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wildrabbitt 2019-07-28 12:14

Stormy weather
 
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The castle was 'hit' by lightniing.



[URL]https://www.mersenneforum.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=20811&stc=1&d=1564316037[/URL]


Can someone tell me how to get picture into thread page?

Nick 2021-02-06 12:35

We have a code red weather alarm in the Netherlands for blizzard conditions tomorrow.
That is very rare here so it could be quite disruptive!

xilman 2021-02-06 13:17

[QUOTE=Nick;570976]We have a code red weather alarm in the Netherlands for blizzard conditions tomorrow.
That is very rare here so it could be quite disruptive![/QUOTE]Just across the North Sea from you we have an amber warning. Warnings start at 2400UTC today.

Already being called Beast from the East II.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-06 13:52

[QUOTE=Nick;570976]We have a code red weather alarm in the Netherlands for blizzard conditions tomorrow.
That is very rare here so it could be quite disruptive![/QUOTE]I pulled up [url=http://alarm.noodweercentrale.nl/europe-index-en.html]this map[/url] for a bigger picture. It looks like the Red alert is in the eastern part of the Netherlands. There are some Orange and Yellow alerts too. Some areas of [color=red][strike]France[/strike][/color] Germany are in [i]Violet![/i] That can't be good!

[url=http://alarm.noodweercentrale.nl/]This map[/url] is just for the Netherlands. Hmm, high winds along the central to northern coast...

Where I'm at, we're due for some snow and a LOT of cold. We may see a high of 22 F (around -5 C) today, and then it gets colder.

Some snow overnight, and a bit more off and on early this coming week. Highs around 15 F (-10 C) or lower, and lows between around 5 and -5 F (around -15 to -20 C) through Friday.

I've already got cabinet doors ajar below my sinks so the pipes don't freeze.

Well, at least this cold spell should knock the bugs down a bit...

xilman 2021-02-06 14:19

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570981]Some areas of France are in [i]Violet![/i] That can't be good![/QUOTE]It has changed since you posted. Now violet only in das vierte Reich.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-06 15:03

[QUOTE=xilman;570982]It has changed since you posted. Now violet only in das vierte Reich.[/QUOTE]Dang! I meant Germany. I don't know why I typed "France."

Till 2021-02-06 15:32

I am living on the northern edge of the "violet zone". The weather forecast looks interesting but not catastrophical. Probably we'll get around 20 cm snow by tomorrow. The temperatures may drop to about -15 degree Celsius next week.


In the Harz mountains it will be a bit harder with more snow and wind gusts up to 100kmh.
But the biggest problem may be ice rain south of the "violet zone". Forecasts say up to 5 cm ice layers are possible. That could break many trees and power lines.

storm5510 2021-02-06 15:42

Perhaps one of you could put up a map with all the colored zones?

[U]Disregard[/U]. Somebody above had one. Sorry!

Till 2021-02-06 15:46

Dr. Sardonicus did.

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570981]I pulled up [URL="http://alarm.noodweercentrale.nl/europe-index-en.html"]this map[/URL] for a bigger picture.[/QUOTE]

The map seems to get updated regularly.


Edit: I didn't update before posting, sorry.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-06 16:28

[QUOTE=Till;570990]I am living on the northern edge of the "violet zone". The weather forecast looks interesting but not catastrophical. Probably we'll get around 20 cm snow by tomorrow. The temperatures may drop to about -15 degree Celsius next week.


In the Harz mountains it will be a bit harder with more snow and wind gusts up to 100kmh.
But the biggest problem may be ice rain south of the "violet zone". Forecasts say up to 5 cm ice layers are possible. That could break many trees and power lines.[/QUOTE]Glaze ice is very bad. The worst ice storm I remember hearing about was the January 1998 storm in the northeastern US and Canada. The National Weather Service has a 10-year anniversary page [url=https://www.weather.gov/media/btv/events/IceStorm1998.pdf]here[/url].

I've experienced a few ice storms, but much smaller accumulations - maybe a quarter-inch (around 6 [strike]cm[/strike] mm). That's more than enough to turn "rush hour" into a demolition derby, and turn walking into skating or falling.

Ahh, clicked on the wide-view near the violet, and got the larger scale map of Germany. The "black ice" warning is in the yellow zone E and W of Frankfurt. Squiggles and exclamation points.

masser 2021-02-06 16:47

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570995]Glaze ice is very bad. The worst ice storm I remember hearing about was the January 1998 storm in the northeastern US and Canada. The National Weather Service has a 10-year anniversary page [url=https://www.weather.gov/media/btv/events/IceStorm1998.pdf]here[/url].
[/QUOTE]

I experienced the 98 Ice Storm; the photo gallery at the end of that link gives a good visual sense of the tree damage. A lot of the ice accumulation happened overnight and I recall a period where it was impossible to sleep due to the incredible sounds of large branches in the nearby woods snapping under the weight and then showering their surroundings with ice and branches.

Nick 2021-02-06 16:56

Amsterdam is restricting boats on some of its famous canals in order to increase the chance of ice forming so that people can skate there.

Uncwilly 2021-02-06 16:57

[QUOTE=Nick;570976]We have a code red weather alarm in the Netherlands for blizzard conditions tomorrow.[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE=xilman;570979]Just across the North Sea from you we have an amber warning. [/QUOTE]
Should not severe winter weather have colours like deep blue, blue, and purple? Red should be for hot, just like it it used to show temps on the maps normally.

Till 2021-02-06 17:07

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570995]Glaze ice is very bad. The worst ice storm I remember hearing about was the January 1998 storm in the northeastern US and Canada. The National Weather Service has a 10-year anniversary page [URL="https://www.weather.gov/media/btv/events/IceStorm1998.pdf"]here[/URL].[/QUOTE]

Quite impressive ;-)


[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570995]I've experienced a few ice storms, but much smaller accumulations - maybe a quarter-inch (around 6 cm).[/QUOTE]

You meant 6 mm, right?


[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570995]Ahh, clicked on the wide-view near the violet, and got the larger scale map of Germany. The "black ice" warning is in the yellow zone E and W of Frankfurt. Squiggles and exclamation points.[/QUOTE]


I expect that "black ice" zone to move northwards. Very slowly. I hope it does not get where I live.

kriesel 2021-02-06 17:44

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570995]Glaze ice is very bad.[/QUOTE]Yes. Especially for areas dependent on overhead utility wiring (electrical power, communications), or transportation passing under or near trees.
Where I lived in Wisconsin during [URL="https://madison.com/wsj/weather/photos-remembering-the-great-ice-storm-of-1976/collection_b528444d-9b92-58d7-8d74-59c3a0e9b789.html#1"]this[/URL] was without electricity for a week (and a neighbor's siding had arc marks where the block's transformer input lines had sparked on their way from the pole to the ground). The live 4KV lines laid on the ground for a week until someone of the utility repair crews from 7 states that responded could get around to dealing with it. Other parts of the state were without functioning grid delivered power for nearly a month. Sidewalks and streets were partly blocked by broken off tree limbs or whole trees the evening it hit. Generators and chain saws and their owners were popular. Lack of power meant lack of heat, cooling, lighting, and water.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-06 17:49

[QUOTE=Till;571007]You meant 6 mm, right?[/quote]Right. (Geez, some days it doesn't pay to get up...)[quote]
I expect that "black ice" zone to move northwards. Very slowly. I hope it does not get where I live.[/QUOTE]Knock on wood! [taps knuckles on side of head]

storm5510 2021-02-06 19:43

When people in my neck of the woods talk about winter weather events, they always gravitate to [URL="https://www.weather.gov/iln/19780126"]The Great Blizzard of 1978[/URL]. I experienced it myself. The lowest barometer reading I remember was 28.4 in-hg. 961 millibars, or there about. This was when the storm center was over Northern Ohio. The wind was incredible. I lived in a mobile home. That thing rocked and rolled all night as the storm passed through. It was amazing that many people did not lose the power. I didn't lose mine. There are lots of photos in the link above.

xilman 2021-02-06 19:59

I remember the winter of 1963, even though I was only very young at the time. I still carry its marks on my toes which became far too cold far too often. It was the coldest winter in the UK for over 200 years. My parents remembered its predecessor in 1947.

More at [url]https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/learn-about/weather/case-studies/severe-winters[/url]

More recently in 1982 I had to dig my motorbike out of a snowdrift in a temperature of -22C. To my surprise it started at the first touch of the button, albeit making a strange chugging noise. Riding into the lab was interesting, though safe enough because hardly anyone else was on the snow-covered roads.

Till 2021-02-06 20:55

[QUOTE=storm5510;571021]When people in my neck of the woods talk about winter weather events, they always gravitate to [URL="https://www.weather.gov/iln/19780126"]The Great Blizzard of 1978[/URL]. I experienced it myself. The lowest barometer reading I remember was 28.4 in-hg. 961 millibars, or there about. This was when the storm center was over Northern Ohio. The wind was incredible. I lived in a mobile home. That thing rocked and rolled all night as the storm passed through. It was amazing that many people did not lose the power. I didn't lose mine. There are lots of photos in the link above.[/QUOTE]


Interestingly, in northern Germany, 1978 featured the hardest winter storm remembered since then, too. See e.g. (german source)

[url]https://www.wetteronline.de/wetter-spezial/chronik-einer-schneekatastrophe-der-jahrhundertwinter-1978-79-2007-06-01-ws?section=Winter197879[/url]


The link says "one-in-a-hundred-years winter". I remember loads of snow, and a big tree having fallen near to our house after my family and me returned from an excursion.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-07 01:43

The winter of 1978-79 was bad in the Chicago area too. I was visiting my folks there during winter break. There were two major snowfalls, one of 20" (50.8 cm) and one of 16" (40.64 cm) and some smaller ones. When I left to start classes, the fences around the back yards were completely buried, and they were 4 feet (1.2 m) high. It also stayed below freezing continuously for around 30 days. It was cold enough for long enough that the "frost line" reached five feet (1.5 m) below ground, which was significant, because that's how deep water service lines are buried in that area. A lot of people had to hire backhoe operators to dig down to their service lines so they could be thawed out. People were talking about a "new ice age."

The utter failure of Chicago's snow removal operations that winter resulted in the incumbent Mayor getting turfed out in the April 1979 primary, an occurrence that would have been inconceivable a few years previously.

Nick 2021-02-07 10:07

Right now, it's snowing horizontally.
There is less snow than we had feared, but the strong freezing wind is causing problems.

xilman 2021-02-07 11:44

[QUOTE=Nick;571072]Right now, it's snowing horizontally.
There is less snow than we had feared, but the strong freezing wind is causing problems.[/QUOTE]Just started here. Drifting down very slowly. Would be horizontal but for all the bamboos and yew trees acting as windbreaks at low level.

The bamboos are performing Mexican waves in the strong northerly wind.

pinhodecarlos 2021-02-07 11:45

Last time it did snow a lot in my birth city back in the 80’s, between 1983-1986. Can’t precise, but it was wonderful. I couldn’t even make a snowman.

Nick 2021-02-07 14:22

You know it's a blizzard when the auto-focus on your camera can't find anything to latch on to and just keeps cycling!

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-07 16:16

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;571006]Should not severe winter weather have colours like deep blue, blue, and purple? Red should be for hot, just like it it used to show temps on the maps normally.[/QUOTE]It's a completely different system. Light green is "no warnings." Dark green is a "weather notice" or advisory. Yellow corresponds to a "watch" here in the USA - conditions are favorable for severe weather to develop, so be prepared. The other colors are "warnings" - severe weather is actually occurring. Orange is a possibly strong storm, red a strong storm, and violet an extremely strong storm. Symbols for the [i]type[/i] of bad weather are overlaid. Right now the red, violet and most of the orange areas for Germany indicate heavy snow. The dark green advisory areas north and south of the snowstorm warnings indicate slippery, icy roads. The orange area north and west indicates "storm/hurricane."

At least one local TV weather forecast uses a similar color scheme for the likely "degree of impact" of a forecast "weather event."

Right now it's bitter cold. Last I checked, the temperature was near zero F (-17.8 C). We got a little light, fluffy snow last night, the kind that's easier to broom than to shovel while it's still cold. Some people blow this kind of snow away with a leaf blower.

BTW I've heard that Fahrenheit set zero on his temperature scale at the lowest temperature where salt can melt ice.

xilman 2021-02-07 16:29

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;571091]BTW I've heard that Fahrenheit set zero on his temperature scale at the lowest temperature where salt can melt ice.[/QUOTE]That is what I heard too. The other end of the scale, 100F, is human body temperature.

Yes, I am well aware that the latter is generally taken to be 98.4F these days, but his thermometers were not as accurate as ours are.

ATH 2021-02-07 17:22

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;571091]BTW I've heard that Fahrenheit set zero on his temperature scale at the lowest temperature where salt can melt ice.[/QUOTE]

The highest concentration of [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saline_water"]Saline water[/URL] at 26% salt can keep water from freezing down to -19.18 C = -2.524 F

For a while I kept a bag of 1-2 liter of 26% saline water in my freezer, it was liquid at the -18 C we use in freezers.
If you wrap -18 C water around your beverage or whatever you want cooled, it gets cold really fast due to waters high specific heat capacity.

xilman 2021-02-07 17:33

[QUOTE=ATH;571093]The highest concentration of [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saline_water"]Saline water[/URL] at 26% salt can keep water from freezing down to -19.18 C = -2.524 F

For a while I kept a bag of 1-2 liter of 26% saline water in my freezer, it was liquid at the -18 C we use in freezers.
If you wrap -18 C water around your beverage or whatever you want cooled, it gets cold really fast due to waters high specific heat capacity.[/QUOTE]Good advice, of which I wasn't previously aware. Thanks!

Vodka needs to be drunk at seriously sub-zero temperatures, which is why we keep ours in the freezer. We have a jacket which is kept in the freezer and whichs contains some viscous substance, identity otherwise unknown, to put over bottles left out for convenient access. Your suggestion gives us an additional alternative.

storm5510 2021-02-07 17:36

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;571091]...Right now it's bitter cold. Last I checked, the temperature was near zero F (-17.8 C). We got a little light, fluffy snow last night, the kind that's easier to broom than to shovel while it's still cold. Some people blow this kind of snow away with a leaf blower.

BTW I've heard that Fahrenheit set zero on his temperature scale at the lowest temperature where salt can melt ice.[/QUOTE]

That's an interesting notation about salt. I haven't seen plain road salt used here in the U.S. for a really long time. Highway departments have a substance they spray on the roads with a straight-axle tanker before snow is expected to fall. It's easy to see after it's been sprayed. Five stripes in each lane about 3 inches wide each, evenly spaced. I don't know what it is they spray. I've only heard it referred to as "carbide." I imagine it would be really hard on a car body if not washed off. Back when road salt was used, it was stated that it would keep a road surface melted down to 20°F, (-6°C, or there about)

I've had my share of bitter cold in the past. Three weeks after my son was born in 1985, it was -24°F on a Sunday morning. The coldest I've personally experienced outside was -16°F in 2014. I drove my pickup-truck that day. The popping and cracking sounds the body made at is flexed were quite remarkable.

xilman 2021-02-07 17:39

[QUOTE=xilman;571094]Vodka needs to be drunk at seriously sub-zero temperatures, which is why we keep ours in the freezer.[/QUOTE]Is buffalo grass vodka, aka bison grass vodka, readily available in the US?

Just poured myself a dose, at -18C of course, prompted by your post.

ATH 2021-02-07 18:02

[QUOTE=xilman;571094]Good advice, of which I wasn't previously aware. Thanks!

Vodka needs to be drunk at seriously sub-zero temperatures, which is why we keep ours in the freezer. We have a jacket which is kept in the freezer and whichs contains some viscous substance, identity otherwise unknown, to put over bottles left out for convenient access. Your suggestion gives us an additional alternative.[/QUOTE]

Of course it is not super fast like using dry ice but a lot faster than just putting the beverage in the freezer. Fast enough so you do not want to forget it for very long, if it is something that can freeze and shouldn't.

I washed one of those very study 3 liter plastic bags you can buy windshield washer fluid in for the car. I could have used the original windshield washer fluid which was liquid down to -21C, but I did not want it in my freezer in case it should leak, so saline water seemed better.



Edit: The best saline water is actually 23.3% salt by weight, not 26%. It was a while ago I did it: [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brine[/url]

[QUOTE]The lowest freezing point obtainable for NaCl brine is −21.1 °C (−6.0 °F) at the concentration of 23.3% NaCl by weight.[4] This is called the eutectic point.[/QUOTE]

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-07 18:32

[QUOTE=storm5510;571095]<snip>
I haven't seen plain road salt used here in the U.S. for a really long time. Highway departments have a substance they spray on the roads with a straight-axle tanker before snow is expected to fall. It's easy to see after it's been sprayed. Five stripes in each lane about 3 inches wide each, evenly spaced. I don't know what it is they spray. I've only heard it referred to as "carbide." I imagine it would be really hard on a car body if not washed off. Back when road salt was used, it was stated that it would keep a road surface melted down to 20°F, (-6°C, or there about)
<snip>[/quote]I have heard of brines of various [i]chlorides[/i] used to prevent icing - sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. All are bad for the metal in motor vehicles, bad for trees and other plants along the roads, and I've heard stories that they're also bad for overhead power lines along roadways. The problem seems to be that when it's dry, salt dust gets airborne due to traffic, and is deposited on wires, insulators, and poles. A bit of moisture later on provides an electrical path from the wires to ground. Some of the stories I've heard were to the effect that after certain stretches of highway started getting pre-treated against icing, there were suddenly a lot of shorts to ground and/or wooden power poles catching fire along those stretches.

There is a treatment put [i]on top[/i] of packed snow and ice on roads called "antiskid." It's something like very coarse sand, possibly with a little salt mixed in. It provides traction on top of packed snow or ice, but whatever hasn't already wound up off the road clogging the storm drains etc has to be cleaned off the pavement later on.

xilman 2021-02-07 18:56

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;571102]There is a treatment put [i]on top[/i] of packed snow and ice on roads called "antiskid." It's something like very coarse sand, possibly with a little salt mixed in.[/QUOTE]Pretty much, perhaps identical, to what they use in the UK, though generally used ahead of snowfall as well as afterwards.

Works well here.

kriesel 2021-02-07 19:29

Loose solid rock salt (mined, crushed mostly sodium chloride) sprinkled on roadways by dispensers on the back of dump trucks is not very effective application. Some of it bounces directly off the pavement, and more is scattered by tires of following vehicles, from where it is most useful, to where it is least useful. Depositing brine in stripes that dries onto the pavement ahead of a storm is more effective use of the salt; it stays where it will be later useful, allowing equal effectiveness for much less salt introduced into the environment. It also has a lot of surface area per unit mass so is effective quicker. Groundwater and ecosystems are being affected by road salt use. [URL]https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2018/12/11/road-salt-harms-environment/[/URL]

Salted sand is used at low temperatures when salt is not very effective, or completely ineffective, and also as a substitute to reduce the corrosive and ecological effects of salt. Sand costs less than salt. Some salt in the sand is beneficial as it usually prevents wet sand from freezing into big clumps before application to the road. If it's too cold for that to work, we should probably stay home if possible. [URL]https://www.cargill.com/at-what-temperature-does-rock-salt-stop-working[/URL]

It's a safe bet they're not using [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_carbide"]calcium carbide[/URL] on roadways. That produces acetylene gas when reacted with water on contact, and is far more costly.

xilman 2021-02-07 19:46

[QUOTE=kriesel;571105]It's a safe bet they're not using [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_carbide"]calcium carbide[/URL] on roadways. That produces acetylene gas when reacted with water.[/QUOTE]As well as being far too expensive to manufacture and use in bulk.

CaCl[SUB]2[/SUB], OTOH, is a largely useless industrial by-product of the Solvay process.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-08 00:42

It looks like it's not snowing in most of [url=http://alarm.noodweercentrale.nl/]the Netherlands[/url] now. A lot of cold temperatures and some slippery icy roads, though. Looks like around -5 C (low 20's F) in a lot of the country. Maybe the canals can freeze over after all.

[b]EDIT:[/b] The snowstorm in Germany made the news, with a mention of the Netherlands included. [url=https://apnews.com/article/hannover-storms-berlin-weather-germany-43a7d596ae14df2fd3d13b6543e882ef]Heavy snowstorm pounds Germany, upends travel[/url][quote]In the Netherlands, snow blanketed much of the country, forcing the government to cancel a weekly crisis meeting to discuss the coronavirus pandemic. Train services were suspended and Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport warned passengers of possible flight cancellations.

National broadcaster NOS showed images of an early morning snowball fight involving residents and police on Amsterdam's central Dam Square.

The Dutch meteorological office KNMI raised its weather warning to code red for the whole country.[/quote]

chalsall 2021-02-08 00:47

[QUOTE=kriesel;571105]That produces acetylene gas when reacted with water on contact, and is far more costly.[/QUOTE]

Ah, the memories...

Blew out both my ear-drums (and placed iron-based shrapnel in my eyes at high speed) playing with that gas as a child.

I can replay that moment in my head at approximately 120 FPS (including the audio stream; the sudden blindness and audio buzz was quite immediate).

An experiment that went wrong as a child means I can't have an MRI to this day.

Sorry for the tangent... :wink:

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-08 01:06

[QUOTE=kriesel;571105] It's a safe bet they're not using [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_carbide"]calcium carbide[/URL] on roadways. That produces acetylene gas when reacted with water on contact, and is far more costly.[/QUOTE]The only use of any carbide on roadways I could think of was tire studs, which are made of tungsten carbide, an extremely hard material used in many implements of destruction. Studded tires can provide traction on ice or hard packed snow, but are so destructive to pavement, they're illegal in a number of states, and their use is limited in others.

Uncwilly 2021-02-08 02:08

Use of waste materials with like dried whey and other organic off casts have been used for roadway deicing. They perform similar function to salt, but are largely better for the surrounding biota. Decomposed granite (DG) and diatomaceous earth are spread for grippiness.

BTW, the way I heard it about Herr F., being an instrument maker, he knew that powers of 2 are easy to produce on a scale. 0 to 32 is one such number. 32 to 96 is another such number. (I have had to work with decimal feet. There are [FONT="Franklin Gothic Medium"]96[/FONT] [FONT="Courier New"]1/8"[/FONT] in a foot. That is close enough that dealing with the extra 0.01 foot per 3" is easy.)

storm5510 2021-02-08 14:48

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;571102]..There is a treatment put [I]on top[/I] of packed snow and ice on roads called "antiskid." It's something like very coarse sand, possibly with a little salt mixed in. It provides traction on top of packed snow or ice, but whatever hasn't already wound up off the road clogging the storm drains etc has to be cleaned off the pavement later on.[/QUOTE]

There's a big coal-fired power plant close to where I live. Many of the counties around go there to get loads of cinders to spread on snow-packed roads. It works somewhat. However, in the spring when the snow is gone and the roads are dry, the cinders can be as bad as Ice to drive on if a person gets too close to the edge of the roadway.

Till 2021-02-09 18:50

In my region, it all turned out fine.

As predicted we got a nice snow surface of ~20 cm in average (of course because of the wind it is 5cm in some places and 50cm in others). No ice rain except a little that fell on Saturday before the snowing started. Now we can enjoy the winter glory for at least a week since weather forecasts say that temperatures will stay below 0 degree Celsius. (but ok, yesterday it said that'ld be the case for at least 2 weeks)


Next night low is predicted to be -19 degree Celsius.

Nick 2021-02-09 22:17

[QUOTE=Till;571225]In my region, it all turned out fine.[/QUOTE]
Glad to hear you're OK!
No big problems here, either. And now that the storn has passed,
everyone is getting their ice skates out of storage.

chalsall 2021-02-09 22:29

[QUOTE=Nick;571235]Glad to hear you're OK![/QUOTE]

Indeed. Chaotic systems can be a bit to deal with as end products.

I raise beverage to you all, at approximately 0 degrees C.

H[sub]2[/sub]O ice cubes take enthalpy to create.

Worth the investment, from time to time...

:chalsall:

petrw1 2021-02-10 02:58

Warming up here
 
1 Attachment(s)
10 degrees warmer than yesterday.
NOTE: This is Celsius.

Nick 2021-02-10 12:36

[QUOTE=petrw1;571244]10 degrees warmer than yesterday.
NOTE: This is Celsius.[/QUOTE]
Is that normal at this time of year for you?

storm5510 2021-02-10 16:13

Old man winter has set up shop in my neck of the woods. 15 cm of snow Monday night, then another 1.25 into early this morning. No problem for me. The real issue is 60 km to my south. Freezing rain. 1.5 cm of ice accretion is possible. Those folks will have real problems when falling tree branches begin taking out electrical service lines. Temperatures are below zero on the C scale across the region. It is -5 at my location. This event is to continue until Thursday evening.

petrw1 2021-02-10 17:44

[QUOTE=Nick;571260]Is that normal at this time of year for you?[/QUOTE]

This is a cold-snap. What the weatherman calls a "Polar Vortex".
We can see -40 a few days a winter.

Normal this time of year is highs of -13; lows of -23.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-10 17:48

[QUOTE=petrw1;571244]10 degrees warmer than yesterday.
NOTE: This is Celsius.[/QUOTE]This reminds me of listening to [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-gJY9-BJO8]The Frozen Logger[/url] as a kid, on a record my parents had of a group called "The Weavers."

Hmm, -38 C is near -40, which is the same for Fahrenheit and Celsius. Colder than I've experienced. But Saskatchewan is north of North Dakota, where they say, "Forty below keeps the riff raff out."

Uncwilly 2021-02-10 18:10

Obligatory:

[URL="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45081/the-cremation-of-sam-mcgee"]The Cremation of Sam McGee[/URL]
[QUOTE]On a Christmas Day we were mushing our way over the Dawson trail.
Talk of your cold! through the parka's fold it stabbed like a driven nail.
If our eyes we'd close, then the lashes froze till sometimes we couldn't see;
It wasn't much fun, but the only one to whimper was Sam McGee.[/QUOTE]

kriesel 2021-02-10 21:14

We're not made for this. Choose well, for yourself and others.
[URL]https://www.outsideonline.com/2152131/freezing-death[/URL]
Decades ago I house-sat while a sister and her husband went skiing further north.
The receipt from the grocery store where I had bought milk that had begun to freeze in the few blocks drive back said it was -37F (-38C) in that town (~43 degree N latitude) and +37F (+3C) in Anchorage Alaska (~61 degree N latitude).
There was news coverage around that time, of a different couple who went skiing with their toddler in a carrier on the dad's back. When they got back indoors a couple hours later, they discovered their child was not napping as they had thought during the skiing; it was dead of hypothermia.
[URL]https://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/protecting-kids-from-extreme-cold[/URL]
Don't count on setting a record. [url]http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/620609.stm[/url]

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-10 22:13

I remember someone on the staff at summer camp reciting [i]The Cremation of Sam McGee[/i] from memory.

[url=https://americanliterature.com/author/jack-london/short-story/to-build-a-fire][i]To Build a Fire[/i][/url] by Jack London also comes to mind.

John McPhee's book [u]Rising from the Plains[/u] featured geologist David Love, who grew up on a ranch in Wyoming. He recalled the following:[quote]His father was with him one cold and blizzarding January day when David's rifle and the rabbits he was carrying slipped from his hands and fell to the snow. David picked up the gun and soon dropped it again. "It was a cardinal sin to drop a rifle," he says. "Snow and ice in the gun barrel could cause the gun to blow up when it was fired." Like holding on to a saddle horn, it was something you just did not do. It would not have crossed his father's mind that David was being careless. In sharp tones, his father said, "Laddie, leave the rabbits and rifle and run for home. Run!" He knew hypothermia when he saw it, no matter that it lacked a name.[/quote]

Uncwilly 2021-02-10 23:01

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;571282]John McPhee's book [u]Rising from the Plains[/u] featured geologist David Love, who grew up on a ranch in Wyoming. He recalled the following:[/QUOTE]A friend was a member of the Canadian Royal Air Force many years ago. He was in Winterpeg and some member of the brass was flying in. He and a few others were required to go out and wait on the flight line at parade rest (with their hands on the muzzle of their weapons) for something in the neighbor of an hour or more for the brass to show up. It was bitterly cold and he had to wait for several minutes, after getting inside, for his hand to warm up enough, so he could release the gun. He does not have happy thoughts about the officer that sent them out there to wait.

chalsall 2021-02-10 23:33

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;571283]He does not have happy thoughts about the officer that sent them out there to wait.[/QUOTE]

Different context, but...

As a young Geek growing up dealing with winters in the interior of BC, CA I used to turn on the (electric) furnace as far as it would go and then go and wrap myself in a blanket directly over a radiator, and read and/or code.

My father hated the cold. How I first manifested where I did I don't think either of us will ever fully understand. (Perhaps it had something to do with the basic Human need of keeping warm...:smile:)

petrw1 2021-02-11 15:52

That's more like it....
 
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I might have to put on long pants and a sweater today :big grin:

LaurV 2021-02-11 16:45

Just two deg lower and you wouldn't have to care anymore if it is Celsius or Fahrenheit... :razz:

petrw1 2021-02-11 17:16

[QUOTE=LaurV;571328]Just two deg lower and you wouldn't have to care anymore if it is Celsius or Fahrenheit... :razz:[/QUOTE]

About 25 years ago we had a similar but colder cold snap.
A coworker from just out of town came in to work all grumpy.
Cold weather can do that to people, even those of us sort of used to it.
Turns out he was upset because the thermometer at his house read (only )-48 C.
He thought it would be much a better story to tell his grandchildren if it could have been just 2 degrees colder. -50 sounds so much colder than -48.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-11 17:42

[QUOTE=petrw1;571321]I might have to put on long pants and a sweater today :big grin:[/QUOTE]... And that's while you're still indoors!

When I was in high school, one of our neighbors' mother was visiting. She described some of the things that happened when it got to -40 or -50 F when she was growing up in Minnesota. One thing was, there would be frost on the [i]inside[/i] doorknob.

I've read that the coming of air colder than -40 is sometimes heralded by a glittering mist, which is probably due to -40 being the temperature at which any excess moisture in the air spontaneously freezes out. I've also read that when it gets extremely cold, pine trees, or their branches, can explode.

Mercury solidifies around -40, and 100 proof liquor will freeze somewhere around that point.

storm5510 2021-02-11 18:02

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This is shirt sleeve weather for those folks. :smile:

petrw1 2021-02-11 18:17

:bow:
[QUOTE=storm5510;571341]This is shirt sleeve weather for those folks. :smile:[/QUOTE]

bsquared 2021-02-11 18:43

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;571336]... And that's while you're still indoors!

When I was in high school, one of our neighbors' mother was visiting. She described some of the things that happened when it got to -40 or -50 F when she was growing up in Minnesota. One thing was, there would be frost on the [i]inside[/i] doorknob.
[/QUOTE]

This is a common problem for us here in MN. We run a whole-house humidifier in the winter so we won't all wake up with bloody noses. The drawback is that the inside door hinges frost up, and ice dams form on the inside of windows, where all that (relative - still only about 45%) humidity condenses. Just the other day we had a mini-waterfall occur indoors when sunny weather melted the ice dam that had formed on the top section of a 10-foot tall bay window. It's never good when we hear water running/splashing in the living room...

kriesel 2021-02-11 19:27

When I was growing up in Wisconsin there was frost on the inside of the inner window panes of bedrooms in the winter. And the only humidifer was us. We could get quite a light show from the static discharges of the blankets.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-11 21:42

It wasn't more than -15 C, but there [i]was[/i] snow on the ground and it was powdery, when I indulged in a winter custom at a hot springs I was at long, long ago. The custom was, after being in the sauna for a while, people would run outside, naked, make "snow angels," and then go back into the sauna. It took a while before you really started feeling the cold, but once you did, it was time to [i]run[/i] back to the sauna!

chalsall 2021-02-12 00:11

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;571358]It took a while before you really started feeling the cold, but once you did, it was time to [i]run[/i] back to the sauna![/QUOTE]

Resonating with this. Somewhat along the lines of evolution in action...

Some of us grew up where we were exposed to extremes and were always told by our immediate caregivers not to put our tongue on anything cold.

Or, if you were that stupid for some reason, don't pull away. Wait for the teachers and the principal to come to the rescue with tepid water (some while screaming).

For some weird reason, at least one kid per year in my elementary school graduated with fewer tastebuds than most...

(A possibly weird, but true, story. When we got into later grades we played different tricks on each other dealing with low temperatures...)

storm5510 2021-02-12 01:18

[QUOTE=chalsall;571369]Resonating with this. Somewhat along the lines of evolution in action...

Some of us grew up where we were exposed to extremes and were always told by our immediate caregivers not to put our tongue on anything cold.[/QUOTE]

A documentary I watched several years ago about a group of men searching in Siberia for an intact frozen Wolly Mammoth. They decided to talk to some of the indigenous tribes which wandered the area. One man they spoke to was wearing only a red tee-shirt outside. The narrator says the temperature is -70°F. The old saying, "It's all in what a person is used to," certainly rings true in this instance. The man would not be able to tolerate the environment most of us are used to, and we could not tolerate his.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-12 02:09

In [url=https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-xpm-2013-dec-10-la-sh-lowest-temperature-recorded-antarctica-20131210-story.html]a 2013 LA Times article [/url] about the (then) coldest temperature of 135.8 F or -93.2 C recorded by satellite in Antarctica, I found what is probably the most extreme "dash from the sauna" done anywhere:[quote]If you haven't heard of the 300 Club, that's when those wintering at the Amundsen-Scott station observe the first day at 100 degrees below zero Fahrenheit by soaking in a sauna then dashing outside wearing nothing but their boots. That's a temperature change of 300 degrees.[/quote]

LaurV 2021-02-12 04:41

I remember when I was young and living with parents, during the tough Romanian winters when it got to -20°C, -30°C, and sometimes below, we always had trouble.... in wardrobes, chiffoniers, etc, :lol:, they were around the rooms on the walls and when you get over +20 inside the walls and under -20 outside the walls, then the [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dew_point"]dew point[/URL] is [B][U]exactly[/U][/B] in your cupboard. So, if you don't let the cupboard open to warm the air inside, the air inside them gets colder because the wall behind is cold, and your clothes get soaked and you smell like wet dog all day.

Xyzzy 2021-02-12 13:28

Canadian Temperature Scale:

+70 degrees
Texans turn on the heat and unpack the thermal underwear.
People in Canada go swimming in the Lakes.

+60 degrees
North Carolinians try to turn on the heat.
People in Canada plant gardens.

+50 degrees
Californians shiver uncontrollably.
People in Canada sunbathe.

+40 degrees
Italian & English cars won't start.
People in Canada drive with the windows down.

+32 degrees
Distilled water freezes.
Lake Superior's water gets thicker.

+20 degrees
Floridians don coats, thermal underwear, gloves, and woolly hats.
People in Canada throw on a flannel shirt.

+15 degrees
Philadelphia landlords finally turn up the heat.
People in Canada have the last cookout before it gets cold.

0 degrees
People in Miami all die.
Canadians lick the flagpole.

20 below
Californians fly away to Mexico.
People in Canada get out their winter coats.

40 below
Hollywood disintegrates.
The Girl Scouts in Canada are selling cookies door to door.

60 below
Polar bears begin to evacuate the Arctic.
Canadian Boy Scouts postpone "Winter Survival" classes until it gets cold enough.

80 below
Mt. St. Helens freezes.
People in Canada rent some videos.

100 below
Santa Claus abandons the North Pole.
Canadians get frustrated because they can't thaw the keg.

297 below
Microbial life no longer survives on dairy products.
Cows in Canada complain about farmers with cold hands.

460 below
ALL atomic motion stops (absolute zero in the Kelvin scale).
People in Canada start saying, "Eh, Cold 'nuff for ya?"

500 below
Hell freezes over.
The Leafs win the Stanley Cup

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-12 14:31

When I lived in Memphis, Tennessee I noticed that the violets were blooming around this time of year. It snows so seldom there that the city has no snow-removal equipment. If the weather forecast predicted snow, they would close all the schools. Instead of snow in the winter, there would usually be driving rain and a temperature around 38 F (3.3 C). That may seem like a joke to people who are accustomed to extreme cold, but if you're outside without a raincoat and get soaked in those conditions, you're in big trouble.

I also remember a couple of significant ice storms when I was there. They were about the only times I remember the drivers not all speeding. I did hear about one driver who had his tires spinning at about 50 mph but was only moving at a very slow speed due to lack of traction, until he got near an intersection, where the city had put down some grit. The car rocketed forward and crashed.

Even in the current cold spell, I'm hearing more and more kinds of bird calls and seeing more bird activity. They know spring is coming!

petrw1 2021-02-12 15:56

Just sayin
 
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...

xilman 2021-02-12 18:39

[QUOTE=Xyzzy;571414]500 below
Hell freezes over.[/QUOTE]According to both the good tourist guides, part of Hell has long since frozen over.

ATH 2021-02-12 19:25

We just had -20.7 C / -5.3 F during the night, the coldest in Denmark since Feb 5th 2012.

The coldest ever in Denmark (since measurements began in 1873) was -31.2 C / -24.2 F on Jan 8th 1982.

Nick 2021-02-12 19:41

[URL="https://www.lorentz.leidenuniv.nl/history/cold/cold.html"]Once the coldest place on Earth[/URL]

petrw1 2021-02-12 20:48

[QUOTE=Xyzzy;571414]Canadian Temperature Scale:
...
500 below
Hell freezes over.
The Leafs win the Stanley Cup[/QUOTE]

About as cold as a Mother-in-law stare?

chalsall 2021-02-12 21:55

[QUOTE=Xyzzy;571414]Canadian Temperature Scale:[/QUOTE]

That clearly took some effort, Mike. Thanks for that; very funny.

But it took some mental gymnastics to transform F to C (and then to K; even when it went out-of-bounds).

Just to prove I'm actually originally from Western Canada: "The metric system might be the only thing the French did correctly.

Nick 2021-02-13 12:27

It's now sunny and people are ice skating on the Prinsengracht canal in Amsterdam!
[URL]https://twitter.com/HugoStienstra/status/1360522673281929223[/URL]
(The tower in the background of the video clip is the Westertoren whose bells Anne Frank could hear in her Hiding Place.)

storm5510 2021-02-13 15:19

Three winter weather events are forecast for my area beginning tomorrow. Significant snowfall is expected with the 2nd on Tuesday. The NWS office in Louisville, KY, is not willing to quote a number for how much snow is expected. They feel they would be guessing. They want more information. Locations in Ohio are guessing. 18 to 24 inches, (46 to 61 cm). I went out yesterday and brought in enough groceries to last 10 days. I prefer to be prepared.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-13 15:41

[QUOTE=Nick;571515]It's now sunny and people are ice skating on the Prinsengracht canal in Amsterdam!
[URL]https://twitter.com/HugoStienstra/status/1360522673281929223[/URL]
(The tower in the background of the video clip is the Westertoren whose bells Anne Frank could hear in her Hiding Place.)[/QUOTE]That's good! It seems they had to wait. And the freeze won't last. This February 11 article in [url=https://www.dutchnews.nl/news/2021/02/popular-skating-locations-take-steps-to-deal-with-the-crowds-despite-coronavirus/]Dutch News[/url] says[quote]In Amsterdam, there was disappointment for people hoping to skate on the Prinsengracht canal, after a boat broke through the ice. The skipper was not aware that a ban on sailing has been in force in an effort to let the ice grow, council official Egbert de Vries told local broadcaster AT5.

The skipper has been fined, not for breaking the ice but for sailing the wrong way up the canal.

Weather forecasts indicate this weekend may be the last of the big freeze. On Monday, the temperature is no longer predicted to be below zero during the day, and on Tuesday the daytime temperature could hit 11 Celsius, according to the KNMI weather bureau, even though it will still be frosty at night.[/quote]

xilman 2021-02-13 17:04

As many here know, I live 50% of the time near El Paso (LP, not TX) and the remainder near Cambridge (UK, not MA).

Today the day time [B]maximum[/B] where I presently live was 2C. The night time [B]minimum[/B] in the other was 12C

You can probably guess where I am now.

LaurV 2021-02-15 05:10

[QUOTE=xilman;571538]You can probably guess where I am now.[/QUOTE]
In your bed, sleeping.
But at the time of posting, you were in front of the monitor.
What do I get?

MattcAnderson 2021-02-15 05:25

We just got done with 40 hours of no electricity. I'm glad the heat is back on. We had a nasty ice storm here in Oregon, USA.

Matt

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-16 00:43

[QUOTE=MattcAnderson;571628]We just got done with 40 hours of no electricity. I'm glad the heat is back on. We had a nasty ice storm here in Oregon, USA.[/QUOTE]
As far as the power going out, you've got plenty of company. [url=https://www.cnn.com/2021/02/15/weather/winter-storms-weather-monday/index.html]The power is off in many US homes as millions deal with frigid wintry weather[/url][quote]The bad weather was widespread, with more than a third of the continental US recording below-zero temperatures Monday.
The mercury dropped to 5 degrees in Dallas, 6 below zero in Oklahoma City and 32 below zero in Kansas City, Missouri -- the coldest for those cities since 1989. Snow fell in Brownsville, Texas, where measurable snow has occurred only twice on record since 1898.
<snip>[/quote]"Below-zero" is below zero Fahrenheit, or below -17.8 Celsius.[quote]The cold air is so widespread that you could travel nearly 2,000 miles from the Rio Grande on the Mexican border to the St. Lawrence River on the Canadian border entirely in winter storm warnings or watches.

Winter storms stretch from coast to coast, impacting 100 million people
There is the potential for more than 240 cold temperature records to be broken by Tuesday evening, and some records have already been shattered.[/quote]

jwaltos 2021-02-16 05:20

Arte Johnson as Wolfgang, a former German storm trooper would probably mutter.. "Verry interesting."
We're in Mennonite country and I don't believe there are snow tires on their carriages..however, anyone with a snowmobile is having a great time.

kriesel 2021-02-16 12:59

[QUOTE=jwaltos;571716]
We're in Mennonite country and I don't believe there are snow tires on their carriages.[/QUOTE]But the horses are four-hoof-drive each, and four-hoof ABS, with a degree of autonomous collision avoidance and GPS (homing on their usual feed bag location if allowed to choose their own course).

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-16 13:52

[QUOTE=jwaltos;571716]<snip>
We're in Mennonite country and I don't believe there are snow tires on their carriages..however, anyone with a snowmobile is having a great time.[/QUOTE]I remember many years ago seeing a news story about Amish buggies which [i]did[/i] have "snow tires." I don't remember whether that story featured studded horseshoes or studded buggy wheels, but I do remember seeing video showing patches of asphalt being lifted off the pavement as the buggy passed over it. [url=https://amishamerica.com/multiple-communities-face-amish-buggy-road-damage/]Apparently[/url] studded horseshoes and steel buggy wheels still do significant road damage.

Xyzzy 2021-02-16 18:47

[url]https://imgur.com/gallery/3jYlOGX[/url]

storm5510 2021-02-16 18:48

[QUOTE=MattcAnderson;571628]We just got done with 40 hours of no electricity. I'm glad the heat is back on. We had a nasty ice storm here in Oregon, USA.

Matt[/QUOTE]

This same storm system brought ice and snow to The Midwest, and now, below zero temperatures are coming. It is currently -4°F in parts of Missouri. The forecast for Louisville, KY, is 3°F Wednesday morning. This means below zero for my area. Another winter storm is to dump more snow and ice here on Thursday.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-17 00:17

During the Arab Oil Embargo that began in 1973, in response to US support of Israel in the Yom Kippur War, bumper stickers appeared in Texas (and other oil-producing states like Oklahoma and Louisiana):

[center][size=5]LET THE YANKEES FREEZE IN THE DARK[/size][/center]

Now, thanks to an Arctic invasion and winter storm system of staggering proportions, along with a "do it on the cheap" approach to electric power generation that did not allow for preparing power plants to work in really cold weather, it is millions of Texans who are freezing in the dark.

After 9 consecutive mostly cloudy, mainly windy days with highs below 20 F (-6.7 C) and the last few days below 10 F (-12.2 C), with lows around zero F (-17.8 C), today the sky was blue, the sun was shining, the wind wasn't blowing, and the temperature rocketed up to 15 F (-9.4 C). A welcome respite, except for the fact that there was about a foot (30.5 cm) of snow to shovel. I got the front sidewalks and porches for me and my neighbor done. I wasn't sure I could manage her driveway (or mine). She's 90 years old, and I've been helping her out with things like snow shoveling and resolving problems with her TV. If she needs to travel, having her driveway clear is best - she can get in and out of a car in her attached garage. A neighbor who had also been clearing snow thought one of her sons might be able to plow it, but offered to help me do it just in case.

I called her to advise her. While I was on the phone, I heard a big engine. Another neighbor was having their driveway plowed by a guy with a hauling and demolition business. He was using a small 4-wheel front end loader. As I learned later, my neighbor called to inquire, and was told it would cost her $50.00 for him to clear her driveway, and she said she'd think about it.

Just about that time, a man driving a back hoe showed up and immediately went to work on her driveway. When he finished, I asked him who he was. He was her nephew. I asked if he could give me a hand with my driveway. "Be happy to." I thanked him and bowed. My driveway was clear in minutes. He appreciated what I've been doing for his aunt.

Uncwilly 2021-02-17 02:42

Some good folks, some not good. In NYC all of their trash trucks do double duty as snow plows.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-17 14:29

I don't know whether it was headed to do plowing, but I saw a road grader go by yesterday on an already-plowed road. I reckon if it was headed to move snow, that snow was going to move. They'd probably called out anything that could serve as a plow.

It was below zero F (-17.8 C) again this morning. This cold has really gotten old. But the temperature is starting to rise a bit. It might get up to 15 F (-9.4 C) today, and stay above 10 F (-6.7 C) tonight. It might get up to 23 F (-5 C) on Saturday for the first time in two weeks, and [i]above freezing[/i] on Sunday!

storm5510 2021-03-17 19:02

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This could be a deadly day for those living in the Southeast U.S. A major tornado outbreak is expected in Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama. The NWS indicates large, long-track tornado's are very likely in the area. EF2 and stronger. All of this moves east for Thursday.

kriesel 2021-03-17 20:41

Not a good day to be [URL="https://genius.com/Thieving-birds-stuck-in-memphis-lyrics"]stuck in Memphis.[/URL] Or [URL="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kh6K_-a0c4"]Mobile[/URL]. Someone's going to have the [URL="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yF83aaIV0Jo"]Birmingham Blues[/URL].

Uncwilly 2021-03-17 21:11

[QUOTE=kriesel;573962]Not a good day to be [URL="https://genius.com/Thieving-birds-stuck-in-memphis-lyrics"]stuck in Memphis.[/URL] Or [URL="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kh6K_-a0c4"]Mobile[/URL]. Someone's going to have the [URL="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yF83aaIV0Jo"]Birmingham Blues[/URL].[/QUOTE]
I was in Memphis when Hurricane [STRIKE]Steve[/STRIKE] Harvey caused the tornado threat to be bad enough that the sirens went off.
Not a good day to be [URL="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgRafRp-P-o"]Walking in Memphis[/URL]

storm5510 2021-03-18 01:52

The area of greatest concern has been extended east into Georgia. Late winter outbreaks like this can be the worst.

The area where I am living now was hard-hit on April 3,1974. It is all residential now, but not nearly as much back then. The house one of my brothers lived in was destroyed. The walls were pulled out and the roof dropped straight down. My father had to stop on his way home from work and take shelter because it became so dark he could not see to drive. A group of people, including myself, watched from the parking lot of a Sunoco station about two miles to the south. The sun was shining and their was just a light breeze. That was a rough day for everyone from the Deep South all the way north to The Great Lakes. There were 9 fatalities in the county I live in.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-03-18 15:02

April 3, 1974. Hmm... [Google Google]

Wow. One tornado that day I still remember seeing covered on the news was the one that went through Xenia, Ohio. I remember an image, or perhaps video, of the funnel. It was grainy B&W but you could see that the tornado was a monster. It killed over 30 people. The destruction was appalling.

storm5510 2021-03-18 16:09

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[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;574038]April 3, 1974. Hmm... [Google Google]

Wow. One tornado that day I still remember seeing covered on the news was the one that went through Xenia, Ohio. I remember an image, or perhaps video, of the funnel. It was grainy B&W but you could see that the tornado was a monster. It killed over 30 people. The destruction was appalling.[/QUOTE]

In the days following, embroidered cloth napkins from a hotel in Brandenburg, KY, were found in Xenia, OH. Hanover College, a few miles west of where I live, had century-old trees twisted apart or pulled entirely out of the ground. Many campus buildings were severely damaged. The same storm cell which caused the damage to Brandenburg came through my county, and went on to Xenia. Witnesses in Xenia reported seeing the large funnel with many smaller funnels rotating around it like a carnival carousel.

The image below was taken in Moundville, Alabama, this morning. The Atlantic Coast states are on alert for later today.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-03-18 23:36

With all the severe weather today and yesterday, I happened to check: March 18, 1925 was the day of the Tri-state Tornado.

chalsall 2021-03-19 00:38

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;574096]With all the severe weather today and yesterday, I happened to check: March 18, 1925 was the day of the Tri-state Tornado.[/QUOTE]

It's currently raining a little bit in Bimshire.

In a month or so it will [URL="https://www.google.com/search?q=barbados+weather"]warm up enough[/URL] to be tolerable.


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