mersenneforum.org

mersenneforum.org (https://www.mersenneforum.org/index.php)
-   Lounge (https://www.mersenneforum.org/forumdisplay.php?f=7)
-   -   Tornado swatch. (https://www.mersenneforum.org/showthread.php?t=10457)

xilman 2008-07-06 20:36

Tornado swatch.
 
Not strictly a tornado but a funnel-cloud. Nice photos nonetheless.

[url]http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/lancashire/7492301.stm[/url]


Paul

jasong 2008-07-22 07:23

I have a tornado watch, but the tornado has a Tasmanian devil inside it.

(yes, it's true, I return as a processed canned meat. I will exact vengeance on my enemies by telling silly jokes. I am the off-topic demon, creater of mayhem. Destroyer of useful threads, I laugh at those who flame me. I am like the new Joker(think Batman), except only in Mersenne Forum.)

99.94 2008-07-22 09:41

You're not well, Jason?

jasong 2008-07-22 18:12

[QUOTE=99.94;138151]You're not well, Jason?[/QUOTE]
I'm ok, I just couldn't decide which smilies to use, so I didn't use any.

xilman 2008-07-27 15:04

Whirlwind on IOW
 
Not a tornado, but a nice movie.

[url]http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7520415.stm[/url]


Paul

xilman 2008-08-04 10:16

Another one, the other side of The Channel from the previous:

[url]http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7540484.stm[/url]

Rather more serious this time, with at least three deaths. :sad:


Paul

Brian-E 2008-08-24 17:38

[quote=sayad;139803]thats not a funel clud cause what i know about funnel cloud is that funnel cloud is a funnel-shaped cloud of condensed water droplets, associated with a rotating column of air and extending from the base of a cloud (usually a cumulonimbus or towering cumulus cloud) but not reaching the ground or a water surface. A funnel cloud is usually visible as a cone-shaped or needle like protuberance from the main cloud base. Funnel clouds frequently form in association with supercell thunderstorms.

If a funnel cloud touches the ground it becomes a tornado. Most tornadoes begin as funnel clouds, but many funnel clouds do not make ground contact and so do not become tornadoes. Also, a tornado does not necessarily need to have an associated condensation funnel—if strong cyclonic winds are occurring at the surface, then the feature is a tornado. Some tornadoes may appear only as a debris swirl, with no obvious funnel cloud extending below the rotating cloud base.



(spam deleted)[/quote]
Obviously you're the author of the learned [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funnel_cloud"]Wikipedia article[/URL] on the subject since it uses exactly the same words. Congratulations. And what a brilliant idea to add the informative introduction "thats not a funel clud cause what i know about funnel cloud is" plus your usual relevant link to San Diego Home Insurance specially for the readers of mersenneforum.org . Bravo.

davieddy 2008-08-31 23:49

If Gustav wasn't so potentially serious, the mayor
of New Orleans would make a great comedian.

xilman 2008-09-19 18:51

Waterspout
 
An aquatic member of the species hit Devon yesterday. Nice article and picture here.

[url]http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article4783321.ece[/url]

This one is rather far southwest for UK tornados. Most occur in southern and central England.


Paul

Primeinator 2008-09-20 00:04

I live in the middle of Tornado Alley in the United States. Tornado watches and warnings are very common. We have some unbelievable weather here, and a high respect for mother nature.

xilman 2008-09-20 08:25

[QUOTE=Primeinator;143234]I live in the middle of Tornado Alley in the United States. Tornado watches and warnings are very common. We have some unbelievable weather here, and a high respect for mother nature.[/QUOTE]Post nice pictures from the news sites if you have them.

I started this thread only because many people in the US refuse to believe that the place with the highest number of tornados per square metre per second is southern England, closely followed by The Netherlands.

Tornado Alley undoubtedly gets many more [i]big[/i] tornados than western Europe.


Paul

davieddy 2008-09-20 08:26

[quote=Primeinator;143234]I live in the middle of Tornado Alley in the United States. Tornado watches and warnings are very common. We have some unbelievable weather here, and a high respect for mother nature.[/quote]
I've tried to make this point to Paul before:smile:
Ernst suggested a thread devoted to natural catastophes
rarely fatal in the UK. (We had a noticeable earthquake within
the last year). Don't know when we witnessed a volcano though.

David

Primeinator 2008-09-20 14:57

The picture seen here: [url]http://www.girljournalist.com/wp-content/greensburg_tornado.png[/url] is of the Greensburg tornado that completely wiped out a town here in Kansas May of 2007. It was 1.5 miles at the base (2.4 km or 2,400 meters).

xilman 2008-11-12 10:28

[url]http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/weather/article5134406.ece[/url] describes this one as a "freak". Fair description; they're not very common at this time of year.

Paul

xilman 2010-12-31 17:31

Tornado hits Cincinnati
 
[url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-12100240[/url]

Paul

xilman 2011-04-24 19:15

St Louis airport
 
Another one hits the news.

[url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-13182348[/url]

Paul

Christenson 2011-04-25 01:21

About 5 years ago, in the Charlottesville, VA (actually Scottsville, about 17 miles south) area, I came home one day to the ground carpeted with green leaves. A few days later, 2-1/2 miles or so down my road, I noticed a 4 or 5-foot diameter tree with a greenstick fracture of the trunk.
Makes me want to think about building that super-reinforced bathroom in my house.

Christenson 2011-04-27 02:47

Had another tornado-like experience tonight, took a *long* time to get home. There's a road (VA 53) that passes through the saddle between Monticello and Carter's Mountain, and, just below that saddle there were half a dozen trees across the road within 100 yards, probably felled about 7PM, with minor damage elsewhere. We had pea-sized hail a few miles away in town.

The long time around was because the alternate route to the south (Route 20) also had a blockage, still not cleared at approximately 10PM tonight.

science_man_88 2011-04-28 17:15

[url]http://ca.news.yahoo.com/death-toll-mounts-storms-rip-central-us-030655026.html[/url]

I think this describes what we ( humans) are up against quite well.

cmd 2011-04-28 20:23

[QUOTE=Primeinator;143234]I live in the middle of Tornado Alley in the United States. Tornado watches and warnings are very common. We have some unbelievable weather here, and a high respect for mother nature.[/QUOTE]

[URL="http://mersenneforum.org/showpost.php?p=241478&postcount=5"]remember[/URL] ..

xilman 2012-06-29 13:10

Non-UK people may not be aware that we are presently suffering the wettest drought on record. According to one report (which I don't take seriously, given that it appeared in [i]Private Eye[/i]) claimed that crack teams of frogmen were being sent in to Surrey to enforce the hosepipe ban.

Anyway, the Beeb has a video of some of the interesting weather we've seen in the last day or so. A Lincolnshire tornado makes its appearance at the 1:43 mark.

[url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-18639312[/url]


Paul

c10ck3r 2012-06-29 14:15

If we are making this the natural catastrophes thread, wildfires (plural) in Colorado are approaching my home state...we also had an [URL="http://www.google.com/imgres?q=kansas+earthquake+2011&um=1&hl=en&biw=1024&bih=619&tbm=isch&tbnid=cRdyL0nnPJp3RM:&imgrefurl=http://www.sunrisewithcoffee.com/uncategorized/our-kansas-earthquake&docid=khOgS9NLU4KzkM&imgurl=http://www.sunrisewithcoffee.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Kansas-Earthquake.jpg&w=526&h=338&ei=SbjtT8C-LqHa0QHktJHMDQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=87&vpy=153&dur=2367&hovh=180&hovw=280&tx=159&ty=204&sig=115137818162980131629&page=1&tbnh=128&tbnw=173&start=0&ndsp=16&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0,i:72"]earthquake[/URL] last year.

Stargate38 2012-06-29 14:20

Lincolnshire? Isn't that where Scunthorpe is? I hope they're alright. That city has had enough problems (mostly content filters).

Dubslow 2012-06-29 18:03

Northern Illinois is suffering something of a drought. We haven't had an honest-to-goodness storm in a month.

Uncwilly 2012-06-29 23:51

[QUOTE=Dubslow;303672]Northern Illinois is suffering something of a drought. We haven't had an honest-to-goodness storm in a month.[/QUOTE]That is May through October in much of the Southwest.

Stargate38 2012-06-30 00:22

Hopefully that cold front in the Northeast US will blow further south. They need it badly.

science_man_88 2012-06-30 01:05

[QUOTE=Stargate38;303696]Hopefully that cold front in the Northeast US will blow further south. They need it badly.[/QUOTE]


I heard one story about a place down in the south US that had 105 one day and expected the next then the next after that to be 104 if it declines 1 fahrenheit every 2 days without extra heat added it'll fall below 32 C in about 32-33 days, so yeah hopefully they get something soon.

c10ck3r 2012-06-30 02:31

South US? That's KS right now!
Canadian benchmark: Smack-dab in the middle of the US, eh?

NBtarheel_33 2012-06-30 03:02

I am on the coast of Maine. It has been in the 70s F/low 20s C here during the day. Much nicer than at home in Maryland, where it was 101F/38C today with a 111F/43C heat index. In Athens, Georgia (my former hometown), they broke an all-time record that dated back to the dust bowl in the 1930s - today's high: 109F/42C. Thankfully the dew point was only in the 40s.

science_man_88 2012-06-30 12:43

[QUOTE=c10ck3r;303703]South US? That's KS right now!
Canadian benchmark: Smack-dab in the middle of the US, eh?[/QUOTE]

it's south for me unless it's alaska

Chuck 2012-06-30 13:03

Tropical storm Debby here; we had 14.25" rain in three days at the beginning of the week. Fortunately no aftereffects for me. Expecting upper 90s for the next few days.

jasonp 2012-07-01 03:44

Friday in the Washington DC area was 104F. After freakishly powerful storms passed through we have 4 deaths, 800,000 people without power and probably 80% of the traffic lights out. About 1 in 5 gas stations has power. This afternoon it was 97F and it will be the same for the next several days. The local power companies estimate it will take all week to get back to normal.

I've never seen it so windy as on Friday night; it lasted about 10 minutes for us, with gusts feeling like 50mph.

Dubslow 2012-07-01 04:03

That storm is the one that missed my tiny part of Chicagoland. Gah, we still haven't had rain (though the rest of Chicagoland is fine now).

(PS Lake effect for the loss)

xilman 2012-07-01 07:23

[QUOTE=jasonp;303774]Friday in the Washington DC area was 104F. After freakishly powerful storms passed through we have 4 deaths, 800,000 people without power and probably 80% of the traffic lights out. About 1 in 5 gas stations has power. This afternoon it was 97F and it will be the same for the next several days. The local power companies estimate it will take all week to get back to normal.

I've never seen it so windy as on Friday night; it lasted about 10 minutes for us, with gusts feeling like 50mph.[/QUOTE]Some impressive pictures here:

[url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-18656648[/url]

Dubslow 2012-07-01 22:47

And again
 
Supposedly some more horrible storms blew through about an hour south of me, again. 90MPH gusts reported in a few places. It sounds like it was exactly the same track as the one from a few days ago.

science_man_88 2012-07-01 22:51

[QUOTE=Dubslow;303825]Supposedly some more horrible storms blew through about an hour south of me, again. 90MPH gusts reported in a few places. It sounds like it was exactly the same track as the one from a few days ago.[/QUOTE]

[URL="http://ca.news.yahoo.com/storm-hits-washington-dc-area-thousands-without-power-035759980.html"]These[/URL] you mean ? I like heat just don't send too much my way.

Dubslow 2012-07-01 22:53

[QUOTE=science_man_88;303826][URL="http://ca.news.yahoo.com/storm-hits-washington-dc-area-thousands-without-power-035759980.html"]These[/URL] you mean ?[/QUOTE]

That's the ones from a few days ago. [i]Another[/i] of those just came through Chicagoland.

Dubslow 2012-07-05 22:33

IT'S FINALLY RAINING! FOR THE FIRST TIME IN A MONTH!!

davieddy 2012-07-05 23:24

[QUOTE=Dubslow;304111]IT'S FINALLY RAINING! FOR THE FIRST TIME IN A MONTH!![/QUOTE]
[URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbKE0gJETA0"]Carol King[/URL]
[URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvB6rrnzDM8"]Dinah Washington[/URL]
[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkUZl_D8giY]Billie Holiday[/url]
D

davieddy 2012-07-05 23:39

This is a headline that gets my goat
 
Lies, damn lies and statistics:

"In June they had the month's worth of rain in one day."
HOW MANY DAYS DO YOU GET RAIN IN JUNE ANYWAY?

D

Xyzzy 2012-07-06 03:23

Rain?

[url]http://www.bankrate.com/finance/personal-finance/places-most-extreme-weather.aspx#slide=5[/url]

LaurV 2012-07-06 03:26

[QUOTE=Dubslow;304111]IT'S FINALLY RAINING! FOR THE FIRST TIME IN A MONTH!![/QUOTE]
Yeah, hooray! Here too. For the third time today. (10:25 in the morning, Thai, rainy season, it rains every day too much). :smile:

Dubslow 2012-07-14 04:58

[url]http://www.weather.com/maps/activity/garden/usdroughtseverity_large.html[/url]

I'm in an orange area. We had out first actual thunder storm for the first time in two months today. (The last storm I went wild about was only 5 minutes of half-hearted rain.)

xilman 2012-07-15 19:15

Tornadoes cause chaos in Poland
 
Nice video of a couple of Polish tornadoes. An impressive swath of demolished woodland at around the 35 second mark.

[url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-18846641[/url]

Dubslow 2012-08-02 23:34

Of the American bent. I'm sure anyone who's read this thread is aware of the fairly severe almost-nationwide drought.

[url]http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/48462414/ns/technology_and_science-science/[/url]

chalsall 2012-08-02 23:44

Barbados to be hit with a Tropical Storm tomorrow...
 
So, Barbados will likely be hit with a semi-major Tropical Storm very early tomorrow morning (our time).

The last time this happened most of the island was without power and water (and, perhaps even worse, Internet (!)) for almost a week.

Wish us luck!!! :smile:

markr 2012-08-03 07:16

[QUOTE=chalsall;306773]So, Barbados will likely be hit with a semi-major Tropical Storm very early tomorrow morning (our time).

The last time this happened most of the island was without power and water (and, perhaps even worse, Internet (!)) for almost a week.

Wish us luck!!! :smile:[/QUOTE]
Looks like it's now mostly passed to the north of Barbados, according to [url]http://barbadosweather.org/MT-Warnings-tbpb.php[/url] (around 7:00UTC), and you're still online according to the forum software - that's a good sign. How do things look? Hope you & yours are okay.

chalsall 2012-08-03 14:15

[QUOTE=markr;306803]How do things look? Hope you & yours are okay.[/QUOTE]

Yup, thanks. A bit blowy through the night and some rain, but no infrastructure damage.

You never know with these things -- kinda the definition of a chaotic system.... :smile:

xilman 2012-09-09 07:24

A couple in NYC
 
[url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-19534104[/url]

markr 2012-10-25 06:25

Fire tornado
 
[url]http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/fire-tornado-towers-over-queensland-outback-20121025-286p3.html[/url]

Firespout?

kladner 2012-10-25 13:10

1 Attachment(s)
[QUOTE=chalsall;306826]Yup, thanks. A bit blowy through the night and some rain, but no infrastructure damage.

You never know with these things -- kinda the definition of a chaotic system.... :smile:[/QUOTE]

I am very glad it missed you.

kladner 2012-10-25 16:33

Potential "perfect storm"?
 
I haven't dug any deeper than this story, yet. I did send it to a friend with much better meteorologic connections to see what he thinks of the idea.

[url]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/25/hurricane-sandy-new-york-delaware_n_2013788.html[/url]

xilman 2015-05-06 15:50

[URL="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-32601555"]Tornado in north Germany[/URL] causes significant damage.

It's been a bit breezy around here for the last couple of days but nothing on that scale.

ewmayer 2015-05-07 00:41

[QUOTE=markr;315887][url]http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/fire-tornado-towers-over-queensland-outback-20121025-286p3.html[/url]

Firespout?[/QUOTE]

Yes, these are actually fairly common in large wildland fires - several such made the evening news here during last year's CA fire season.

Anytime you have strong wind shear - whether generated by colliding warm/cold frontal boundaries or (for firestorms) by strong local convective currents, the resulting concentrated vorticity has the potential to lead to a tornado-like funnel with not only strong centrifugal flows but also axial ones. The latter are what suck whatever ground-level 'stuff' is around into the funnel, be it dirt and debris (classic land tornado - debris can include large objects such as cows, cars, homes, girls holding small dogs, &c - even entire Hollywood film crews have been sighted swirling around, with cameras rolling to boot), water (waterspout, a.k.a. tornado over water), fire ... I expect even 'snowspouts' are possible; have not seen such a one personally but have experienced 'thundersnow', which contains all the needed elements.

xilman 2015-06-15 20:17

[URL="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-33136737"]UK's 'tornado alley' identified[/URL]

TL;DR: very common but usually rather feeble.

xilman 2016-11-17 18:22

More[URL="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-38016701"] UK tornadoes[/URL]. Damage but no (known) injuries.

When driving home around 1:30pm after a sauna in town, it was [b]very[/b] windy and rainy in Cambridge, though no tornadoes were spotted. The roads were awash and the air full of of bits of trees ranging in size from leaves, through twigs, up to branches over a metre long and a cm or few thick. No entire trees fell over while I was watching.

Really quite an interesting drive.

jasong 2016-11-21 02:58

I'm going to try to Google simulations of how UK tornadoes form. I've only even learned about American tornadoes.

xilman 2017-12-03 09:29

Here's an [URL="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-europe-42204016/sanremo-tornado-huge-waterspout-forms-off-italian-coast"]amphibian member of the species[/URL].

xilman 2018-05-29 12:13

Light entertainment.
 
[QUOTE=xilman;473030]Here's an [URL="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-europe-42204016/sanremo-tornado-huge-waterspout-forms-off-italian-coast"]amphibian member of the species[/URL].[/QUOTE]

And here is a [URL="www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-us-canada-44287981/waterspout-emerges-from-florida-storm"]cute little baby one[/URL].

Dr Sardonicus 2018-05-29 13:57

The most monstrous tornado I am aware of is the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tri-State_Tornado]Tri-state tornado[/url] of March 18, 1925. It left the longest tornado track (150 - 235 miles) ever recorded, up to a mile wide. It moved at 60 mph or more along the ground, faster than cars of the day. It crossed both the Mississippi and Wabash rivers, putting the lie to the myth that tornadoes can't cross major rivers. It killed 695 people, far more than any other tornado ever recorded.

Uncwilly 2018-05-29 14:44

A friend rode out the [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Joplin_tornado"]2011 Joplin Tornado[/URL] (EF5) in his bathtub (in a second floor apartment). His building was across the street from the WalMart and near the Home Depot that was flattened.

Here is a good image of the location along the path. [url]https://www.nist.gov/sites/default/files/images/2017/08/15/13EL018_joplin_aerial_HR.jpg[/url]
from [url]https://www.nist.gov/blogs/taking-measure/resilience-rises-tragedy-joplin[/url]

kriesel 2018-05-29 15:45

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;488562]A friend rode out the [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Joplin_tornado"]2011 Joplin Tornado[/URL] (EF5) in his bathtub (in a second floor apartment). His building was across the street from the WalMart and near the Home Depot that was flattened.

Here is a good image of the location along the path. [URL]https://www.nist.gov/sites/default/files/images/2017/08/15/13EL018_joplin_aerial_HR.jpg[/URL]
from [URL]https://www.nist.gov/blogs/taking-measure/resilience-rises-tragedy-joplin[/URL][/QUOTE]

That aerial shot certainly puts the lie to the myth that tornadoes are rural phenomena.
Years ago I was gathering storm-damage firewood after a tornado had gone through Madison WI including the UW Research Park, felling centenarian oak trees up to 4 feet (1.2m) trunk diameter, exploding garages, etc. A passerby invited me to go to a specific address for more. The storm had hit while the family that lived there were on vacation. It turned out he was cutting downed trees for a friend he'd met on a south pacific island as their Peace Corps assignment. One Saturday there were dozens of people working on cleaning up the friend's yard from dozens of downed oak trees (all the mature trees), which involved one pickup after another driving deep into his yard to be loaded, and a shoulder-high berm of small limbs spanning most of the 175 foot (53m) length of his lot line at street-side waiting for the city to pick up. People brought their own saws and trailers and lunches and beverages, and lunch break evolved quickly into a multicultural potluck. One fellow working in old blue scrubs was a surgeon who had been a farm kid a couple hours drive north of Tokyo. The house on the lot fared surprisingly well by comparison to the trees; all the windows on the porch were gone, but the well constructed brick home had little damage otherwise. Probably a good choice for an address on Hilltop Drive.
It's that time of year again. [URL]https://www.weather.gov/grb/WI_tornado_stats[/URL]

The 1992 tornado that cut through the town of Dunn tore out power lines, twisted off trees and damaged numerous houses. A coworker's home was one of the more fortunate in an affected development. After getting permission to pass through the sheriff's checkpoint to help clean up the coworker's yard of debris from other people's homes, we saw one house that had lost an entire side's exterior wall, from foundation to roof line, like a full scale dollhouse, making it unsafe to occupy. The daughter's bedroom on the second floor had a perfectly made bed and stuffed animals and other toys still perched where they belonged. Another lot that had contained a home had been swept clean, with only a concrete pad and very little debris remaining. Twisted broken pieces of roof truss members and other building material were scattered miles downwind. The town hall implemented a lost and found for personal belongings found all over. Some material with identifying information on it was found as far away as Milwaukee, 80 miles east (and some possibly went further and landed in Lake Michigan). As the sun set at the end of an evening of hard cleanup work, looking to the west we could see days later there was still aerosol fiberglass wafting eastward, and partial batts hanging in the surviving trees. [URL]https://www.homefacts.com/tornadoes/Wisconsin/Dane-County/Madison.html[/URL]

Even the "little" ones can make a big impression and a big difference. In one of the lower rated ones, a Stoughton WI man took shelter in his basement and was killed by his chimney breaking and falling on him.

kriesel 2018-05-29 16:22

[QUOTE=xilman;447335]More[URL="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-38016701"] UK tornadoes[/URL]. Damage but no (known) injuries.

When driving home around 1:30pm after a sauna in town, it was [B]very[/B] windy and rainy in Cambridge, though no tornadoes were spotted. The roads were awash and the air full of of bits of trees ranging in size from leaves, through twigs, up to branches over a metre long and a cm or few thick. No entire trees fell over while I was watching.

Really quite an interesting drive.[/QUOTE]

At least it was no flying cows. [URL]https://ffilms.org/twister-1996/[/URL]

Uncwilly 2018-05-29 18:16

[QUOTE=kriesel;488567]That aerial shot certainly puts the lie to the myth that tornadoes are rural phenomena.[/QUOTE]
There is footage here of a twister hitting Los Angeles: [URL="http://wgntv.com/2014/12/13/watch-rare-tornado-ravages-los-angeles/"]http://wgntv.com/2014/12/13/watch-rare-tornado-ravages-los-angeles/[/URL]
[QUOTE]Los Angeles hasn't seen a tornado for the past few years, but a study in the 1990s showed that "the amount of tornadoes we get in the L.A. basin is comparable to what they get in the Midwest but it's much weaker," Sukup said.[/QUOTE]

And there was an EF2 that hit the Convention Center in downtown [URL="http://www.welikela.com/last-tornado-los-angeles/"]http://www.welikela.com/last-tornado-los-angeles/[/URL]

xilman 2019-03-04 09:42

[URL="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47436809"]These were particularly vicious ones.[/URL]

Dr Sardonicus 2019-03-04 13:30

Tornadoes in the South this time of year are a sure sign of Spring, but the current crop us unusually powerful.

Meanwhile, a bit to the north (and possibly related), what one TV weather man I once listened to would call "a cold front with a bad attitude" is sending the central part of the US into the freezer again. It isn't as [i]deep[/i] a freeze as the Arctic blast around the end of January, but subzero temps(*) in March are a bit unusual for a lot of the areas affected.

Apart from the human misery and likely traffic problems, this cold snap will probably kill leaf and flower buds on a lot of trees.

(*) Subzero [i]Fahrenheit[/i], or south of -17.7 Centigrade. Old Man Winter ain't going down without a fight this year.

Dr Sardonicus 2019-03-05 14:47

[QUOTE=xilman;510090][URL="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47436809"]These were particularly vicious ones.[/URL][/QUOTE]
In a BBC story, a reporter on the scene pointed to debris, saying it had been inside a trailer home across the road. He also mentioned a car being picked up by the tornado, and found a kilometer (about 3/5 of a mile) away. Also a billboard being picked up, and found [i]30 miles[/i] away. The Sheriff talked about there being just slabs where houses had stood.

Xyzzy 2020-03-08 13:03

Fire tornadoes: [url]https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/07/asia/japan-tokyo-fire-raids-operation-meetinghouse-intl-hnk[/url]

Dr Sardonicus 2020-03-08 14:09

The recent tornado outbreak in Tennessee had [i]Il Duce[/i] visiting to survey the damage in Nashville. Nashville has a population of well over 650,000 and is the capital of the State of Tennessee. One of the tornadoes went through the downtown area.

So much for tornadoes not hitting the downtown areas of major cities. And this was a powerful tornado. According to [url=https://www.weather.gov/ohx/DamageSurveysfromMarch3]National Weather Service[/url]:

[quote]Tornado #3 - Davidson/Wilson/Smith County EF-3 Tornado...

Rating: EF3
Estimated Peak Wind: 165 mph
Path Length /statute/: 60.13 miles
Path Width /maximum/: 800.0 yards
Fatalities: 5
Injuries: 220

Start Date: 03/03/2020
Start Time: 12:32 AM CST
Start Location: 7 NE Pegram / Davidson County / TN
Start Lat/Lon: 36.1735 / -86.958

End Date: 03/03/2020
End Time: 01:32 AM CST
End Location: 3 SE Gordonsville / Smith County / TN
End Lat/Lon: 36.1536 / -85.8905

Survey Summary:
A strong long-track tornado tracked across Davidson and Wilson
Counties and into Smith County early on March 3 resulting in 5
fatalities and 220 injuries. The tornado began in far western
Davidson County and rapidly intensified into EF-2 intensity as it
tracked across John C. Tune Airport and into the North Nashville
and Germantown areas. The tornado intensified further to EF-3
intensity as it tracked into East Nashville, with the most
significant damage occuring in and around the Five Points
neighborhood, where two fatalities occurred. EF-1 and EF-2 damage
continued across the Cumberland River before the tornado
strengthened again to EF-3 intensity in the Stanford Estates
subdivision in Donelson. EF-2 damage was observed across Hermitage
and the remainder of Davidson County.

The tornado strengthened to EF-3 intensity for a third time upon
entering Wilson County, with a 6-mile swath of EF-3 damage
observed near the Mt. Juliet area, where three more fatalities
occurred. EF-1 and EF-2 damage continued along a path that
paralleled and occasionally crossed Interstate 40 south-southeast
of Lebanon. Once the tornado moved into Smith County, it weakened
some but was still causing significant tree and powerline damage,
as well as damage to homes. Just south of Gordonsville, the
tornado caused a mobile home to flip, along with destroying
several barns and outbuildings. The tornado finally lifted just
south of I-40 near Highway 141/Lancaster Highway.[/quote]

kriesel 2020-03-08 14:54

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;510168]In a BBC story, a reporter on the scene pointed to debris, saying it had been inside a trailer home across the road. He also mentioned a car being picked up by the tornado, and found a kilometer (about 3/5 of a mile) away. Also a billboard being picked up, and found [I]30 miles[/I] away. The Sheriff talked about there being just slabs where houses had stood.[/QUOTE]
Town of Dunn in Wisconsin, south of Madison WI, was hit long ago. One of my coworkers lived on the track. Fortunately his house was on the lee side of a hill and damage was minor compared to his upwind neighbors. It shifted his screen porch measurably but the structure was intact. ALL their clothing had to be removed from the home and cleaned to remove fiberglass from it. After the complete roadblock was lifted, we coworker volunteers spent several evenings after work removing from his lot debris that was formerly homes. A 30-cubic-yard dumpster was placed on the street at township cost and removed and replaced after it was filled. There were signs of drywall smacking the outside of his house and leaving a print of white powder. Batts of fiberglass hanging in what was left of the trees. Twisted-off pieces of roof truss, and panels of metal roofing from farm buildings, were seen in fields miles downwind.

The town set up a lost and found exchange at the town hall. Smaller objects (bibles, paper mail, etc. with identifying information) were found and returned from various locations, extending as far as near Milwaukee, [B]90[/B] miles east. During one of the cleanup evenings, after depositing debris in the dumpster, returning uphill westward as the sun set, there was still visible aerosolized fiberglass wafting through the air days afterward. We had been breathing fiberglass for hours each cleanup day. On the drive in to his home, one could see various levels of damage, including a bare concrete pad where a home and garage had previously stood, and a house where only the lee side had entirely blown off, yet the stuffed animals and other usual contents were all still in place in the girl's upstairs bedroom in plain view from the road. The same storm twisted oaks off and stacked RVs on each other and removed a lot of overhead electrical distribution wire. [URL]https://www.nytimes.com/1992/06/18/us/tornadoes-rake-5-midwest-states.html[/URL]

In 2005 another tracked through several miles south of the earlier one, which can be read about at [URL]https://www.stoughtontornado.org/faq.php[/URL]. There was a less serious one also in 2014. The township created a public shelter near the trailer park in time for the 2005 or 2014 event, and some employers had created or enhanced hardened areas in their buildings.

Madison WI itself (pop. ~200,000) had been hit on other occasions during that quarter century time span, with car lots within miles of my home then getting inventory stacked on one occasion that was only half an hour before the usual weekly emergency siren test, and on another the university research park losing multiple 150 year old massive oak trees and significant residential area damage to trees and structures.

xilman 2021-06-25 21:28

[url]https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-57605651[/url]

This seems a particularly nasty one. It killed 5 people not too far from where I used to work.

xilman 2021-09-11 10:34

Another fatal one. [url]https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-58524714[/url]

Dr Sardonicus 2021-09-11 12:44

[QUOTE=xilman;587685]Another fatal one. [url]https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-58524714[/url][/QUOTE]That's awful. I wonder when, if ever, there is a previous tornado on Pantelleria recorded in the annals of history.

Tornadoes are much less frequent in Europe than in the US, and my impression is that they are also much less common on islands than on inland continental areas. (Some tornadoes on islands are associated with hurricanes, just as some tornadoes in the lower 48 are associated with the inland remnants of hurricanes after they have made landfall.) Most tornadoes in the US, however, are associated with severe thunderstorms. Conditions in the central US during the summer can be especially favorable for the development of the kinds of thunderstorms that generate tornadoes. A swath including Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska is called "Tornado Alley." Hot, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico meets cooler, drier air from Canada or the Rocky Mountains, and - boom!

Or, garden-variety summer afternoon thunderstorms form on the east side of the Front Range, head east, meet that nice, juicy Gulf air, and "blow up." Tornadoes are a not-rare consequence, but a much more common occurrence in such storms is large hail, e.g. "baseball hail." A baseball is a little under 3 inches (about 7.5 cm) in diameter. Baseball hail can hit at around 100 mph (160 km/hour), the speed of a fastball. It can punch through windows and skylights, and tear wooden siding off houses. I've never had the displeasure, but I've been inside when quarter-sized hail (about 1 inch or 2.5 cm) has been falling, and just the noise of it hitting the roof is terrifying.

xilman 2021-09-11 12:53

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;587692]That's awful. I wonder when, if ever, there is a previous tornado on Pantelleria recorded in the annals of history.

Tornadoes are much less frequent in Europe than in the US, and my impression is that they are also much less common on islands than on inland continental areas.[/QUOTE]We have been here before in this thread.

The region with the highest number of tornadoes per square metre per second (to use the SI unit) is southern England. Second is the Netherlands. It was to counter the popular misconception that I started this thread in the first place.

Here is something from [url]https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/climate-information/extreme-events/us-tornado-climatology[/url] [quote=NOAA] In fact, the United Kingdom has more tornadoes, relative to its land area, than any other country.[/quote]

kriesel 2021-09-11 13:03

Years ago I was at a restaurant in Wisconsin with friends when it began to hail there. I knew my truck was going to get a pounding, but the thought of taking some hail on the head to go move it to sheltered parking was very unappealing. It's been quite a few years, but the dents in the hood and roof have not yet cracked the paint or led to rust. That was maybe quarter size.
More recently, part of eastern Minnesota got baseball size hail, and 6 miles away in Wisconsin, lesser size fell, causing roof damage worthy of insurance claim, but a mile north of that location, there was no apparent damage in asphalt or sheet metal roofing. A year or 2 before that a tornado tracked about 2 miles north of the hail track.
The Dakotas, Minnesota, Iowa and Wisconsin are part of the significantly elevated tornado occurrence area associated with what's sometimes referred to as tornado alley.
[URL]http://strangesounds.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/US-tonado-activity-map.gif[/URL]

Tornadoes and tornado-like weaker systems can form over bodies of water. Then it may track over an island, given enough lifetime and suitable trajectory. [URL]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterspout#Tornadic[/URL]

September is a busy month for this sort of thing. Good luck all.
[QUOTE]number of tornadoes per square metre per second[/QUOTE]That had better be a small number, even when expressed as number/km[SUP]2[/SUP]/day. The EF3 or above map's highest threshold, 15 per odd sized area in ~57 years, corresponds to about 1.13E-7/km[SUP]2[/SUP]/day, 1.3E-18/m[SUP]2[/SUP]/sec.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-09-11 13:21

[QUOTE=xilman;587693]The region with the highest number of tornadoes per square metre per second[/QUOTE]
:rofl:

Uncwilly 2021-09-11 15:28

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;587699]:rofl:[/QUOTE]
Would you prefer square furlongs per fortnight?


Those areas with high counts of twisters, how many above EF-1's do the get? How does that stack up vs "Tornado Alley" in the US of A?

masser 2021-09-11 15:36

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;587711]
Those areas with high counts of twisters, how many above EF-1's do the get? How does that [B]stack up[/B] vs "Tornado Alley" in the US of A?[/QUOTE]

Not well. First of all, the shape is rather inconvenient. And then, the bloody things won't stop moving. It's a nightmare.

kriesel 2021-09-11 16:23

[QUOTE=masser;587712]Not well. First of all, the shape is rather inconvenient. And then, the bloody things won't stop moving. It's a nightmare.[/QUOTE]
Sounds like a job for [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pecos_Bill"]Pecos Bill[/URL].

Dr Sardonicus 2021-09-12 01:35

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;587711][QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;587699]:rofl:[/QUOTE]Would you prefer square furlongs per fortnight?[/quote]No, I was amused by the whole notion of "tornadoes relative to land area." As long as it's "tornadoes per unit time per unit area" using the same units, the ratio between any two given areas will be the same. I take tornadoes per year per 10000 km[sup]2[/sup], as in [url=https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3124716/Britain-s-Tornado-Alley-revealed-Home-Counties-Bristol-Birmingham-risk-twisters.html]this article[/url], whose headline is, perhaps amusingly (my emphasis), [quote]England is tornado capital of the world! More twisters [b]per square mile[/b] than other nation[/quote] The article says England averages 34 tornadoes per year, or 2.2 (per year) per 10000 km[sup]2[/sup].

That gave me an area of about 154000 km[sup]2[/sup], which (after consulting an atlas) appears to be roughly the combined areas of England and Wales.

An average of 34 tornadoes per year is more than a lot of us might expect for the UK - point taken. (It seems most UK tornadoes are weak and of short duration, but they're still tornadoes.)

But look what happens is we apply the idea of "tornadoes per year per 10000 km[sup]2[/sup] to Pantelleria, which just got hit by a tornado. Its area is 83 km[sup]2[/sup], so that one tornado gives roughly 120 tornadoes per 10000 km[sup]2[/sup] per year. Assuming Pantelleria hasn't had any other tornadoes in the last 50 years, over the last 50 years it has it averaged almost as many tornadoes per year per 10000 km[sup]2[/sup] as the UK; and over the last 25 years, it leaves the UK far behind - just from a single tornado.

Harris County, Texas has averaged about 4 tornadoes per year since 1950. Its area is 1777 mi[sup]2[/sup] which is about 4600 km[sup]2[/sup], which gives about 8.7 tornadoes per year per 10000 km[sup]2[/sup].

The US Deep South seems to be getting more frequent tornadoes in recent years, causing some folks to re-think the idea of a single "Tornado Alley" being a narrow swath of the Central Plains.

[quote]Those areas with high counts of twisters, how many above EF-1's do the get? How does that stack up vs "Tornado Alley" in the US of A?[/QUOTE]I have read in several places that most tornadoes in the UK are quite weak (as tornadoes go) and do not last very long.

I find it difficult to compare the severity of tornadoes in the US and the UK, because the US uses a damage scale, the Enhanced Fujita Scale (F0 - F5) while the UK uses a "pure wind-speed scale," the TORRO tornado severity scale (T0-T11). It seems, however, that with either scale, wind speeds are usually inferred from the damage, since direct measurements are generally not available.

I found conflicting figures for the wind speeds of the [url=https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-birmingham-53498921]July 28, 2005 Birmingham tornado[/url], the strongest in the UK in recent history.

xilman 2021-11-15 18:14

Close to home ...
 
As far as I know, this is the first tornado recorded on La Palma. It is the other side of the volcano and about 5km from our place.

[url]https://twitter.com/ElTimeLaPalma/status/1460267053886042117[/url]

Some dramatic videos of lightning have also appeared on the interweb thingy but lightning in volcanic dust clouds is a relatively common phenomenon.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-11-15 23:55

Similar vortex over fissure at Kilauea in 2018 may be viewed [url=https://twitter.com/AnthonyQuintano/status/1001987944897564672]here[/url].

I suspect the meteorologists classify these things as more like "dust devils" than tornadoes, but still...

chalsall 2021-11-16 01:12

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;593195]I suspect the meteorologists classify these things as more like "dust devils" than tornadoes, but still...[/QUOTE]

I understand similar phenomenon has been observed on Mars.

But, still...

Dr Sardonicus 2021-11-16 02:29

Meanwhile, back on Planet Earth...
 
Some indisputably severe-weather related tornadoes (albeit weak for tornadoes) occurred in New England, something of a rarity for this time of year: [url=https://apnews.com/article/connecticut-new-haven-tornadoes-storms-weather-020792157476012e3221d739ee67967d=]Rare November tornadoes hit Connecticut, Rhode Island[/url][quote]NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) - Three tornadoes that hit Rhode Island and southeast Connecticut this weekend were the first since at least 1950 to strike the area in November, the National Weather Service said Sunday.

The service confirmed the three tornadoes touched down Saturday evening. An EF-1 hit near Stonington, and Westerly, Rhode Island; an EF-0 hit in North Kingstown, Rhode Island; and another EF-0 touched down near Plainfield, and Foster, Rhode Island. Representatives from the service were in the region Sunday to investigate damage. No deaths or injuries were reported.

"Since 1950, there has never been a tornado recorded in CT or RI in the month of November," the NWS tweeted. "MA last recorded a November tornado on 11/07/1971."[/quote]

Uncwilly 2021-12-11 15:49

Big storm system in the area covering parts of Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, and Illinois
[URL="https://www.npr.org/2021/12/11/1063335433/dozens-are-feared-dead-as-tornadoes-hit-midwestern-and-southern-u-s"]https://www.npr.org/2021/12/11/1063335433/dozens-are-feared-dead-as-tornadoes-hit-midwestern-and-southern-u-s [/URL]

Dr Sardonicus 2021-12-11 17:22

1 Attachment(s)
[QUOTE=Uncwilly;594985]Big storm system in the area covering parts of Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, and Illinois
[URL="https://www.npr.org/2021/12/11/1063335433/dozens-are-feared-dead-as-tornadoes-hit-midwestern-and-southern-u-s"]https://www.npr.org/2021/12/11/1063335433/dozens-are-feared-dead-as-tornadoes-hit-midwestern-and-southern-u-s [/URL][/QUOTE]The tornado that went through Mayfield, KY had a [i]very[/i] long track - over 200 miles. I can't quite tell from the picture, but this may a [i]four[/i]-state tornado. It definitely went through the boot heel of MO, the NW corner of TN, and a long way through KY. But it may have started in AR. (Picture of "Four Likely Tornado Tracks" from the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management)

Uncwilly 2021-12-11 18:01

The one near St Louis also destroyed an Amazon warehouse in Illinois. I know someone that lives in the town where it was.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-12-13 02:48

I've read reports that there are at least 6 confirmed dead at the Amazon warehouse in Edwardsville.

I'm confused by reports out of Mayfield, KY about the candle factory. Early today, I read reports of 110 inside at the time, 40 rescued and 40 unaccounted for. Yesterday morning I read a report that said the county coroner had conformed 18 dead.

But the 18 might have been for the county. Today I read reports of 8 confirmed dead and 8 still unaccounted for at the candle factory, but no reports about more people being pulled from the wreckage.

It seems that there was a work-release crew from the Graves County Jail working at the candle factory. All survived, and some helped in the rescue effort. However, one inmate who was injured apparently walked away after being treated in a hospital. Also, the corrections officer who had been supervising the work-release crew was killed.

I read reports that the tornado that struck Mayfield carried debris 30,000 feet into the air. Also that the length of the track may be a new record, over 220 miles.


All times are UTC. The time now is 16:58.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.