for a couple of months or so. There is a limited supply as of yet, and other people who IMO deserve to be ahead of me in line. And others who, due to high political office, get to cut in line - even if they've been downplaying or denying the seriousness of the pandemic, or denouncing measures to prevent its spread as a violation of "rights."

I got my flu shot 3 months ago, and just got a pneumonia shot. According to the paperwork, there is[list]information at [url]www.cdc.gov/vaccines[/url][*]a [b]V[/b]accine [b]A[/b]dverse [b]E[/b]vent [b]R[/b]eporting [b]S[/b]ystem at [url]www.vaers.hhs.gov[/url][*]the National [b]V[/b]accine [b]I[/b]njury [b]C[/b]ompensation [b]P[/b]rogram at [url]www.hrsa,gov/vaccinecompensation[/url][/list]

mathwiz 2020-12-23 04:37

[QUOTE=ONeil;567056]I DO NOT WISH TO BE A COVID RECEPTACLE WITH THE SAME mRNA & COVID PROTIENS. Its my body my life![/QUOTE]

If you don't want to be a "covid receptacle" then get the damn vaccine. Or are you still under the impression that Bill Gates and his maniacal cult at the Deep State are using it to turn you into a robot?

LaurV 2020-12-23 05:02

I have no objection to this vaccine, but I won't go by myself to get one (laziness, busy schedule, hospitalo-phobia, hihi, I can count on the fingers of one hand how many times I went to a hospital for myself in my life), unless I will be cornered/pushed by the medical half of the family, or it will became mandatory, which is the most probable scenario - I mean, I used to travel for work, and if "those nice times" ever come back, vaccination my be required by either some airline or some destination place, or both. In that case, and assuming it will be available in Thai, then yes, I will go to have a shot and post here.

VBCurtis 2020-12-23 05:27

[QUOTE=mathwiz;567071]If you don't want to be a "covid receptacle" then get the damn vaccine. Or are you still under the impression that Bill Gates and his maniacal cult at the Deep State are using it to turn you into a robot?[/QUOTE]

The Deep State already took his wits, dadgummit they won't get his free will!

retina 2020-12-23 05:37

There is already a vote for May 2021. So already at least one person that doesn't care about data integrity.

Batalov 2020-12-23 07:19

Data is data. Raw data that is, you give folks all the freedom they want to have.

[SPOILER]When I first data mined our local genetic database (we have by now sequenced >> 1,000 diagnostic clinical cases; and yes, we are a CAP/CLiA certified genetic lab for the test specifications for which we developed, wrote and validated ourselves*), I've found 3 female fathers and 4 male mothers. Most of them of course were clerical errors. We've identified false paternities, incest... but no false maternities so far. We've found some newborns whose gender parents already pre-decided ("Our child is a boy," genetic sex be damned.) The tagging practices in 21st century are not what they were in, say, 1970s, when toe tags could be swapped (the leading root cause for false maternities).

We as DNA scientists see people deeper than 'naked', we take a test of the nuclei of their cells. Gender is a term reserved for self-determination (and it can be non-binary), but genetically many simplest invariants that we immediately compute from the genomic DNA sequence is the _sex_. The scientific articles a chock full of _sex_, you better believe it.
___
* but there is not much room there to be arbitrary. FDA, CAP, CLiA, AMP lay out guidelines and best practices, and our degrees of freedom lie in implementing those correctly.[/SPOILER]

pinhodecarlos 2020-12-23 08:20

[QUOTE=mathwiz;567071]If you don't want to be a "covid receptacle" then get the damn vaccine. Or are you still under the impression that Bill Gates and his maniacal cult at the Deep State are using it to turn you into a robot?[/QUOTE]

Isn’t that better for ONeil?

paulunderwood 2020-12-23 08:39

Despite the big fanfare photo-opertunity media frenzy at the time of the first jab, only 500,000 people n the UK have had a first jab. This has taken weeks. Only 100 times as many more of the population to go. The tory majority goverrnment cannot organise without a host of friendly private companies a p:censored:s up in a brewery.

pinhodecarlos 2020-12-23 08:45

[QUOTE=paulunderwood;567092]Despite the big fanfare photo-opertunity media frenzy at the time of the first jab, only 500,000 people n the UK have had a first jab. This has taken weeks. Only 100 times as many more of the population to go. The tory majority goverrnment cannot organise without a host of friendly private companies a p:censored:s up in a brewery.[/QUOTE]

I don’t even know if that number is correct since it was announced by BJ.

Brownfox 2020-12-23 10:21

My father is in one of the top categories. He hasn't been contacted at all yet. Keeping fingers crossed he doesn't get Covid.

firejuggler 2020-12-23 17:02

France has decided to vaccinate eldery first, then medical personnel working with them. As a young (almost 40) and not at-risk person, the vaccine will be availlable to the general population in spring.

The Carnivore 2020-12-23 17:06

A friend who's working in local government in the U.S. got this memo earlier in the week:

"Public employees, especially essential workers on the front lines of exposure, will receive higher priority than the general public and vaccinations of City of XXX employees will begin as soon as December 28. However, employees on lower tiers may not be vaccinated for several months."

On another note, I know some retirees who're age 70+ and haven't been to a doctor in decades since they're feeling perfectly fine. But their age still puts them in a higher risk group, so how will they know when it's their turn to get the vaccine? Do they just call the local drugstore every week and ask whether they can get the shot that day?

xilman 2020-12-23 17:25

[QUOTE=The Carnivore;567135]On another note, I know some retirees who're age 70+ and haven't been to a doctor in decades since they're feeling perfectly fine. But their age still puts them in a higher risk group, so how will they know when it's their turn to get the vaccine? Do they just call the local drugstore every week and ask whether they can get the shot that day?[/QUOTE]It depends where you live.

Around here such people are contacted.

M344587487 2020-12-23 18:24

[QUOTE=paulunderwood;567092]Despite the big fanfare photo-opertunity media frenzy at the time of the first jab, only 500,000 people n the UK have had a first jab. This has taken weeks. Only 100 times as many more of the population to go. The tory majority goverrnment cannot organise without a host of friendly private companies a p:censored:s up in a brewery.[/QUOTE]
Sounds pretty quick to me but I have low expectations.

lavalamp 2020-12-28 00:23

There was a [URL="https://www.omnicalculator.com/health/vaccine-queue-uk"]website I visited recently[/URL] that let you get an estimate of where you stand in line for the vaccine (in the UK), after asking your age and some basic medical questions. It said I should expect it to be sometime in July - September as I am in the lowest priority group.

I will take it when it becomes available to me, but to me this suggests it will be a minimum 6 more months until things start to return to normal.

I very much do not want to catch COVID-19 as it appears there can be long lasting health effects as well as cognitive deficits. :no:

ATH 2020-12-28 07:05

The first vaccines in Denmark were given yesterday Dec 27th to old people in nursing homes.
We only got like 9,700 vaccines so far, and will get 30K-50K more every week.

storm5510 2020-12-28 16:59

[QUOTE=ATH;567521]The first vaccines in Denmark were given yesterday Dec 27th to old people in nursing homes.
We only got like 9,700 vaccines so far, and will get 30K-50K more every week.[/QUOTE]

I read yesterday that hospitals and nursing homes will be first in line here in the U.S. This is patients and staff. I would guess that all emergency service workers would be next. Police, fire, and ambulance crews, anyone with a high contact rate with other people.

firejuggler 2020-12-28 17:28

polititians?

storm5510 2020-12-28 18:02

[QUOTE=firejuggler;567549]polititians?[/QUOTE]

The above is a "typo" it appears. Politicians, I believe, was the intended word. :smile:

CRGreathouse 2020-12-28 20:33

[QUOTE=storm5510;567544]I read yesterday that hospitals and nursing homes will be first in line here in the U.S. This is patients and staff. I would guess that all emergency service workers would be next. Police, fire, and ambulance crews, anyone with a high contact rate with other people.[/QUOTE]

First: Health care personnel with potential exposure to COVID patients and LTCF residents (nursing home patients)
Second: Frontline essential workers (First responders [firefighters, police], education [teachers, support staff, daycare], Food and agriculture, Manufacturing, Corrections workers, U.S. Postal Service workers, Public transit workers, Grocery store workers), people 75 and older
Third: People ages 65-74, people ages 16-64 with high-risk conditions, and other essential workers
Fourth: Everyone else

The third wave is the largest -- lots of people have at least one high-risk condition.

S485122 2020-12-28 21:05

[QUOTE=CRGreathouse;567560]...
Second: ...
Corrections workers,
...[/QUOTE]To be logical you should include all the incarcerated people, more generally people who can't keep the security distancing measures.

Jacob

CRGreathouse 2020-12-29 02:27

[QUOTE=S485122;567561]To be logical you should include all the incarcerated people, more generally people who can't keep the security distancing measures.[/QUOTE]

Another group that would warrant more protection under most epidemiological models is the homeless. Probably the homeless put the community at even higher risk (as they mingle with the community more, especially once you remove corrections officers) and so are even more deserving of vaccine priority.

a1call 2020-12-29 03:08

IMHO it is inexcusable that there should be any prioritizing at all. It only indicates that there is not enough resources allocated to vaccine production/distribution. By vaccinating and exponentially increasing vaccination production personnel you could vaccinate the whole planet virtually (as opposed to literally) overnight. In times of war all factories and available personnel are converted/retooled and utilized to make bombs and tanks. If they would only use the same logic against Covid-19.
I heard in the news yesterday that Israel has already vaccinated 1% of its population and will finish vaccinating the whole country by April.

retina 2020-12-29 04:07

[QUOTE=a1call;567594]IMHO it is inexcusable that there should be any prioritizing at all.[/QUOTE]Welcome to a1call's fantasy world where there is only ever one thing to consider and all other things are void.

Uncwilly 2020-12-29 04:27

[QUOTE=a1call;567594]IMHO it is inexcusable that there should be any prioritizing at all. It only indicates that there is not enough resources allocated to vaccine production/distribution. By vaccinating and exponentially increasing vaccination production personnel you could vaccinate the whole planet virtually (as opposed to literally) overnight. In times of war all factories and available personnel are converted/retooled and utilized to make bombs and tanks. If they would only use the same logic against Covid-19.
I heard in the news yesterday that Israel has already vaccinated 1% of its population and will finish vaccinating the whole country by April.[/QUOTE]
To say that all factories should be turned into vaccine production is a vast misunderstanding of the process of making the vaccine. It has to be kept 'super cold' or just very cold. What types of factories have that capability? The process of making the vaccine is not like machining parts. Making pistons for tanks is very much like making pistons for cars. Making vaccines is not like making say, fire retardant chemicals or even brewing beer or even some other vital medication. The companies can't stop making other needed medication to make the vaccine instead (sorry grandpa, no more heart medication until we vaccinate everyone).

The companies that have been making the vaccine have been doing things in parallel. In addition to the trials, they have been producing vaccine presuming that the there would be approval. The time from start on the vaccine to development for first human trials to stage 3 trials to EUA has been so quick. Go back and look at the timeline for any prior vaccine or just about any medication. The development and production are unparalleled in speed.

Israel is getting a huge portion of their vaccines from Pfizer (while working on their own version.) So, that is pulling from the same pool as the USA, Canada, and many other countries. Who (country) gets doses when also depends on which country got their order in for how many and when. Some countries have over subscribed for vaccines (they have contracted for more doses than needed to fully inoculate their entire population. Some by 25% extra, some over 100% extra. So, those doses won't be available to other countries until they release them.

As far as the unhoused or poorly housed population getting priority. Over the summer I worked with that population on multiple occasions.. I have some prior experience dealing with them. They are at high risk. I would rather have them vaccinated ahead of me, if it was my choice. They are a very 'at risk' population. Many are homeless due to medical bills or mental health issues. Those that have medical issues often are seeing good management of their issues. Poorly housed also includes people that are in housing that is too small for the size of the housing unit. Having 4 people out working at low paying jobs increases the risk to the people in that housing unit. And unlike me, their sick time benefits are minimal. That puts them at risk.

If it takes 3 years to get 95% of the world (or 95% of those that are willing/able to take the vaccine) vaccinated, that will be a major triumph. If it occurs in 24 months (counting this month), that will be a near miraculous achievement.

Dr Sardonicus 2020-12-29 13:27

[QUOTE=a1call;567594]IMHO it is inexcusable that there should be any prioritizing at all.
<snip>
By vaccinating and exponentially increasing vaccination production personnel you could vaccinate the whole planet virtually (as opposed to literally) overnight.[/QUOTE]
So, on the one hand, it is "inexcusable" to prioritize who gets the vaccine based on limited availability, while on the other hand, you advocate an impossible level of converting production capacity from other things to producing the vaccine, which is just a different kind of prioritizing. So you are being logically inconsistent regarding the desirability of prioritization.

The impracticability and adverse consequences of trying to increase vaccine production as you indicate have already been described.

Another aspect of vaccine availability has also come up:[QUOTE=Uncwilly;567602]<snip>
Israel is getting a huge portion of their vaccines from Pfizer (while working on their own version.) So, that is pulling from the same pool as the USA, Canada, and many other countries. Who (country) gets doses when also depends on which country got their order in for how many and when.[/QUOTE]To emphasize this excellent point, I offer the following: A December 7 AP story, [url=https://apnews.com/article/feds-pfizer-vaccine-doses-covid-19-88fd7c59fd0af8669ed3cdafdf08881e]Feds passed up chance to lock in more Pfizer vaccine doses[/url][quote]WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration opted last summer not to lock in a chance to buy millions of additional doses of one of the leading coronavirus vaccine contenders, a decision that could delay the delivery of a second batch of doses until manufacturer Pfizer fulfills other international contracts.
<snip>
Under its contract with Pfizer, the Trump administration committed to buy an initial 100 million doses, with an option to purchase as many as five times more.

This summer, the White House opted not to lock in an additional 100 million doses for delivery in the second quarter of 2021, according to people who spoke about the matter on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss it publicly.
<snip>
Days ahead of the vaccine's expected approval, the administration is reversing course, but it is not clear that Pfizer, which has since made commitments to other countries, will be able to meet the latest request on the same timeline.[/quote]In a December 23 story, [url=https://apnews.com/article/health-coronavirus-pandemic-coronavirus-vaccine-f35259fee53146887591c32fd8ca6fdb]Pfizer to supply US with additional 100M doses of vaccine[/url],[quote]Under the Pfizer deal announced Wednesday, the company will deliver at least 70 million of the additional vaccine doses by June 30, with the remaining 30 million to be delivered no later than July 31.[/quote]So it looks to me like the Admin's passing on the additional 100 million doses this past summer has cost the US in vaccine availability for most of the second quarter.

retina 2020-12-29 13:46

Re: prioritising
 
I think it is just a consequence of only following the MSM headlines.

When people only see the "most important" news[sup]*[/sup], then the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Availability_heuristic]availability heuristic[/url] kicks in and suddenly the only thing that matters now is what the MSM are talking about.

To all those that only follow the MSM "news": Congratulations on being successfully brainwashed into thinking exactly how the MSM would like you to think. We'll be back after these important messages with more updates, so stay tuned ...

[size=1][sup]*[/sup] Where "most important" is as defined by the MSM. Which translates to: The "news" that generates the most profit for them.[/size]

storm5510 2020-12-29 16:18

[QUOTE=CRGreathouse;567560]First: Health care personnel with potential exposure to COVID patients and LTCF residents (nursing home patients)
Second: Frontline essential workers (First responders [firefighters, police], education [teachers, support staff, daycare], Food and agriculture, Manufacturing, Corrections workers, U.S. Postal Service workers, Public transit workers, Grocery store workers), people 75 and older
Third: People ages 65-74, people ages 16-64 with high-risk conditions, and other essential workers
Fourth: Everyone else

The third wave is the largest -- lots of people have at least one high-risk condition.[/QUOTE]

I fear the timeline for this will be long. Then, there is the new variant. I wonder if the current vaccine is already obsolete? My next doctor's appointment is in early March. I will have to ask...

Runtime Error 2020-12-29 17:03

[QUOTE=storm5510;567640]I fear the timeline for this will be long. Then, there is the new variant. I wonder if the current vaccine is already obsolete? My next doctor's appointment is in early March. I will have to ask...[/QUOTE]

Obsolete is a strong word. The current vaccine will confer partial immunity against new mutations. How much depends on which mutations occur. Most mutations will not affect the proteins that the current vaccines target. Relatedly, even if you got a flu shot several years ago, it still provides [I]some[/I] protection against this year's flu. (But that is not an excuse to skip this year's flu shot!)

masser 2020-12-29 19:03

[QUOTE=storm5510;567640]I fear the timeline for this will be long. Then, there is the new variant. I wonder if the current vaccine is already obsolete? My next doctor's appointment is in early March. I will have to ask...[/QUOTE]

You might want to check with local pharmacies to see if they can vaccinate you before early March. A relative of mine is 76 and I suspect they will be vaccinated in the next month.

Dr Sardonicus 2020-12-29 19:05

[QUOTE=Runtime Error;567646]<snip>
Relatedly, even if you got a flu shot several years ago, it still provides [I]some[/I] protection against this year's flu. (But that is not an excuse to skip this year's flu shot!)[/QUOTE]The current year's vaccine isn't always a good match to what turns out to be this season's strain, so I've kind of hoped that if I get the flu shot every year, I might have significant antibodies to different strains targeted by recent years' flu shots. That way, if this year's shot isn't a good match, some of the old buckshot still might hit.

Batalov 2020-12-29 19:35

The learned immune system can recognize the fragments of a significantly similar virus. The spike protein fragments of 6-7 aminoacids in length are recognized by immune cells. In new Covid-19 variants, there are only 1 or 2 changes in the spike proteins (S1, S2) length (out of several hundred).
There are experiments ongoing to ascertain that theory, at Walter Reed, at BioNTec and more.

There is a good open-text article: [url]https://www.nature.com/articles/s41392-020-00352-y[/url]
They argue that some folks that had had old SARS may have immune system that would recognize Covid-19 even though those are much more different than the several known new variations of the 2019 Covid-19 strain.

What is relatively good about coronaviruses as a a class: they mutate much slower than e.g. flu. The vaccine next year might be a cocktail of two (or whatever is practical), but this year there is no reason to delay vaccinations with these two good looking vaccines (AZ/Oxford is also nearly there).

pinhodecarlos 2020-12-29 19:47

Maybe still early stages but I was looking for figures regarding patients with Parkinson Disease who already took the vaccine, what was the outcome reaction if any or none.

CRGreathouse 2020-12-29 21:00

[QUOTE=pinhodecarlos;567660]Maybe still early stages but I was looking for figures regarding patients with Parkinson Disease who already took the vaccine, what was the outcome reaction if any or none.[/QUOTE]

I couldn't find anything on LitCovid or the BNT162b2 trial paper (NEJM).

pinhodecarlos 2020-12-30 07:47

Covid-19: Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine approved for use in UK.
[url]https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55280671[/url]

pinhodecarlos 2020-12-30 08:46

On the link below you can follow the covid-19 vaccination administer so far worldwide.

[url]https://ourworldindata.org/covid-vaccinations[/url]

paulunderwood 2020-12-31 18:19

The c:censored:k ups have begun. Despite the tested and recommended dose interval of three weeks by the manufacturer between jabs, the uk tory government playing pseufo-scientists know better and have said that 12 weeks is good.

[url]https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/dec/31/covid-vaccine-uk-doctors-criticise-rescheduling-of-second-doses[/url]

PhilF 2020-12-31 18:43

[QUOTE=paulunderwood;567867]The c:censored:k ups have begun. Despite the tested and recommended dose interval of three weeks by the manufacturer between jabs, the uk tory government playing pseufo-scientists know better and have said that 12 weeks is good.

[url]https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/dec/31/covid-vaccine-uk-doctors-criticise-rescheduling-of-second-doses[/url][/QUOTE]

Hmmm. I thought only Trump was smarter than the scientists.

a1call 2020-12-31 19:52

[QUOTE=pinhodecarlos;567711]On the link below you can follow the covid-19 vaccination administer so far worldwide.

[url]https://ourworldindata.org/covid-vaccinations[/url][/QUOTE]

It is fascinating that Israel has vaccinated (1st dose to be exact) close to 10% of its population already while other countries who generally consider themselves super-powers or otherwise on top of the scientific/military/... Pyramid lag so far behind.

Pride is such a set-backer.

masser 2020-12-31 20:21

[QUOTE=a1call;567873]It is fascinating that Israel has vaccinated (1st dose to be exact) close to 10% of its population already while other countries who generally consider themselves super-powers or otherwise on top of the scientific/military/... Pyramid lag so far behind.

Pride is such a set-backer.[/QUOTE]

What is the population of Israel?

Uncwilly 2020-12-31 20:30

[QUOTE=masser;567876]What is the population of Israel?[/QUOTE]
The same as New Jersey. (Almost exactly.) And the size is about the same too.
It is less than the population of NYC, Tokyo, London, Mexico city, greater Los Angeles, or a few other cities.

a1call 2020-12-31 20:33

In this list there are 233-101=132 countries with populations less than Israel:
[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_population_(United_Nations)[/url]

While a factor it is not the only factor.

Uncwilly 2020-12-31 20:47

[QUOTE=a1call;567880]In this list there are 233-101=132 countries with populations less than Israel:[/QUOTE]The smallest 30[B] total [/B]~1,000,000 in population. Add the next 30 in and you get approx. the population of Israel. Many of those "Countries" are dependent regions or other territories of other countries.

a1call 2020-12-31 21:05

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;567882]The smallest 30[B] total [/B]~1,000,000 in population. Add the next 30 in and you get approx. the population of Israel. Many of those "Countries" are dependent regions or other territories of other countries.[/QUOTE]

We have a staying in Persian:
The cat can't reach the meat so he says it stinks.
Population is certainly a factor In terms of available supplies. But surely they have the same logistics challenges when it come to distribution and adminstration per capita.
As for the limited available supplies again IMHO there is no excuse for it. There are millions of people out of work and non essential businesses in shut down around the world. These are unused resources that can be utilized to save millions of lives which will sure be lost In the next few weeks/months/years if more is not done.
Just my 2 cents.:smile:
ETA To be fair IIRC Israel has or did at some have the highest number of doctors per capita.

LaurV 2021-01-02 14:13

[QUOTE=a1call;567883]We have a staying in Persian:
The cat can't reach the meat so he says it stinks.[/QUOTE]
Here is the fox and the sour grapes.

Uncwilly 2021-01-26 20:06

Even though this is a sticky, I figured a bump was in order, as the vaccines are becoming more widely available.
:bump:

pinhodecarlos 2021-01-26 20:38

Expectation here for my wife’s turn. Forecast is third week of Feb 2021. Vaccination programme is going well despite what people think.

Batalov 2021-01-26 21:00

My daughter got eligible through employer and she got the 1st shot on Friday. (tier 1A, phase 3). Long lines, phew! (2 hrs + )
Ah, forgot - and I am done with the 2nd shot.

My wife might get a slot soon. Currently in San Diego county, the tier is at 65+ and medical tiers 1A. My son is in the farther away tier.

pinhodecarlos 2021-01-26 21:39

Great stuff Batalov. Keep us updated.

Are there any programmes to help to roll out the vaccine to poor countries? I think our PM mentioned something last year but I might be wrong.

masser 2021-01-26 22:46

My wife received her second dose a few weeks ago. I probably won't get my first shot for another few months.

Uncwilly 2021-01-26 23:24

I will be working at a mass inoculation site on Monday. There is a good chance I might get my first dose then.

Batalov 2021-01-26 23:46

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;570184]I will be working at a mass inoculation site on Monday. There is a good chance I might get my first dose then.[/QUOTE]
I heard that there is a zero waste policy in place. Our hospital goes out of their way to find someone (children's parents or wards, ...or once there was an EMT driver) - to inoculate anyone at the end of the day. No shots should go to waste, even if there were no-shows or whatnot.

So, they should, definitely, turn towards any and all workers, first thing.

Re: poor countries. I have heard that in some countries there is a terrible disconnect between gov't and people. From a person in Ukraine, I heard that their government has 1) silly attitude towards the pandemic (trumpian-like) and 2) expects hand-outs from EU ("we (the country as a whole) will wait to be [I]given [/I]the vaccine"). There is a budget even in poor countries! There are in all seriousness very few [I]failed states[/I]. Vaccine is a commodity, so the price surely needs to be negotiated and purchased at state level, budget has to be appropriated, something else should be postponed (maybe some road patching, maybe some military expenses). That's what a good government is for. It is probably a childhood disease of socialism to expect something for free (I mean between states); the pharm companies have to pay their workers at the end of the day. (Even when people talk about very cheap malaria drugs for example - they are not really free; they are nearly free to those who receive them, but who pays for them? Gates foundation and some other charities. People love to hate Gates among other people but it deserves to be known how their foundation helps to pay for the medicines so that those drugs would become free for recipients.)

kriesel 2021-01-27 00:24

This poll may need choices by quarter-year, not by month, to span the possible duration. A case in point: Wisconsin's population is 5.852 million; first-dose vaccines are being supplied to the state currently at 70,000/week. That works out to 1.6 years for everyone in the state; 10 weeks to handle just one of the currently eligible groups. Without adjusting for losses due to accidental or deliberate spoilage. [URL]https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/12/31/covid-vaccines-destroyed-wisconsin-hospital/[/URL]
Hopefully the supply rate will ramp up further and bring herd immunity sooner. It's estimated to take 75-80% vaccinated [URL]https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/2021/01/16/we-made-covid-19-vaccines-fast-why-distribution-behind-schedule/6622178002/[/URL]
[URL]https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-about.htm[/URL]
[URL]https://worldpopulationreview.com/states/wisconsin-population[/URL]

As of today, less than 70,000 Wisconsinites (1.2%) have completed the vaccination series. [URL]https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-data.htm#series[/URL]
As of today's posted statistics, 356,000 Wisconsinites (6.1%) have received at least one dose. No age bracket has yet reached 8% first-dose.
Female recipients outnumber males by more than 2:1.

I'm in a currently eligible group. I've recently received a phone text notification from my health care provider that vaccine supplies are limited and will later receive a notification of when I'll be allowed to schedule a vaccination. With no indication how many months that translates to. But included yet another pitch to have all my healthcare information accessible online (no thanks!) as it will be their primary method of communication.

Wisconsin ranks a poor 34th among the 50 US states, for putting vaccines received to work in patients, with [B]51.8%[/B] of what was received, administered as of today. Not far from the dead last spot for US states, at 44.4%, but far from first at 86.7%, despite having some excellent health care facilities. Yet [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrea_Palm"]Andrea Palm[/URL] moves up to the federal level. [URL]https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/public-health/states-ranked-by-percentage-of-covid-19-vaccines-administered.html[/URL]

Uncwilly 2021-01-27 01:41

[QUOTE=kriesel;570189]This poll may need choices by quarter-year, not by month, to span the possible duration.[/QUOTE]
Maybe not:
[URL="https://www.npr.org/sections/president-biden-takes-office/2021/01/26/960857706/the-biden-administration-is-working-to-buy-200-million-more-covid-19-vaccine-dos"]https://www.npr.org/sections/president-biden-takes-office/2021/01/26/960857706/the-biden-administration-is-working-to-buy-200-million-more-covid-19-vaccine-dos [/URL]
[QUOTE]Updated at 5:46 p.m. ET [Jan 26]

President Biden announced Tuesday that his administration is working to purchase an additional 200 million doses of the two COVID-19 vaccines that have been authorized for emergency use, with the goal, the White House says, of having enough vaccine supply for the entire adult U.S. population by the end of the summer.

He also announced steps to increase vaccine doses going to state and local governments over the next three weeks, and to provide them more clarity going forward about how much supply they should expect.[/QUOTE]

LaurV 2021-01-27 02:48

[QUOTE=Batalov;570176]Ah, forgot - and I am done with the 2nd shot.[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE=pinhodecarlos;570177]Great stuff Batalov. Keep us updated.[/QUOTE]
Like in, did you grow any horns, tail, hooves, etc. after vaccination? Anything that would make the oneill happy? :razz:

Batalov 2021-01-27 06:10

[QUOTE]In theory, there is no difference between practice and theory. In practice, there is.[/QUOTE]
Wouldn't it be nice if I could say that I can now walk on water and can drink methanol for the fun of it and nothing happens to me if I do.
In reality, I have some upper lung congestion, and some sinusitis too. But I console myself with a thought that maybe I could have had a gross disease and instead got a toy one.
I am going to check antibodies level in a few weeks, then I will know if I simply walked off the serious COV on foot.

Now, 2 weeks after 2nd shot, I should be quite safe. I am not 35 anymore, you know... Can't be too careful.

kriesel 2021-01-27 09:45

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;570194]Maybe not:
[URL="https://www.npr.org/sections/president-biden-takes-office/2021/01/26/960857706/the-biden-administration-is-working-to-buy-200-million-more-covid-19-vaccine-dos"]https://www.npr.org/sections/president-biden-takes-office/2021/01/26/960857706/the-biden-administration-is-working-to-buy-200-million-more-covid-19-vaccine-dos [/URL][/QUOTE]Thanks for the link.
"End of summer" is early September, variously defined as September 1 or Labor Day, or the [URL="https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/autumnal-equinox.html"]autumn equinox[/URL] September 22. Already beyond the poll choices. Dose count < patient count since some take 2 each, spoilage is not zero, etc.
That's for supply goal. Injection into patients lags actual delivered usable supply to the states. In many states, quite substantially to date. Federal goals and actual pharma production are only part of the issue.
Viewing the numbers I posted earlier the other way around, there is a drastic variation of how much vaccine as a percentage that individual states have received but have not yet used, from 55.6% worst case to 13.3% best case, a ratio of ~4.18!
Wisconsin at 48.2% unused yet is much closer to the worst case (0.87 times) than the best case (3.62 times!)

[URL]https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations[/URL] also shows substantial lag between distribution and use, and Wisconsin is among several states mapped there as lagging furthest behind relative to the national per capita rates of injection to date.

The exceptionally long lag in Wisconsin appears to be partly bureaucratic, getting government permission to apply this particular vaccine by getting "registered". [URL]https://www.wearegreenbay.com/news/local-news/wisconsin-experiencing-delays-in-phased-distribution-of-covid-19-vaccine/[/URL]
Poor state level planning and communication have plagued Wisconsin's effort. [URL]https://townhall.com/columnists/mdkittle/2020/12/17/vaccines-for-most-vulnerable-delayed-n2581736[/URL]

On a more positive note, [URL]https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/2021/01/08/wisconsin-covid-19-vaccine-rollout-plan-who-get-and-when/6595772002/[/URL] includes one estimate of getting the Wisconsin general population vaccinated by early summer. That would imply ramping over time up to a peak of perhaps an order of magnitude increase in supply rate and more than that of use above current Wisconsin rates (and completing sooner than the federal supply goal, which seems unrealistic).
Use rate should eventually outpace supply rate. Vaccines can only be effective after use. Hundreds of thousands of doses sit in Wisconsin unused while many more of the most at-risk wait.

storm5510 2021-01-27 17:28

[QUOTE=Batalov;570206]...Now, 2 weeks after 2nd shot, I should be quite safe. I am not 35 anymore, you know... [B]Can't be too careful[/B].[/QUOTE]

Can't be too careful is very true. I have mentioned my sister who works with COVID-19 patients previously. She received her 2nd shot on January 11. She told me that, by early February, she would be [U]90%[/U] protected. She never mentioned if this number would rise any higher. I will ask, but contact with her is really sporadic.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-01-27 19:02

Having missed the first slots, I called yesterday (January 26) and got booked for today. I received email confirmation 20 minutes later, with consent form and map showing parking entrances at the location attached. I went in and received my first COVID-19 vaccine just before 9:00 this morning. The RN who administered the vaccine gave me a card with the date for the second shot stamped in red ink. They had me wait around for 15 minutes afterward to make sure I wasn't going to keel over right away. The Health Department will call me to schedule the second shot.

So far, I have experienced only some slight soreness and stiffness in the shoulder where I took the shot.

There is absolutely no indication of any genetic mutation. As you can see, my appearance remains completely normal.

:hmm:

VBCurtis 2021-01-28 22:59

I also got poked today, Pfizer flavor.

a1call 2021-01-28 23:48

@Dr. S.
What happened to your glasses?
Are you using contact-lenses or did your vision go 20/20 after the shot?
As for Canada, we have no production capacity and are totally dependent on shipments from Europe which might be jeopardized if Europe passes Europe 1st laws which US has already in place. This week we will receive 0 shipments due to plant retooling and and 1/4 of the vaccines contracted the week after that.
There is a senior citizen in Quebec who received 2 shots by mistake. One from Pfizer and the other from Moderna.

storm5510 2021-01-29 02:03

95% is as good as it ever gets. Anyone not understanding what this is about, go up to my previous.

kriesel 2021-01-29 14:41

[QUOTE=kriesel;570189]Wisconsin ranks a poor 34th among the 50 US states, for putting vaccines received to work in patients, with [B]51.8%[/B] of what was received, administered as of today. Not far from the dead last spot for US states, at 44.4%, but far from first at 86.7%, despite having some excellent health care facilities. Yet [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrea_Palm"]Andrea Palm[/URL] moves up to the federal level. [URL]https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/public-health/states-ranked-by-percentage-of-covid-19-vaccines-administered.html[/URL][/QUOTE]As of this morning, Wisconsin is now listed as [B]49th[/B] out of 50 US states, 42.45% used, probably reflective of recently received shipments. Over 360,000 received by Wisconsin but unused ATM. Alabama is listed at #50 at 42.03%
It seems the number of virus variants has increased too. Maybe not so good for expected immunity after vaccination, as occurs with the many flu strains and vaccination.
At least the following variants are identified in [URL="https://www.today.com/health/how-many-strains-covid-19-exist-covid-19-variant-guide-t207173"]this Today article[/URL] presumably in addition to the originally sequenced Wuhan:
Ohio COH.20G/501Y
UK V.1.1.7
South Africa B.1.351
Brazil P.1
California Cal.20C
[URL]https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/mediaroom/pressreleaselisting/new-sars-cov2-variant[/URL] mentions an unnamed variant found in only one Columbus OH patient at the time
The early news in the Today article of vaccine effectiveness vs. variant is concerning but not alarming; weaker but still regarded as sufficient immune response. More infectious but not determined to be more deadly. Vaccine makers and medical researchers are responding.

pinhodecarlos 2021-01-30 16:46

WHO urges Britain to pause Covid jabs after treating vulnerable


[url]https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/30/who-urges-britain-to-pause-covid-jabs-after-treating-vulnerable[/url]

The Carnivore 2021-01-30 21:13

[QUOTE=storm5510;570373]95% is as good as it ever gets. Anyone not understanding what this is about, go up to my previous.[/QUOTE]
Now here are some that are not as good:
2 doses required, 70% effective: [url]https://www.healthline.com/health-news/the-astrazeneca-vaccine-is-between-62-and-90-effective-what-we-know[/url]
1 dose required, 66% effective: [url]https://www.statnews.com/2021/01/29/jj-one-dose-covid-vaccine-is-66-effective-a-weapon-but-not-a-knockout-punch/[/url]

If less effective vaccines are approved for use in the US, can the general public choose which vaccine to get? If not, it would potentially make the situation worse. A considerable number of people who aren't eligible to get vaccinated yet would try to jump the line at all costs instead of waiting, since the choice would be to get a superior vaccine now or an inferior one later. And once the less effective ones are rolled out, many of those who receive them would try to get vaccinated again so that they have another chance at getting the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine.

lavalamp 2021-01-30 21:26

[QUOTE=pinhodecarlos;570507]WHO urges Britain to pause Covid jabs after treating vulnerable[/QUOTE]That doesn't sound like something our isolationist government would consider.

storm5510 2021-01-31 00:48

[QUOTE=The Carnivore;570520]If less effective vaccines are approved for use in the US, can the general public choose which vaccine to get? If not, it would potentially make the situation worse. A considerable number of people who aren't eligible to get vaccinated yet would try to jump the line at all costs instead of waiting, since the choice would be to get a superior vaccine now or an inferior one later. And once the less effective ones are rolled out, many of those who receive them would try to get vaccinated again so that they have another chance at getting the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine.[/QUOTE]

Question: Would the FDA allow vaccines of lower quality to be used here?

Uncwilly 2021-01-31 01:34

[QUOTE=storm5510;570536]Question: Would the FDA allow vaccines of lower quality to be used here?[/QUOTE]
IIRC Salk is less effective than the Sabin for Polio. If there is a different production pathway that can turn out a large amount of a 60% effective vaccine, that can be given to part of the population. It will drop the R[SUB]0[/SUB] in that group (which will reduce the loading on the hospitals). Giving the 95% effective vax to everyone that can be supplied by that manufacturing chain will reduce the transmission in that group even more. After everyone has had a vax from either group, those from the lessor group could get the vax from the more effective type. Stopping the spread and getting a large part of the population immune work hand in hand. Also, the J&J vaccine does not require the strict cold chain of the mRNA. So that can be deployed in more rural areas, small military outposts, first nation villages, etc. There is room for both types of vaccines to work together. Also, having more supply chains will allow more to be delivered world wide. Cold chain will be an issue for some areas around the world. Getting small towns vaccinated with a 60% effective vax will help stop the spread. And that gives a chance for contact tracing to be used. Masks, distancing, and other measures get a big effectiveness 'shot in the arm' when more than half of the population can't get the disease.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-01-31 02:50

[QUOTE=The Carnivore;570520]<snip>
If less effective vaccines are approved for use in the US, can the general public choose which vaccine to get? If not, it would potentially make the situation worse. A considerable number of people who aren't eligible to get vaccinated yet would try to jump the line at all costs instead of waiting, since the choice would be to get a superior vaccine now or an inferior one later.[/QUOTE]So far, the vaccine isn't available to the general public. There just isn't enough vaccine for that. Yet.

I'm not sure a vaccination site would want to have more than one type of vaccine on hand at any one time. The storage and use requirements are different. There might also be an increased chance of record keeping errors if more than one kind of vaccine was on hand at the same time.

If there's a mass vaccination site taking all comers at some point, my guess is you get Hobson's choice. You take whatever shot happens to be available then, or you leave.

As I understand it, the supplies of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines will increase in the coming months, so I don't foresee either becoming unavailable.

People are [i]already[/i] cutting in line. Here in the good ol' USA, some of our young, physically healthy congress critters have done so legally. Some other elites are also being allowed to get the shot before us little people. In Canada, [url=https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9186273/Casino-CEO-wife-arrested-flying-remote-Canada-vaccinated-indigenous-people.html]Rodney Baker and his wife Ekaterina[/url] chartered a flight to a remote area and posed as motel workers to get vaccinated. They got arrested - not for their imposture to get the shot, but for violating isolation protocols and not following their signed declarations. They were fined, but the fines are chump change for them. I don't know whether there is any prospect of jail time in their case. The maximum possible is six months.

[color=red][b]Uncwilly[/b][/color] has already covered the advantages of complementary deployment of different types of vaccine based on logistical considerations.

Uncwilly 2021-01-31 03:34

Since Merck has dropped their vaccine, it is not out of the realm of possibility that Biden might sweet talk them (Defense Production Act) into producing Pfizer or Moderna's version. The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine might come into the mix in the USA too.

Countries that have their own that are ~50% effective jabs would do well to not wait for a higher effectiveness model to become available. Slow the spread. Every new case is another new chance at a bad mutation popping up.

A 50% effective vax for Ebola or Marburg would be welcomed in some areas.

An R[SUB]0[/SUB] of 0.75 is much preferred to one of 1.5 (just hypothetical numbers).

pinhodecarlos 2021-01-31 18:14

UK vaccinates almost 600,000 people in single day for first time
([url]https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/uk-vaccine-rollout-record-highest-b918093.html[/url])

The mass vaccination centre in Milton Keynes will be opening on the 8th February and will require a large number of volunteers. Call for volunteers is underway. Is the empire reborn? Wow!!

storm5510 2021-01-31 18:26

[URL="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/jan/27/most-poor-nations-will-take-until-2024-to-achieve-mass-covid-19-immunisation?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook&fbclid=IwAR1fmNBPySSGv7dW7Pvz09QwnZfkk_kg6IP262q5dweCJnYBMAmkMxjN3FQ"]Most poor nations 'will take until 2024 to achieve mass Covid-19 immunization.'[/URL]

I don't know how trustworthy this source is. It may be of no more value than the tabloids in the grocery check-out lanes.

The Carnivore 2021-01-31 19:06

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;570542]After everyone has had a vax from either group, those from the lessor group could get the vax from the more effective type.[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570544]
If there's a mass vaccination site taking all comers at some point, my guess is you get Hobson's choice. You take whatever shot happens to be available then, or you leave.[/quote]

So let's say that you're offered the less effective vaccine now, but not the more effective one. There are a few possibilities:

Option A - Get the inferior vax now. Since you already got the vax, you won't get the superior vax until after everyone has had a vax from either group, which could take until August or so.

Option B - Get the inferior vax now. Unfortunately, getting that vax now will significantly reduce the effectiveness of the superior vax, so there'll be no point in taking it. You'll never be close to fully protected, which is a definite possibility: [url]https://khn.org/morning-breakout/new-results-confirm-astrazenecas-half-dose-mistake-is-90-effective/[/url]
"Two full doses given at least one month apart appeared to be 62% effective, while a half dose followed by a full dose was about 90% effective."

Option C - Decline the inferior vax now. Since you're unvaccinated, you'll have a chance to get the superior vax much sooner than the scenario in Option A, perhaps by March or April.

I would take option C without any hesitation.

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570544]
People are [i]already[/i] cutting in line. Here in the good ol' USA, some of our young, physically healthy congress critters have done so legally. Some other elites are also being allowed to get the shot before us little people. In Canada, [url=https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9186273/Casino-CEO-wife-arrested-flying-remote-Canada-vaccinated-indigenous-people.html]Rodney Baker and his wife Ekaterina[/url] chartered a flight to a remote area and posed as motel workers to get vaccinated. They got arrested - not for their imposture to get the shot, but for violating isolation protocols and not following their signed declarations. They were fined, but the fines are chump change for them. I don't know whether there is any prospect of jail time in their case. The maximum possible is six months.
[/QUOTE]
True, but the problem is going to get a lot worse if the less effective vaccines roll out and if people aren't allowed to choose which vaccine they get. I know a few folks who're willing to wait their turn, but if waiting means getting an inferior vaccine, they're going to try to get the vaccine ASAP by any means necessary, whether legal or not.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-01-31 20:46

[QUOTE=The Carnivore;570599]So let's say that you're offered the less effective vaccine now, but not the more effective one. There are a few possibilities:
<snip>[/quote]
Since the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are the only ones which have EUA so far, I'd say all three of your options are nugatory at present.[quote]True, but the problem is going to get a lot worse if the less effective vaccines roll out and if people aren't allowed to choose which vaccine they get. I know a few folks who're willing to wait their turn, but if waiting means getting an inferior vaccine, they're going to try to get the vaccine ASAP by any means necessary, whether legal or not.[/QUOTE]I really don't see what you're basing this assertion on.

As I understand it, Pfizer and Moderna have already committed to producing 400 million doses for the US by the end of July. That's enough for 200 million people. The Biden Administration is working on procuring another 200 million doses of those vaccines. If that effort is successful, there will be enough of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for 300 million people. The goal is to have enough for the entire adult population by the end of summer.

My guess is that by the time the vaccines become available to the general public, people will be able to get the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine locally, whether through a public mass vaccination program, through their employer, or at a pharmacy.

MooMoo2 2021-02-01 21:24

As of today, the number of Americans who've ever tested positive for the virus (26.0 million) is roughly equal to the number of Americans who've received at least one dose of the vaccine (also 26.0 million):

[url]https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations[/url]

Personally, I know quite a few people who've tested positive, but I don't know of anyone who's gotten the vaccine. They're either not eligible, eligible but unable to get an appointment, or eligible but chose not to get the vaccine anytime soon. Maybe I'm hanging out with the wrong crowd...

Uncwilly 2021-02-02 00:26

I got mine (first dose). Because of reasons the folks overseeing the jabbing asked me to wait around double.

storm5510 2021-02-03 20:07

My first scheduled dose is on March 15. These are being done in 20 minute increments from one person to the next. This seems like a lot of time wasting. :ermm:

xilman 2021-02-03 20:44

I won't vote yet, but SWMBO just booked her appointments.

henryzz 2021-02-03 22:20

Apparently, the trick to get an early vaccine in the UK is to volunteer for the last shift of the day at a vax centre. There will be vaccines they have to finish at the end of the day. Volunteers may get offered them.

Viliam Furik 2021-02-04 01:24

1 Attachment(s)
I will probably poke hornet nest by this post, but I will do it anyway.

This aired on our national TV. You only need to know that it is poll results about vaccination opinions and "Áno" means yes, "Nie" means no, and "Neviem" means "I don't know".

I hope everyone can see what's my opinion on the thing (both the vaccination and the propaganda behind it).

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-04 02:21

[QUOTE=Viliam Furik;570814]I will probably poke hornet nest by this post, but I will do it anyway.

This aired on our national TV. You only need to know that it is poll results about vaccination opinions and "Áno" means yes, "Nie" means no, and "Neviem" means "I don't know".

I hope everyone can see what's my opinion on the thing (both the vaccination and the propaganda behind it).[/QUOTE]This may be a silly question, but why don't the percentages add up to anything even close to 100 percent? They add up to 54% in the first chart, and to 60% in the second. Are over 40% simply refusing to participate in the poll?

Batalov 2021-02-04 02:33

Some people estimated that out of 331M U.S. population only 100M will agree to vaccinate and that the 100 first day- Biden administration plan (to have 100M vaccinated), the vaccinations will taper out.

But then again, opinions [URL="https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2020-12-28/number-of-americans-willing-to-get-covid-19-vaccine-continues-to-rise"]might change[/URL]. Gallup poll recently showed more like 6 out of 10 willing to vaccinate.

LaurV 2021-02-04 02:36

:lol:
Your people have a problem not only with the vaccine, but also with counting percents in correspondence to area fractions :rofl:
edit: crosspost, the reply was to Viliam's
edit 2: @Dr.S, nope, not missing population, it is just propaganda/bullshit graphs, otherwise why the 21% area in the second chart be much larger than the 29% one? Some idiot made the graph without even thinking.

Viliam Furik 2021-02-04 07:39

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570818]This may be a silly question, but why don't the percentages add up to anything even close to 100 percent? They add up to 54% in the first chart, and to 60% in the second. Are over 40% simply refusing to participate in the poll?[/QUOTE]

That's the thing, they don't, and anybody sane will suspect it's intentional.

@LaurV: Exactly.

retina 2021-02-04 08:45

Obviously the small print in the dot of the [b]j[/b] has the following text:[quote]Intended for entertainment purposes only, and in no way is it meant to be representative of any situation either real or fictional.[/quote]

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-04 13:47

[QUOTE=LaurV;570820]<snip>
Your people have a problem not only with the vaccine, but also with counting percents in correspondence to area fractions :rofl:
<snip>[/QUOTE]Funny thing about that. My mind goes for numbers first. And when those numbers on those charts didn't add up, the areas simply became meaningless. I was [i]seeing[/i] that the 21% area was bigger than the 29% area, but the thought wasn't registering. I was experiencing the [i]darndest[/i] sensation. My mind had [i]already[/i] concluded that the whole thing was totally meaningless, so was refusing to analyze it any further. And as soon as I saw your comment, my immediate thought was, [i]That's it![/i]

Based on my own experience over the last several years, I would speculate that the Slovakian government has been treating its people like mushrooms[sup]†[/sup] since long before the COVID-19 pandemic began, and they simply don't [i]care[/i] that they're spewing utter nonsense.

[sup]†[/sup]Keeping them in the dark, piling s:censored:t on them, and expecting them to grow

xilman 2021-02-04 16:13

Just returned home with SWMBO aftershe had her first CV19 jab.

Uncwilly 2021-02-04 16:41

[QUOTE=xilman;570857]Just returned home with SWMBO aftershe had her first CV19 jab.[/QUOTE]You should offer her a warm/hot beverage (aka a cuppa). Tomorrow her arm will be sore as if someone punched her.

xilman 2021-02-04 20:10

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;570859]You should offer her a warm/hot beverage (aka a cuppa). Tomorrow her arm will be sore as if someone punched her.[/QUOTE]She beat me to it, with a mug of tomato soup.

No adverse reactions yet. This was the O-AZ version.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-04 21:35

[QUOTE=xilman;570857]Just returned home with SWMBO aftershe had her first CV19 jab.[/QUOTE]If there's no soreness to alleviate, so much the better! If there's some (but not a lot of) stiffness and soreness around the injection site, light to moderate use of the arm might help. I had long since been so advised when receiving flu shots. Using my arms has indeed helped alleviate the stiffness and soreness, both with flu shots and with my first COVID shot. If using the arm makes the soreness worse, stop using the arm.

I've been told the reaction to the second shot might be worse than to the first.

My aunt and uncle got vaccinated after my uncle had COVID. His reaction to the shot was mild at first, but after a day or two it became almost like having COVID all over again. My aunt, who lives with him, repeatedly tested negative, and her reaction to the shot wasn't severe AFAIK.

Batalov 2021-02-04 22:37

We have weekly Town Halls with infectious disease heads. Every once in a while you hear excellent, valuable things that make you go 'Hmmmmm...'

Today I heard this: [B]Q:[/B] there are contradicting advices in the news; should I take Tylenol after vac jab or [I]can I take it in advance[/I]?
[B]A:[/B] Best to wait for reaction and [B]then [/B]take Tylenol (and Ibuprofen, too, if needed *). Why? Because these NSAIDs will bump you antiinflammation response and the vac will be less effective. You do want to get a bit (or even quite a bit) sore -- this means immune system started its work. Advice is not to take Tylenol in advance.
_____
* it is also a separate and universal advice: it is ok to take both - because they act on different pathways. they are in different subclasses; this will not be an overdose of either of them. Also [I]drugs.com[/I] is an excellent site to identify pills that you are unsure what they are and/or to check out drug interactions.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-05 01:03

[QUOTE=Batalov;570885]Today I heard this: [B]Q:[/B] there are contradicting advices in the news; should I take Tylenol after vac jab or [I]can I take it in advance[/I]?
[B]A:[/B] Best to wait for reaction and [B]then [/B]take Tylenol (and Ibuprofen, too, if needed *). Why? Because these NSAIDs will bump you antiinflammation response and the vac will be less effective. You do want to get a bit (or even quite a bit) sore -- this means immune system started its work. Advice is not to take Tylenol in advance.[/QUOTE]
Similar advice here - take nothing before, wait on anything after. Acetaminophen preferable to salicylates (like aspirin) or ibuprofen for pain after. Basic idea seems to be let inflammatory response do its thing. Acetaminophen blocks pain signals.


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