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-   -   Golden links (https://www.mersenneforum.org/showthread.php?t=25670)

Nick 2020-06-26 08:03

Golden links
 
This thread is intended for good links not related to one specific language.

Nick 2020-06-26 08:06

Dick Grune of the computer science department at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam
has written many articles and books on everything from compiler design to Korean.
His web page is here:
[URL]https://dickgrune.com/[/URL]

pinhodecarlos 2020-06-26 08:13

This is an open source Portuguese slang and idioms dictionary.


[url]https://natura.di.uminho.pt/~jj/pln/calao/dicionario.pdf[/url]

Uncwilly 2020-06-26 13:57

A most excellent podcast on the history of the English language. The presenter includes the history of the land as it is relevant to the story of the language.

[URL="https://historyofenglishpodcast.com/"]https://historyofenglishpodcast.com/[/URL]

He is a very good story teller. The themes and interwoven ties are interesting. This is not a boring history or language lesson. It is an exciting storytelling load with interesting information. Start from the beginning.

Nick 2020-06-28 13:14

A good article on ancient number systems (may require university library subscription):

Hollings, C. (2009). An Analysis of Nonpositional Numeral Systems. The Mathematical Intelligencer, 31(2), 15-23.

LaurV 2020-07-04 16:33

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;549126]A most excellent podcast on the history of the English language. The presenter includes the history of the land as it is relevant to the story of the language.

[URL]https://historyofenglishpodcast.com/[/URL]

He is a very good story teller. The themes and interwoven ties are interesting. This is not a boring history or language lesson. It is an exciting storytelling load with interesting information. Start from the beginning.[/QUOTE]
Posted not long ago by xilman and discussed repeatedly on the forum :razz:

Uncwilly 2020-07-04 18:35

[QUOTE=LaurV;549758]Posted not long ago by xilman and discussed repeatedly on the forum :razz:[/QUOTE]
:orly owl:
From newest to oldest (skipping a few where "History of English" only occurs in a quote of one of these posts.
[QUOTE=Uncwilly;548829]I have been listening to the "History of English" podcast for a while.[/QUOTE][QUOTE=rogue;528369]For those of you who love language, check out [URL="https://historyofenglishpodcast.com/"]History of English podcast[/URL].[/QUOTE][QUOTE=Mark Rose;496684]If you like this sort of thing, I've been enjoying [url=http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/]The History of English Podcast[/url].[/QUOTE][QUOTE=LaurV;495394]Thanks! Added to the list. Downloading/Torrenting. For those unable to google :razz:, [URL="http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/"]here is the link[/URL] (hopefully, I am getting the right thing).[/QUOTE]
[QUOTE=Uncwilly;495340]The History of English podcast might interest you then.[/QUOTE]
From Sept 13, 2012, the podcast started on June 18, 2012
[QUOTE=chappy;311409][SPOILER]just reading this thread makes me hungary.[/SPOILER]

May I suggest the History of English Language Podcast. Episode 1 will answer all. And listening further is a delight to the mind, a well done and interesting treatment of what I always assumed would be a dull subject.[/QUOTE]
Found no direct mention from xilman.

xilman 2020-07-04 19:54

[QUOTE=Uncwilly;549768]:orly owl:
From newest to oldest (skipping a few where "History of English" only occurs in a quote of one of these posts.


From Sept 13, 2012, the podcast started on June 18, 2012

Found no direct mention from xilman.[/QUOTE]That's a relief. I thought I was suffering from dementia-related memory loss.

LaurV 2020-07-05 05:01

Whoops... :blush: :redface:

Nick 2021-06-12 11:57

[URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silbo_Gomero"]Silbo Gomero[/URL] is a whistled language used in the Canary Islands (specifically on La Gomera) to communicate over long distances across deep valleys or ravines.
It is [URL="https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/whistled-language-of-the-island-of-la-gomera-canary-islands-the-silbo-gomero-00172"]recognized by UNESCO[/URL] as important cultural heritage.

rogue 2021-06-12 13:04

Although not a language, [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulning"]kulning[/URL] is very interesting. Here is a snippet from that link:

[quote]Kulning or herding calls (called laling, lalning or lålning in Norway and neighbouring parts of Sweden, kauking or kaukning in some parts of Norway, in the provinces of Dalarna and Hälsingland in Sweden and the former Norwegian provinces in Sweden, Jämtland and Härjedalen, also kulokk, kulokker, kyrlokker or a lockrop) is a domestic Scandinavian music form, often used to call livestock (cows, goats, etc.) down from high mountain pastures where they have been grazing during the day. It is possible that the sound also serves to scare away predators (wolves, bears, etc.), but this is not the main purpose of the call.[/quote]

Uncwilly 2021-06-12 13:51

[QUOTE=rogue;580785]Although not a language, [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulning"]kulning[/URL] is very interesting. Here is a snippet from that link:[/QUOTE]I heard a story about it on some podcast. It is used to both call the livestock and to communicate to others attending to their own livestock.

LaurV 2021-06-12 15:15

Ha! Our shepherds invented [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bucium"]a better way[/URL], which [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trembita"]was used[/URL] in the high mountains for few hundred years to communicate. The 5 to 8 meter thin tubes with a special construction would allow sending the sound over much longer distances, and it was used to warn when the invaders were coming, on in times of peace to send news. I grew in the Romanian mountains... Unfortunately the "language" is poorly known or mentioned, it is not documented much, it was kept between few, mostly in families and castes and it died with the old generations, once the telegraph and telephone took over.

xilman 2021-06-12 16:03

[QUOTE=Nick;549113]This thread is intended for good links not related to one specific language.[/QUOTE]One of the best links for investigating multiple languages, IME, is [url]http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Rosetta_Code[/url]

I've contributed a number of examples in Algol 68, including one which is, IMAO, by far the ugliest on the whole site.

ATH 2021-06-12 16:42

[QUOTE=rogue;580785]Although not a language, [URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulning"]kulning[/URL] is very interesting. Here is a snippet from that link:[/QUOTE]

[YOUTUBE]KvtT3UyhibQ[/YOUTUBE]
[YOUTUBE]nc7F_qv3eI8[/YOUTUBE]

kriesel 2021-06-12 16:44

The most irrational number
 
[url]https://slate.com/technology/2021/06/golden-ratio-phi-irrational-number-ellenberg-shape.html[/url] What's a golden links thread without a golden ratio link?

xilman 2021-06-12 16:54

[QUOTE=kriesel;580804][url]https://slate.com/technology/2021/06/golden-ratio-phi-irrational-number-ellenberg-shape.html[/url] What's a golden links thread without a golden ratio link?[/QUOTE]There are those who would state that phi is the least irrational of the irrational numbers. Its continued fraction representation is the most structured possible: [1;1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,...]

There are an uncountably infinite number of reals which do not have a computable representation in any form. One example is: given a representation of a Turing machine, the probability that it halts when measured over all possibleprograms and input data, both of which are countably infinite.

jwaltos 2021-06-19 03:40

[QUOTE=Nick;580777][URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silbo_Gomero"]Silbo Gomero[/URL] is a whistled language used in the Canary Islands (specifically on La Gomera) to communicate over long distances across deep valleys or ravines.
It is [URL="https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/whistled-language-of-the-island-of-la-gomera-canary-islands-the-silbo-gomero-00172"]recognized by UNESCO[/URL] as important cultural heritage.[/QUOTE]

That's neat. I never knew such a language existed.
This reminds me of "The Gods Must Be Crazy" and the clicking language..[url]https://www.funtrivia.com/askft/Question9978.html[/url]

Nick 2021-10-13 15:33

After many years of work, the new Dutch translation of the Bible is out today
[URL]https://bijbel.nbv21.nl/[/URL] (Dutch only)

BudgieJane 2021-10-14 21:35

[QUOTE=Nick;590439]After many years of work, the new Dutch translation of the Bible is out today ...
(Dutch only)[/QUOTE]
Is it any more correct than any of the previous translations?

Nick 2021-10-14 22:09

[QUOTE=BudgieJane;590591]Is it any more correct than any of the previous translations?[/QUOTE]
To get the best possible understanding, you have to study the original languages and the culture of the people who spoke them, of course.
The big problem with a translation into any modern language is: how much do you assume the reader to know about all that
(allowing you to stick closely to the original) and how much do you attempt to make things clearer?

With the Bible, these discussions often involve theological differences too.
In the Lord's Prayer, for example, some theologians object to saying "Lead us not into temptation" on the grounds that
God would never be a leader in something sinful! Others insist this is closest to the original text.

LaurV 2021-10-15 03:05

[QUOTE=Nick;590439]After many years of work, the new Dutch translation of the Bible is out today
[URL]https://bijbel.nbv21.nl/[/URL] (Dutch only)[/QUOTE]
did they make it gender neutral, etc? :razz:

Dr Sardonicus 2021-10-15 03:39

[QUOTE=Nick;590597]To get the best possible understanding, you have to study the original languages and the culture of the people who spoke them, of course.
The big problem with a translation into any modern language is: how much do you assume the reader to know about all that
(allowing you to stick closely to the original) and how much do you attempt to make things clearer?
<snip>[/QUOTE]Sometimes, additional source material becomes available. There is also the fact that modern languages change over time. Both of these factors are relevant to English translations since the King James Version.

Consider, for example, Matthew 12:1 (KJV):[quote]At that time Jesus went on the sabbath day through the corn; and his disciples were an hungred, and began to pluck the ears of corn, and to eat.[/quote]Of course, "corn" (as we think of it now) is a cereal grain of the New World. Jesus and the disciples couldn't possibly have been in a corn field! How could the translators have made such a mistake?

But it wasn't a mistake. When the KJV was being made, "corn" was a generic English term for grain. New translations in any modern language have to take into account the changing meanings of words.

Lariliss 2021-10-22 09:55

Today we call it globalization. 100 years ago it was another history, and we don’t know how many ‘minorities' went extinct.
Still there are lots of them indigenous around the World to be cared of.
Even English language lives in assimilating way in every country.
We are various and still try to go the same path and judge every corner of the globe in the same way.
The great works of scientists who go for human understanding.


'[I]The voices of indigenous people of the north including Siberia were recorded many decades ago on tape. That was the medium of the day to best capture the stories and language of the people. Today those tapes are seriously degrading and to ensure those voices of the past are preserved, anthropologist Professor David Anderson will co-lead a team to digitise them.

In a two year project funded by the Modern Endangered Archives Program at the UCLA Library with funding from Arcadia, Professor Anderson from Aberdeen University and a team of specialist sound technicians will extract the audio recordings from tapes which are currently held at Pushkin House in St Petersburg, Russia.

Today we call it globalization. 100 years ago it was another history, and we don't know how many 'minorities went extinct.
Still there are lots of them indigenous around the World to be cared of.
Even English language lives in assimilating way in every country.
We are various and still try to go the same path and judge every corner of the globe in the same way.
The great works of scientists who go for human understanding.[/I]' - quote.

a1call 2021-10-24 00:36

[QUOTE=Nick;590597]To get the best possible understanding, you have to study the original languages and the culture of the people who spoke them, of course.
The big problem with a translation into any modern language is: how much do you assume the reader to know about all that
(allowing you to stick closely to the original) and how much do you attempt to make things clearer?

With the Bible, these discussions often involve theological differences too.
In the Lord's Prayer, for example, some theologians object to saying "Lead us not into temptation" on the grounds that
God would never be a leader in something sinful! Others insist this is closest to the original text.[/QUOTE]

IIRC, that was the main subject for "East of Eden".

[QUOTE]
[B]thou mayest[/B]
According to one translation of the Bible, God orders Cain to triumph over sin, while according to another, God promises Cain that he will defeat sin. Lee's research, however, has revealed that [B]timshel [/B]means [B]“thou mayest,”[/B] implying that God tells Cain that he [B]has a choice[/B] whether or not to overcome sin. Lee sees this idea of free choice over evil a token of optimism that is central to the human condition.
[/QUOTE]

[url]https://www.sparknotes.com/lit/eastofeden/quotes/page/3/#:~:text=According%20to%20one%20translation%20of,overcome%20sin.%20Lee%20sees%20this[/url]

Nick 2021-10-24 08:05

[QUOTE=a1call;591465]IIRC, that was the main subject for "East of Eden".[/QUOTE]
Certainly an interesting link!
If you have university access to online journals, the Daniel Levin article is also worth reading:
[URL]https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/steinbeckreview.12.2.0190[/URL]

Nick 2021-11-09 14:21

[B]Why Flemish people adapt their Dutch to Dutch people and not other way around[/B]
[B][URL]https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/current/news/more-news/why-flemish-people-adapt-their-dutch-dutch-people-and-not-other-way-around[/URL]
[/B]
(in English!)


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